Flagler County Historical Society

Introduction

Second Seminole Indian War: Court of Inquiry – Operations in Florida

Transcript of the 25th Congress, 2nd Session, House of Representatives, War Department with correspondence from Gen. Hernandez about the local area.

Second Seminole Indian War: Court of Inquiry – Operations in Florida

25th Congress                   [ Doc. No, 78 ].                              Ho. OF Reps.
2d Session                                                                                              War Dept.

COURT OF INQUIRY – OPERATIONS IN FLORIDA, &C.

LETTER

FROM

THE SECRETARY OF WAR

TRANSMITTING

Copies  of  the  Proceedings  of  a  Court  of  Inquiry,  convened  at  Frederick-town in relation to the Operations against the Seminole and Creek Indian    &c

__________

JANUARY 8, 1938, 
Read, and laid upon the table.

__________

                                                                        DEPARTMENT OF WAR,
                                                                                                January 6, 1838.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  transmit,  herewith,  “a  copy  of  the  record  of the court  of  inquiry,  convened  at Fredericktown,  in relation  to the  operations  against  the  Seminole  and  Creek  Indians,”  which  contains  what  is  called  for in  the  first  three  paragraphs  of  the  resolution  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of  the  4th  of  October last;  and  to  enclose  a  report  and  documents  from  the  Commanding  General  in  answer  to  the fourth  and  last paragraph  of  that  resolution.

            Very respectfully, your most obedient servant, 
                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT.
Hon.  JAMES K.  POLK, 
            Speaker of the House of Representatives.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
                                                                        Washington, January 2, 1838  

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor,  herewith,  to  transmit  a  copy  of  the  correspondence  with  Major  General  Jesup,  and  all  other  information  which  can  be!  furnished  by  this  o1Hce,  in  relation  to  the  Creek and  Seminole  campaigns  as  required  by  the  resolution  of  the  House  of  Representatives  of  the  4th ·of  October,  1837.

            I  have  the  horror  to  be,  very  respectfully,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                      ALEX. MACOMB, 
                                                                        Major General commanding in chief.
To the SECRETARY OF WAR, 
            War Department, Washington, DC

__________

                                                            HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,  
                                                                        Washington, June 28, 1836.

    Sir:  I  have  received,  through  the  Secretary  of  War,  the  order  of  the  President  to  call  you  to  the  seat  of Government.  You  will,  therefore,  on  the  receipt  of  this  letter,  turn  over  to  Brigadier  General  Jesup  the  com­mand  of  the  troops  serving  against  the  hostile  Creeks,  and  repair  to  the  city  of  Washington.   

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  very  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,  
                                                                        ALEX.  MACOMB,                                                                                       Major General commanding in chief.
Major General W.  Scott, 
            Fort Mitchell,  Alabama.

__________

                                                            
                                    HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY;  
                                                                        Washington, June  28,  1836.

    Sir:  Major  General  Scott  having  been  ordered  to  the  seat  of  Govern­ment,  the  command  of  the  troops  serving against  the  hostile  Creeks  is,  by  direction of  the  President,  hereby  vested  in  you.  The  instructions  which  you received  from  the  War  Department,  on·  leaving  Washington  for  the  Creek  nation,  will  be  your  guide  in  executing  the  important  duties  which  are  hereby  again  devolved  on  you.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  very  respectfully,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                        ALEX.  MACOMB,  
                                                            Major General commanding in chief.
Major General Jesup,  
            Fort Mitchell,  Alabama.

__________

                                                            HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,  
                                                                        Washington, April 7, 1837.

Sir  :  From  the  favorable  reports  you  have  made  of  the  state  of  affairs  in  Florida,  and  the  recent  conduct  of  the  Indians,  we  are  led  to  the  belief  that  you  will  soon  terminate  matters  with  the  Seminoles.  If  such  should  be  the  case,  it  is  desirable  that  the  troops  should  be  sent  to  their  respective  stations,  as  indicated  in  a  late  general  order  concerning  the  artillery,  and  the  other  troops,  the  dragoons  and  infantry,  to  repair,  by  the  way  of  New  Orleans,  to  the  following  points,  viz:  the  dragoons  to  Jefferson  barracks,  where  the  whole  regiment  is  to  be  assembled  for  instruction;  and  the  6th  in­fantry  to  Jesup;  the  4th  to  New  Orleans  and  Baton  Rouge – say  5  com­panies  at  New  Orleans  and  5  at  Baton  Rouge.  As  the  public  property  will  require,  in  all  probability,  some  protection,  and  the  country  itself  the  countenance  of  some  military  force,  you  will  retain  such  as  you  may  deem  necessary  for  the  purpose;  but  the  dragoons  you  will  forward  to  New  Or­leans  as  soon  as  possible,  with  a  view  to  their  joining  at  Jefferson  barracks.  All  this  presumes  the  war  to  be  ended.

    In  a  letter  addressed  by  you  to  the  Colonel  of  Ordnance,  you  ask  for  an  -additional  officer  to  assist  Captain  d’Lagnel.  Cannot  you  supply  the  necessary  assistants  from  the  officers  of  the  artillery?  There  is  Lieutenant Thornton,  a  first-rate  ordnance  officer,  and,  I  dare  say,  many  others  very  comment  I will therefore request that you use your discretion in ordering officers  of  the  artillery  under  your  command  on  ordnance  service,  with  a  view  of  securing  all  the  property  belonging  to  that  department  in  Florida,  or  elsewhere,  belonging  to  the  army,  which  has  been  operating  in  the  Seminole  and  Creek  countries,

    General  Armistead  has  expressed  a  wish  that  he  might  be  indulged  with  leave  of  absence  after  the  close  of  the  war  in  Florida.  I  leave  it  to  your  discretion  to  grant  him  such  leave  of  absence  as  you  may  approve,  within  the  extent  of  the  regulations,  when  his  services  may  not  be  longer  required  n Florida.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  very  respectfully,  your  most  obedient  servant,                                                                                          ALEX.  MACOMB,
                                                                        Maj.  Gen.  commanding  in  chief;
To  Maj.  Gen.  THOS.  S.  JESUP,  
            Commanding  the  forces  U. S. in Florida.

                                                            HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,  
                                                                                    Washington, April 18, 1837.

    Sir  :  Since  I  last  addressed  you  on  the  subject  of  the  disposition  of  the  troops  at  the  close  of  the  war  in  Florida,  circumstances  connected  with  the  Southwestern  frontier  have  induced  a  change  from  that  communicated  to  you  in  my  letter  of  the  7th  of  April.  It  is  now  determined  by  the  Secre­tary  of  War  to  station  two  regiments  of  artillery  at  Camp  Sabine,  on  the  Sabine  river,  near  where  the  Nacogdoches  road  crosses;  one  regiment  and  six  companies  of  the  remaining  regiment  of  artillery  on  the  Sabine  river,  where  the  Opelousas road  crosses;  two  of  the  remaining-companies  to  be  stationed  at  some  healthy  position  as  near  the  mouth  of  the  Sabine  as  practicable,  and  one  at  Key  West;  the  two  companies  of  the  second  regi­ment  of  infantry  to  be stationed  at  the  Upper  Withlacoochee,  Georgia;  fourth  regiment  of  infantry,  five  companies  to  remain  in  Florida,  two  to  garrison  Baton  Rouge,  and  two  New  Orleans,  one  company  to  remain  in  the  Cherokee  country;  sixth  regiment,  seven  companies  to  be  sent  to  the  Sabine,  near  the  Opelousas  road,  three  companies  to  Camp.  Sabine;  the  whole  of  the  second  regiment  of  dragoons  to  be  concentrated  at  Jefferson  barracks.  You  will, therefore,  as  soon  as  the  circumstances  of  your  com­mand  will  permit,  order  the  whole  of  the  first  and  fourth  regiments  of  artillery  to  Camp  Sabine  ;  the  whole  of  the  second  regiment  of  artillery  and  six  companies  of  the third  to  Opelousas  road,  to  take  up  the  most  eli­gible  position  near  where  it  crosses  the  Sabine;  one  company  to  Key  West,  (Captain  Childs’s,)  and  two  companies  to  some  eligible  position  near  the  mouth  of  the  Sabine,  which  will  be  selected  after  the  arrival  of  the  regiment  at  the  Sabine.  You  will  understand  distinctly  that  this  arrange­ment  of  the  troops  is  not  to  go  into  effect  if  it  will  interfere  with  your  ar­rangements  in  reference  to  Florida,  but  as  far  as  it  will  not  interfere,  you  will  order  the  troops  to  their  respective  stations,  as  herein indicated.

    I have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  very  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    ALEX.  MACOMB,   
                                                                        Maj.  Gen.  commanding  in  chief.
Major General Jesup, 
                  Fort Dade,  Florida.

    P.  S. –  With  the  regiments  of  artillery,  I  wish  you  to  send  such  howitzers  and  field-pieces  as  may  be  deemed necessary  and  fit  for  service  on  the  Southwestern  frontier,  with  the  carriages,  harness,  and  other  equipments.  I  wish,  especially,  that  the  mountain  howitzers  be  sent  to  New  Orleans,  to  be  one  half  sent  to  Fort  Gibson,  and  the  other  half  to  Camp  Sabine.

                                                            A.  M.,  Maj.  Gen.  commanding in  chief.

                                                            HEADQUARTERS  OF  THE  ARMY,                                                                                Washington,  April  24,  1837.

    GENERAL:  A  letter  has  been  received  here,  from  the  Governor  of  Geor­gia,  in  relation  to  Colonel  Nelson,  of the  Georgia  volunteers,  stating  that  Colonel  Nelson  was  authorized  by  you  to  organize  a  staff  consisting  of  one adjutant,  one  surgeon,  and  one  quartermaster,  for  his  battalion.
    
    You  are  requested  to  send  to  the  headquarters  of  the  army  a  copy  of  your  order  authorizing  those  appointments,  that  the  Secretary  of  War  may  see  the  propriety  of  paying  those  officers.

   
    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  &c.

                                                                                                A MACOMB, 
                                                                            Maj.  Gen.  commanding in chief.
Major  General  THOMAS  S.  JESUP,


__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,  
                                                                        Washington, April 29, 1837.

    Sir  :  From  documents  received  from  his  excellency  the  Governor  of  Alabama,  and  from  other  quarters,  it  appears  that  there  are  many  of  the  Creek  Indians  still  in  the  swamps  and  fastnesses  of  the  country  ‘occupied by  them  before  the  emigration;  and,  with  a  view  of  preventing  further  calls  being  made  on  the  militia  of.  the  adjacent  States,  it  is  thought  best  to  send  to  Fort  Mitchell  some  of  the  regular  troops  under  your  command, whenever  you  think  yon  can  safely  spare  them.  .You  will,  therefore,  order  the  4th  regiment  of  infantry  thither, or  such  parts  of  it  as  you  can  spare.  

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  very  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                                    ALEX.  MACOMB,  
                                                                        Maj.  Gen.  commanding in  chief.
Major General THOMAS S.  JESUP,
            Commanding the army in Florida, Tampa Bay.

__________

                                                            HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,                                                                                   Washington, June 10, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  duly  received  your  several  letters  acknowledging  the  receipt  of  several  from  me,  and  stating  the slowness  of  the  movements  of  the  Seminoles  towards  embarking  for  the  West  and  your  desire  to  be  relieved  from  the  duty  of  superintending  the  sending  pf  them  off,  with  per­mission  to  leave  the  command  and  attend  to  your  private  concerns.  These  letters  have  been  all  shown  to  the  Secretary  of  War,  With  regard  to  your  leaving  Florida  until the  Indians  are  sent  off,  the  Secretary  could  not  consent  to  it,  as  it  would  be  difficult  to  supply  your  place  by  one  so conversant  with  all  the  arrangements  ;  and,  if  the  war  should  be  re­kindled,  the  experience  yon  have  had  in  conducting the  operations  in·  Florida  is  considered  as  too  valuable  to  be  lost  by  your  removal  from  the  command.

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  very  respectfully,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    ALEX.  MACOMB,
                                                                        Maj.  Gen. commanding  in chief.,
Major  General  JESUP,
            Commanding  the  troops  in  Florida.    

__________

                                                            HEADQUARTERS  OF THE  ARMY
                                                                                    Washington,  June  22,  1837.

    Sir  :  Your  communication.  dated  Tampa  Bay,  June  5,  1837,  ad­dressed  to  the  Adjutant-General,  has  been  received,  and  submitted  to  the  Secretary  of  War.  The  Secretary  of  War,  after  duly  considering  the  con­tents  of  your  communication,  has  requested  me  to  inform  you,  that  after  posting  the  troops  in  such  stations  as  to  cover  the  frontier from  hostile  attacks,  as  far  as  this  can  be  done  consistently  with  a  due  regard  to  their  health,  you  will  be  at  liberty  to  return  to  the  performance  of  the  duties  of  your  office  as  Quartermaster  General;  at  the  seat  of  Government  ; provided  that, on  the  receipt  of  this  letter,  you  still  desire  to  be  relieved  from  the  command  of  the  army  of  Florida. The  Department  of  War  waits  anxiously  for  your  views  as  to  the  preparation  which  you  consider  necessary  for  a  renewal  of  hostilities  in  October,  and  the  successful  prose­cution  of  the  war,  and  desirous  to  know  what  course  you  would  advise  to  be  pursued  with  the  Creek  warriors,  as  it  is  deemed  important  to  remove  their  families  as  early  as  practicable  to  their  homes.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    ALEX.  MACOMB,  
                                                                        Major General commanding in chief.Major General Thomas S.  Jesup,
Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                                        HEADQUARTER OF THE ARMY,  
                                                                                    Washington, June 30, 1837.

    Sir  :  If  you  can  possibly  dispense  with  the  services  of  the  marines,  you  will  order  them  to  their  headquarters  at  Washington.  Lieutenant  Col­onel  Miller  you  will  order  to  Washington  on  the  receipt  of  this.

I  am,  with  great  respect,  your  most  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    ALEX.  MACOMB, 
                                                                        Major General commanding in chief.Major General Thomas S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding the troops in Florida.

__________

                                                            HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,                                                                                               Washington, July 6, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  17th  ultimo,  addressed  to  the  Adjutant  General,  among  other  things  ex­pressing  a  desire  to  visit  Kentucky  for  a  few  weeks.  You  no  doubt,  ere  this, will  have  received  my  letter  authorizing  you  to  leave  the  command  of  the  army  in  Florida,  and  directing  you  to  repair  to  this  city  to  resume  your  functions  as  Quartermaster  General.  In  proceeding  to  Washington,  there  is  no  objection  to  your  taking  Kentucky  in  your  route,  and  spending  the  time  you  require  in  that  State.

    Wishing  you  health  and  prosperity,  I  remain,  with  great  consideration,  yours,  &c.

                                                                                    ALEX.  MACOMB,  
                                                            Major General commanding in chief.
Major General Thomas S, Jesup
            Commanding the army in Florida
                        Garey’s Ferry Florida.

__________

                                                            HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY
                                                                        Washington, August 15, 1837.

    GENERAL:  Agreeably  to  instructions  from  the  War  Department,  I  am  directed  by  the  General-in-chief  to request  that  you  will  detail  suitable  officers  to  take  charge  of  the  clothing  depots  to  be  established  at  Jackson­ville  and  Tampa  Bay.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  &c. 
                                                                        JOHN  N.  MACOMB, 
                                                                                                Aid-de-camp,
Major  General  Jesup
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida.


__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  November  8,  1836.

    Sir  :  Your  communications  of  the  16th  and  17th  of  October,  from  Tampa  Bay,  have  been  received,  and submitted  to  the  General-in-chief  and  Secretary  of  War,

                                                             I  am, sir,  &c.
                                                                                    R.  JONES.
Major General T.  S.  JESUP,
            Commanding,  &c,  St.  Mark’s, Florida.

__________

                                                ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                            Washington, November 10, 1836.

    Sir:  The  following-named  officers  of  the  army,  serving  in  Florida,  have  been  summoned  by  Captain  Cooper, the  special  judge  advocate  of  the  court  of  inquiry  now  in  session  at  Fredericktown:  as  witnesses  in  the  case  ordered  to  be  investigated  by  that  tribunal,  pursuant  to  “general  order”  No.  65, dated October 3.  The  summonses  were  transmitted  to  the  several  officers  named,  through  this  office,  at  the  request  of  the  judge  advocate.

    Captain  Drane,  2d  artillery;  Lieutenant  McCrabb,  4th  infantry;  Lieu­tenant  Betts,  1st  artillery.

    At  the  verbal  request  of  Captain  Cooper,  summonses  for  Major  Lomax,  3d  artillery,  and  Lieutenant  G.  Morris,  4th  infantry,  were  also  forwarded  through  this  office.  In  addition  to  the  above-named  officers,  the  follow­ing,  not  at  the  time  serving  with,  but  belonging  to,  the  Florida  troops, have  been  required  to  attend,  viz:  

    Brigadier General Eustis, Lieutenant Colonel Bankhead, Colonel Lind­say, Lieutenant J.  E.  Johnston,  Captain  Canfield,  Captain  Waite,  assistant  quartermaster,  and  Captain  Morrison.

                                                                        I am, sir, &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES.
Brev. Major General T.  S.  JESUP, 
            St.  Mark’s, Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,
                                                                        Washington, December 5, 1836.

    Sir  :  Your  communications  from  Tampa  Bay,  dated  the  3d  and  6th  of  November,  respectively,  enclosing  copies  of  your  correspondence  with  the  Governors  of  Georgia  and  Alabama  respecting  a  call  for  an  additional volunteer  force  for  the  service  in  Florida,  were  received  on  the  29th  ulti­mo,  and  submitted  to  the  Secretary  of  War,  the  General-in-chief  being  absent  at  Fredericktown.  The  transit  of  those  letters  appears  to  have  been  delayed,  as  Doctor  Elwes  informs  me  that,  having  been  charged  with  their  transmission,  they  were  unintentionally  retained  in  his  posses­sion  a  week  or  more  after  his  arrival  at  the  North,  or  before  he  committed them  to  the  post  office  at  Elizabethtown.  ·

    With  regard  to  the  supply  of  recruits  to  which  you  advert  in  your  letter  of  the  3d,  it  may  be  proper  to  remark,  for  your  information,  that  the  re­cruiting  service  has  never  been  less  successful  than  in  the  last  twelve  months,  and  especially  during  the·  past  summer.  The  whole  number  of  infantry  and  artillery  recruits  enlisted  for  the  general  service  in  the.  Eastern  department,  inclusive  of  the  1st  of  October,  is  but  585;  of  which  number  only  85  have  been  sent  to  any  Northern  station,  and  they  have  gone  to  the  Upper  Mississippi  for  the,  1st  regiment of  infantry  ;  252  re­cruits  have  been  assigned  to  companies  ordered  to  Florida  and  the  Creek  nation,  inclusive  of  the  month  of  June  ;  and  34  to  the  company  of  the  4th  infantry,  serving  in  the  Cherokee country,  at  Camp  Cass.

    On  the  19th  of  November,  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  reported  that  he  should  leave  New  Orleans  with  about  .90  recruits  for  the  4th  infantry  ; and  on  the  15th  of  that  month,  Colonel  Cutler  was  instructed,  as  you  have already  been  apprised,  to  detach  119  recruits  for  the  same  regiment  in  Florida,  as  soon  as  they  could  be  collected,  which  will  complete  its  estab­lishment.

    Of  the  173  infantry  recruits  enlisted  in  the  Western  department,  inclu­sive  of  October  1st,  149  have  been  sent to  the  4th  regiment  of  infantry  serving  in  Florida,  and  45  were  assigned  to  the  6th  infantry  when  ordered  from  Jefferson  barracks  to  the  frontiers  of  Louisiana.

    It will be seen by “general order” No.  80,  that  550  recruits  have  been  called  for,  for  the  artillery  companies  now  serving  in  Florida;  but  I  regret  to  add,  it  is  impossible  to  say  how  soon  this  reinforcement  may  reach  its  destination;  for  notwithstanding  the  continued  efforts  of  all  the  recruiting  officers  engaged  in  the  service,  the accession  of  numbers  for  the  foot  is  yet  slow.

    The  superintendent  has  been  instructed  to  send  off  detachments  in  small  parties  of  50  or  60  to  Florida,  without  detaining  them  for  greater  numbers.

    I  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  field  report  of  the  troops  at  Fort  Brooke,  Tampa  Bay,  on  the  3d  of November.  With  reference  to  the  sub­ject  of  field  returns,  I  respectfully  require  your  attention  to  my  letter  dated  the  3d  of  June,  and  would  now  ask  that  you  may  forward  such  monthly  returns,  if  it  be  practicable,  of  the  Tennessee  Volunteers,  and  of  the  volun­teers  or  militia  from  other  States  who  may  have  been  under  your  command  during  your  service  in  the  Creek  nation.  And  I  also  respectfully  request  that  monthly  returns  of  the  volunteer  force  now  serving  in  all  Florida,  distinguishing  the  States  and  Territories  to  which  they  severally belong,  may  be  forwarded  for  the  information  of  the  General-in-chief  and  War  Department,  with  as  little  delay  as  practicable.  These  returns  are  now  the  more  necessary,  as  full  returns  never  have  been  furnished  by  either of  your  predecessors  commanding  the  army,  either  in  the  Creek  or  Florida  campaigns.

    The  printed  blank  returns  furnished  yon  in  June  appear  not  to  have  been  used;  I,  nevertheless,  send  a  few more  of  the  same  description  for field  use.  

    I  do  not  speak  of  the  regular  force  ;  its  situation  and  condition  have  been,  generally,  regularly  reported.  Ian meeting  the  inquiries  of  the  Sec­retary  of  War,  as  to  the  volunteer  force  serving  in  Florida,  I  have  had  resort  to such  data  as  I  have  been  able  to  obtain,  relying  chiefly  on  the  muster-rolls  forwarded  by  the  mustering  officer  ,  but  I  have  no  assurance  that  the  rolls  of  all  companies  mustered  into  service  have  been  forwarded  to  the  Adjutant  General’s  office.  The  certainty  as  to  all  the  force  operating  in  the  field,  is  only  to  be  obtained  from  returns  forwarded  by  author­ity  of  the  Commanding  General.

    A  consolidated  general  field  return  of  all  the  force,  army,  marines,  vol­unteers,  and  Indians,  serving  in  Florida,  say  on  the  30th  of  November,  is  called  for  by  the Secretary  of  War,  which  it  is  hoped  it  may  be  in your  power  to  furnish,  although  I  am  well  aware,  for  want  of  a  proper  staff;  commanders  in  the  field  have  it not  in  their  power  always  to  com­ply  with  the  regulations  touching  reports,  returns,  &c.  ;  and  it  is  owing  to this  circumstance,  no  doubt,  that  general  headquarters  have  not  been  regu­larly  furnished d  with  copies  of  the  “orders”  and  ”  special  orders”  issued  by  you  (as  is  the  case  with  other  commanders)  while  in  command  in  thee Creek Nation.

    Nos.  49 to 57, inclusive, and No. 59,  are  n.11  that  have  been  received  at  this  office,  the  omitted  numbers  of  the  series  of  the  Creek  campaign  are  now  requested  to  be  forwarded,  as  soon  as  convenient,  for  the  information of  the  General-in-chief.

                                                                        I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Maj. Gen.  Thos. S.  Jesup,
            Commanding the army in Florida, Tampa Bay, Florida.

                                                         __________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, December 31, 1836.

    Sir:  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  the  following  communications  from  your  headquarters,  since  the  date  of  my  last  letter  of  December  5th.  I  enumerate  them  in  the  order  of  their  receipt,  viz  :

    1st,  Your  letter,  dated  Tampa  Bay,  November  20th,  referring  to  the  arrival  of  the  second  detachment  of  the  Alabama  battalion,  &c.,  received December  17th.

    2d.  Letter  dated  November  21st,  transmitting  copies  of  your  correspondence  with  the  late  Colonel  Walker, relative  to  a  mistake  in  a  report  of  Major  General  Scott,  &c.,  which,  agreeably  to  your  request,  are  placed  upon  the  files  of  the  office  ;  received  December  17th.  As  in  a  former  like  case,  respecting  mistakes  in  one  of  his  official  communications  from  Flor­ida,  I  have  on  this  occasion  forwarded  copies  of  these  papers  to  Major General  Scott.

     3d.  Letter  dated  November  18th,  reporting  your  readiness  to  take  the field,  but  delayed  for  the  want  of transportation,  and  reporting  the  arrival  of  the  last  detachment  of  the  Alabama  volunteers,  &c.  received  the  21stDecember.    

    4th.  Letter  of  November  27th,  from  Tampa  Bay,  transmitting  papers  in relation  to  the  election  of  Charles Irvine  to  be  captain  of  Washington  volunteers.

    5th.  Letter  of  November  28th,  from  Tampa  Bay,  reporting  the  embarkation  of  the  troops  for  the Withlacoochee,  &c

    6th.  Letter  dated  12th  December,  from  Volusia,  suggesting  the  ordering  the  6th  infantry  to  Florida,  reporting  the  near  approach  of  the  expiration  of  the  period  of  service  of  the  Tennessee  brigade,*  &c.  These  last  three  let­ters  were  respectively  received  on  the  24th  December.
__________________________________________________________________•  The  Secretary  of  War  having  understood  that  the  time  of  the  Tennessee  brigade  would  not  expire  until  the  lst  of  January,  when  making  out  his  annual  report,  inquired  of  me  if this  was  so.  To  which,  after  directing  the  examination  to  be  made,  I  answered  in  the  affirmative.  This,  however,  may  not  have  been exactly  correct  ;  for  all  though  the  official  brigade  return,  including  twenty  companies,  forwarded  by  Captain  Kingsley,  the  mustering  and  inspecting  officer,  specified  the  “1st  of  July,  1836,”  as  the  time  of  the  commencement  of  the  service  of  the  brigade  ;  yet  it  would  appear,  on  further  examination,  by  the  muster-rolls,  that  only  twelve  companies  would  continue  to  the  1st  and  2d  of  January,  1837,  four to  the  25th  of  December,  one  to  the  18th,  one  to  the  17th,  and  two  to  the  16th  of  the  same  month.

    7th.  Letter  dated  5th  December,  from  Volusia,  reporting  the  progress  of  your  operations,  and  your  having  joined  General  Call  on  the  night  of  the  4th  instant,  &c.,  received  30th  December,  (yesterday)

    These  several  communications  have  all  been  submitted  to  the  Secretary of  War,  and  subsequently  to  the  General-in-chief,  on  his  recent  return  to  headquarters.

    Copies  of  orders  and  instructions  directing  the  2d  regiment  of  dragoons  and  the  two  companies  of  artillery,  recently  organized  at  Forts  Hamilton  and  Monroe,  first  instructing  this  force  to  be  held  in  readiness  to  proceed  to  Florida  at  the  shortest  notice,  and  subsequently  directing  it  to  proceed  to  join  the  army  in  Florida  without  delay,  have  been  duly forwarded  from  this  office  for  your  information,  by  which  you  will  perceive,  that  your suggestions  touching  the  reinforcement  of  your  command  by  the  new  regiment  of  dragoons  had  been anticipated  by  the  Secretary  of  War.

    This  auxiliary  regular  force  will  consist  of  six  companies  of  dragoons  of  sixty  men  each,  and  two  full  companies  of  artillery – say  450  men.  Brevet  Lieutenant  Colonel  Fanning  has  been  ordered  to  conduct  this  de­tachment  to  the  seat  of  war,  and,  having  left  Washington  on  the  21st  instant  for  Fort  Monroe,  is  now,  it  is  supposed,  in  Charleston,  with  instructions  to  push  forward  the  companies  with  all  dispatch.  Those from New York sailed on the 28th.  Lieutenant  Colonel  Harney,  of  the  2d  dragoons,  arrived  yesterday  from  the  West,  and  departs  this  day  for  Florida,  as  will  also Major  Fauntleroy.  

On  the  23d  instant,  I  received  a  letter  from  the  Governor  of  South  Caro­lina,  transmitting  a  copy  of  your  communication  to  his  excellency,  dated  Volusia,  Florida,  December  9,  in  which  you  make  a  requisition  for  a  bat­talion  of  infantry  of  five  companies.  The  dispatch  was  promptly  laid  before  the  Secretary  of  War;  who having  approved  of  the  measure,  all  necessary  orders  were  immediately  communicated  to  the  proper  depart­ments  to  expedite  and  facilitate  the  mustering  into  the  service  of  this  force,  and  its  movement  to  Florida  in  the  direction  of  your  headquarters.

    I  herewith  respectfully  transmit  a  copy  of  my  communication  of  the  27th  instant,  addressed  to  Brevet Brigadier  General  Arbuckle,  the  officer  in  command  of  the  frontiers  of  Louisiana  and  Arkansas,  by  which  you  will  perceive  that  the  state  of.  the  service  in  that  quarter  does  not  justify  the  withdrawal  of  the  6th  regiment for  the  proposed  service  in  Florida;  and  accordingly,  the  Secretary  of  War  has  directed  the  countermarch  of  that  regiment,  should  it  have  been  put  in  motion  for  the  East,  by  orders  from any  quarter  ;  of  which circumstance,  however,  no  official  intelligence  has,  at  yet,  been  communicated  to  this  office  or  to  the  War  Department.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.                                                                                                                        R.  JONES.
Major General T.  S.  Jesup,
            Com’  army  in  Florida,  Fort  Drane.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT  GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  January  25,1837.

    Sm  :  In  reply  to  your  letter  of  the  27th  of  December,  relative  to  the  term  of  service  of  the  Washington  city  volunteers,  I  have  to  state,  that  it  was  understood  at  the  time  of  muster  into  service  that  they  were  to  serve for twelve  months,  unless  sooner  discharged.  .  ·

    The  muster-roll  of  the  company,  tendering  its  services,  was  sent  by  the·  officers  direct  to  the  President,  for  his  acceptance,  and  afterwards  to  the War  Department,  upon  which  the  men  were  mustered  into  service  ;  but the  roll  does  not  specify  the  time,  although  there  is  no  doubt,  as  before  mentioned,  that  it  was  for  twelve  months.

                                                                                                I  am,  sir,  &c. 
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Major General  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding,  &.c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida 

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  February  9,  1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  the  following  communications  from  your  headquarters,  since  the  date  of  my  letter  of  the  31st  December.’  I  enumerate  them  in  the  order  of  their  receipt, viz  :

    1st.  ”  General  orders,”  from  No.  20  to  30,  inclusive,  respectively  dated  the  8th,  10th,  10th,  11th,  19th,  21st,  23d,  24th,  27th,  28th,  and  30th  December  ;  received  January  19th.

    2d,  Your  letter  from  Tampa  Bay,  of  January  1st,  reporting  your  in­tention  to  join  the  troops  in  the  interior,  &c.  ;  received  January  23d.

    3d.  “General  orders”  Nos.  31,  32,  and  33,  dated,  respectively,  the  1st,  2d,  and  5th  of  January;  received  2d February.

    4th.  Letter  from  Fort  Armstrong,  Florida,  of  January  10th,  reporting  the  capture  of  sixteen  Indian  negroes,  &c.  ;  received  February  4th.

    5th.  Letter  from”  Ouithlacoochie,”  of  January  12th,  reporting  the  cap­ture  of  thirty-six  more  negroes,  and  your  intended  movements,  &c.  ;  received  February  4th  :  and,  also,  “general  orders”  No.  34,  35,  and  36,  dated,  respectively,  the  8th,  9th,  and  10th  of  January;  received  on  the same  day.  

    Forty  recruits  sailed  on  the  6th  instant  for  the  two  companies  of  the  2d  infantry,  under  Major  Dearborn.  It  was  not  known  that  his  command  had  been  ordered  from  Irwinton,  Georgia,  to  Florida,  until  the  receipt  of  your  order  No.  23,  of  the  11th  of  December,  on  the  19th  of  January.  On  the  23d  of  January,  113  recruits  for the  artillery  sailed  for  Tampa  Bay,  under  Captain  Mallory,  of  the  2d  regiment  of  artillery  ;  and  now  100  more  are  reported  by  Colonel  Cutler  to  be  ready.  This  detachment  will  be  commanded  by  First  Lieutenant  Johnson,  of  the  artillery,  who  will  enter  Florida  via  the  St.  John’s.  

    The  Secretary  of  War  entirely  approves  of  your  detaining  the  6th  in­fantry  in  Florida,  and  authorizes  you  to hold  it  under  your  command  as  long  as  you  may  deem  it  necessary.

    Your  letters  from  the  scene  of  your  operations,  respectively  dated  the  17th,  20th,  and  21st  of  January,  with “orders”·  Nos.  37,  38,  39,  40,  41,  and  42,  dated  16th,  16th,  17th,  18th,  19th,  and  20th,  have  this  day  been received,  and  submitted  to  the  Secretary  of  War,  I  also  acknowledge  the  .  receipt  of  a  letter  from  Colonel  Stanton,  from  Fort  Armstrong,  dated  Jan­uary  20th,  enclosing  “orders”  Nos.  I,  2,  3,  and  4,  respectively,  dated  the  9th,  10th,  11th,  and  12th  June,  1836, in  which  is  acknowledged  the  receipt.  of  my  letter  of  the  5th  December.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c 
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Brevet  Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida,

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  February  28,  1837.

    Sir  :    I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  your  communication  of  the  7th  instant,  reporting  the  recent  operations  of  the  army  in  Florida,  together  with  Colonel  Henderson’s  report  of  the  28th  of  January;  which  have  been  duly  submitted  to  the  Secretary  of  War  and  General-in-chief.

                                                                        I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES.
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida.

__________


                                                            ADJUTANT  GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  May  9,  1837.

    Sir  :  I  herewith,  by  direction  of  the  General-in-chief,  forward  a  copy  of  my  letter  of  this  date  to  Lieutenant  Colonel  Harney,  of  the  2d  dragoons,  on  the  subject  of  his  order  to  Captain  Gordon,  an  officer  serving  with  his company  at  the  time  in  Florida,  ‘to  leave  the  field  and  repair  to  Washington,  and  there  report  to  his  colonel.  The  General  desires  that  you  examine  into  this  procedure  of  Lieutenant  Colonel  Harney,  touching  the  matter, and  that  you  will  be  pleased  to  take  such  measures  in  the  case  as  due  regard  to  the  discipline  of  the  army  may  demand.

                                                                        I  am,  sir,  &c. 
                                                                                                R.  JONES.

Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,
            Commanding,  &c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, March 14, 1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  your  communications  of  the  13th  and  27th  February,  enclosing  “orders”  numbered  from  42  to  57, inclusive,  and  No.  59, and  “special orders,” from No. 1 to 18. I  have  received  your  letter  of  the  17th  February,  reporting  your  operations  since  the  7th,  together  with  an  extract  of  Lieutenant  Colonel  Fanning’s  report  of  the  affair  on  lake  Monroe,  which  have  been  duly  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief  and  Secretary  of  War,

    Lieutenant  Colonel  Farming’s  report  of  the  affair  of  the  morning  of  the  8th  of  February,  was  received  direct  from  him  on  the  28th  of  February.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c. 
                                                                                                R.  JONES.
Major  General  T.  S.  JESUP,
            Commanding the army, Florida.

__________


                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE, 
                                                                        Washington,  March  14,  1837.  

    Sir  :  The  Chief  Engineer  has  reported  to  the  Secretary  of  War  that  the  dredgeboat  belonging  to  the  Engineer  department,  and  intended  to  be used  in  the  improvement  of  the  inland  pass  between  the  St.  Mary’s and St. John’s  rivers,  has  been  removed  for  the  purpose  of  deepening  the  chan­nel  near  lake  George.  The  Secretary  now  directs  that  said  boat,  after  effecting  the  latter  object,  be  returned  to  its  proper  position,  in  good  order,  without  expense  to  the  appropriation  for  the  above-mentioned  improvement.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Major General T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Fort Armstrong, Garey’s Ferry, Florida.

__________


                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, March.  18, 1837

    Sir  :  Your  communication  of  the  25th  February,  detailing  your  recent  conference  with  the  Indians,  and  your  contemplated  operations,  has  this  day  been  received,  and  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief.  

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.                                                                                                                                    R.  JONES. Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,
            Commanding  at  Fort  Dade,  Florida

__________


                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,
                                                                        Washington, March 22, 1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  orders  num­bered  from.  5  to  70,  of  the  series  issued  during  the  campaign  against  the  Creek  Indians  in  1836,  under  cover  of  Lieutenant  Chambers’s  letter  of  the  25th  of  February;  and,  with  the  exception  of  order  No.  62, your orders Nos. 60  and  61,  and  special  orders from  19  to  39,  inclusive,  of  the  series  of  the  Seminole  campaign  ;  and,  also,  your  communication  of  the  1st  of  March,  enclosing  the  letter  of  Colonel  Henderson,  in  favor  of  Captain  Howle,  &c. All  of  which  have  been  duly  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief.  

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.                                                                                                                        R.  JONES.
Major  General  T.  S.  Jessup,
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida,  Fort  Dade.

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,                                                                                     Washington,  March  23,  1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  the  satisfaction  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  official  despatch  of  the  6th  instant,  from  Fort  Dade,  announcing  the  successful  termination  of  the  Seminole  campaign,  together  with  a  copy  of  the  arti­cles  of’  capitulation,  by  which  it  is  seen  that  the  Indians  are  immediately  to  emigrate  to  the  country  assigned  to  them  west  of  the  Mississippi,  by  the  treaty  of  Payne’s  Landing.  The documents have been laid before the General-in-chief,  and  I  congratulate  you  and  the  gallant  army  under  your  command  on  the  termination  of  Indian  hostilities  in  Florida.  ·  I  hope  that  matters  there  will  soon  be  settled,  arid  that  your  companions  may speedily  return  in  health  and  happiness  to  their  families  and  stations.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c. 
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Major  General  T,  S.  Jesup
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida,  Fort  Dade.

__________

                                                ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  March  24,  1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  “orders”  numbered  from  71  to  90,  of  the  series  issued  during  the  campaign  against  the  Creek  Indians  in  1836,  under  cover  of  Lieutenant  Chambers’s  letter  of  the  5th  instant.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c. 
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Major General T.  S.  Jesup,  
            Commanding in Florida.

__________


                                                            ADJUTANT  GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  April  5,  1837.

    Sir  :  I  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  “orders”  numbered  from  91  to  101,  of  the  series  issued  during  the  campaign  against  the  Creek  Indians  in  1836,  under  cover  of  Lieutenant  Chambers’s  letter  of  the  10th  March;  and,  also,  your  letter  of  the  11th  of  the  same  month,  transmitting  the  pro­ceedings  of  a  board  of  officers  in relation  to  the  death  of  Sergeant  Edward  Silk,  late  of  company  H,  6th  infantry:  which  have  been  duly  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Major General T. S.  Jesup,
            Commanding the army in Florida, Fort Dade.

__________


                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                                    Washington,  April  6,  1837.

  Sir :  Your  despatch  of  the  18th  March  from  Fort  Dade,  with  the  document  therewith,  signed  by  the  chief,  Micanopy,  assenting  to  the  articles  of  the  treaty  entered  into  with  the  chief  of  the  Seminoles,  and  in  relation  to other  Indian  matters,  has  been  received  and  submitted  to  the  Secretary  of  War  and  General-in-chief.  As  soon  as  I  am  authorized  to  give  a  specific  answer  to  your  suggestions  respecting  the  officers  named  for  Indian  ser­vice, &c.,  it  shall  be  despatched.

    I  acknowledge  also  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  16th  March  enclosing  copies  of  your  official  letters  from  the  10th  of  September  to  the  6th  of  October,  which  shall  be  placed  on  the  files  of  the  Adjutant  General’s office.

    Two  letters  from  your  aid,  Lieutenant  Chambers,  dated  12th  and  19th  Match,  respectively,  transmitting  your  special  orders  from  1  to  71,  inclu­sive,  issued  in  the  Creek  nation  in  1836,  and  copies  of  your  official  letters  from  the  6th  of  October  to  the  7th  of  November,  1836,  were  also  received by  the  last  mail.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c. 
                                                                                                            R.  JONES. Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Fort  Dade,  Florida.


__________


                                                            ADJUTANT  GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  April  10,  1837.

    Sir  :  The  General-in-chief  having  examined  the  proceedings  of  the  board  of  officers  ordered  to  inquire  into  and  ascertain  the  causes  which  led  to  the  death  of  Sergeant  Edward  Silk,  of  the  6th  infantry,  considers  it  proper  to  deliver  the  soldier  who  caused  the  death  of  the  sergeant  to  the  civil  authority  for  trial.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                            R.  JONES. General  Jesup;
            Commanding,  &c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  April  15,  1837.

    Sir:  The  Commissary  General  of  Subsistence  having  called  for  an  offi­cer  for  duty  in  his  department  at  Key  West,  should  the  company  which  has  been  designated  (Brevet  Major  Childs’s,  3d  artillery)  as  a  garrison  for that  station  at  the  close  of  the  campaign  be  not  soon  ordered  thither,  you  will  in  that  event  please  direct  one  of  the  subalterns  to  repair  to  the  station  for  duty  there,  as  requested  by  General  Gibson.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                            R.  JONES. Thomas S. Jesup,
            Major General, Commanding, &c., Tampa Bay, Fl.

__________

                                                ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, April 17, 1837.

    Sir :  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  the.  receipt  of  your  commu­nication  of  the  26th  March,  reporting.  the  arrival  of  many  of  the  Seminoles  at  Tampa.  Bay, &c., which was duly submitted to the General-in-chief.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES.
Major  General  T.  S. Jesup,
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida,  Tampa  Bay,

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  April  24,  1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  the  receipt,  on  the  22d  instant,  of  the  returns  of  the  regular  and militia  forces  respectively  under  your  command,  in  Florida,  according  to  the  strength  exhibited  on  the  28th  of  February;  and  copies  of  your  official  letters  from  the  15th  January  to  6th  March,  inclusive,  under  cover  of  Lieutenant  Chambers’s  letters  of  the  28th  and  31st  March.  I  have  also  received  your  letter  of  the  28th  of  the  same  month,  reporting  an  omission  in  your  report  of  the  affair  of  the  27th  Jan­uary,  at  the  Halchee  Lustee,  and  that  of  the  29th,  with  Colonel  Hender­son’s  letter  of  the  29th  of  March,  correcting  his  report  of  the  28th  Janu­ary:  all  of  which  have  been  duly  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief,  and  will  be  placed  on  the  files  of  this  office.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                    R.  JONES:
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,
            Commanding  the  army,  Fort  Dade,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, April 26, 1837.

  Sir  :  On  referring  to  the  records,  I  find  that  I  have·  omitted  to  acknowl­edge  the  receipt  of  “orders”  from  62  to  71,  inclusive,  and  “special  orders”  from  40  to  51,  inclusive,  issued  from  your  headquarters.  These  were  duly  received  on  the  12th  instant,  and  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES. 
Major  General  Jesup,
            Commanding,  c&·c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

NOTE. – I  have  also  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  copies  of”  orders”  from  your  headquarters  from  72  to  80,  inclusive,  and  also  copies  of  your  official  letters  between  the  6th  and  19th  March,  1837,  under  cover  of  Lieutenant  Chambers’s  letter  of  the  1st  instant.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL”S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  May  10,  1837.

    Sir  :  Your  letter  of  the  23d  April,  transmitting  a  paper  concerning  the  refusal  of  the  Florida  volunteers  to  obey  their  commander,  with  a  request  that  it  be  placed  on  file  in  this  office,  has  been  received.

    This  has  been  done,  and  the  letter  on  Indian  affairs  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES.  
Major  General  T.  S.  Jessup
            Tampa Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANTS GENERALS OFFICE,
                                                                                    Washington, May 20, 1837

Sir:  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  from  your  head­quarters  of “orders”  No.  81  to  99,  inclusive; also,”special  orders”  from  52  to  68;  copies  of  letters  from  the  3d  to  the  24th  of  April,  inclusive  ;  and  sundry courts-martial  proceedings  in  cases  of  soldiers  in  Alabama  and  Florida.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES.
Major  General  T.  S.  Jessup,
            Commanding  the  army,  &·c.,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE
                                                                        Washington, May 31, 1837

    Sir  .:  I  acknowledge  your  communication  of  the  8th  instant,  (received  at  the  office  during  a  temporary  absence,)  which  reports  that  Powell  and  other  Seminole  chiefs  had  surrendered  at  Fort  Mellon,  and  were  soon  ex­pected  to  arrive  at  Tampa  Bay.  With  reference  to  your  very  just  re­marks  relative  to  absent  officers,  I  may  here  repeat  what  I  had  occasion  to  say  to  Governor  Call  in  my  letter  of  the  25th  of  July,  1836,  which,  in  substance,  is  :  That  it  would  be  seen  the  subject  had  not  been  overlook­ed  in  this  office  ;  that  I  had  frequently taken  special  care  to  well  inform  the  proper  authorities  of  the  great  deficiency  of  officers  for  duty  in  the  field,  &c.  ;  and  that  other  public  interests  besides  the  army  being,  it  was said,  entitled  also  to  consideration,  I  did not  see  that  the  evil  was  likely  soon  to  be  remedied,  severely  as  it  was  felt,  and  as  often  as  it  had  been complained  of,  by  the  comparatively  few  officers  serving  with  the  troops  and  the  commanders  in  the  field,  &c.  No  officer,  not  serving  in  the  field,  more  sensibly  feels,  in  the  execution  of  his  official  duties,  the  inconve­nience,  and  no  one  more  deeply  regrets  the  continuance,  of  a  system  which  abstracts  so  large  a  portion  of  officers  from  duty  with  their  companions,  than  I  do  ;  and  the  records  abundantly  show  the  reiterated  efforts and  measures  which  have  been  attempted  at  this  office  to  afford  service  in  the  line  the  requisite  relief.  But  I  have  recently  been  forced  to  come  to  the  conclusion  that  these  efforts  are  of  little  or  no  avail,  and  that  it  would  be  even  more  agreeable  to  my  superiors  that  I  should  desist  from  a  repetition  of  them.  I  have, therefore,  considered  it  most  proper  on  my  part  to  say  nothing  more  touching  the  subject  of  absent  officers,  or  as  respects  the  mode  of  applying  for  and  making  the  selections,  (I  cannot  call  it  details.)  when  called  for  and ordered  on  detached  service.  All  that  the  Adjutant  General  can  now  do,  as  to  your  request  touching  the  subject  of  absent  officers,  is.to  repeat  to  you  what,  on  a  like  occasion,  I  informed  Colonel  Lindsay  in  my  letter  of  the  22d  May,  1835,  to  wit:  “and  all  I  can  do  in  this  instance  is,  to  lay  your  letter  before  the  General-in-chief,” &c.  On  this  occasion  I  would  respectfully  refer  you to  my  communication  on  the  same subject,  dated  10th  August,  1836.  

    As  respects  the  short  leave  of  absence  (three  months)  granted  to  Cap­tain  Mallory, on  the  tender  of  his  resignation,  when  he  solicited  a  much  greater  period  of  indulgence,  there  was  no  knowledge  at  general headquarters  that  he  had  given  any  assurance  of  his  immediate  exit  from  the  service  ;  and  it  being  seen  that  he  withdrew  from  the  army  on  the  sur­geon’s  certificate  of  disability,  and,  moreover,  as  he  had  long  and  faithfully  served  in  the  army,  the  three  months’  leave  granted  him  was  deemed  to  be  only  reasonable.  Should  he  not  proceed  to  join  his  company  at  its  expiration,  of  course  his  resignation  must  take  effect.

    I  respectfully  request  your  attention  to  the  condition  of  Captain  Van  Ness’s  company  (H)  of  the  1st  artillery.  The  colonel  (General  Eustis)  reports  that,  in  consequence  of  the  failure  of  the  company  commander  (if  any there  be)  to  forward  the  company  monthly  returns,  he  has  been  unable  to  complete  the  monthly  regimental  returns  ;  and  this  is  the  case  with  all  his  returns  received  since,  and  inclusive  of,  December  last.  I  will, therefore,  thank  you  to  take  the  proper  measures  which  may  ensure  the  transmittal  to  this  office,  and  to  the  headquarters  of  the  regiment,  proper  returns  of  the  company  for  each  month  respectively,  inclusive  of  December,  1836,  to  supply  the  present  deficiencies  in  the  records.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c
                                                                                                R.  JONES.

Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida,  Fort  Dade.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, June  2, 1837,

Sir  :  I  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  the  continuation  of  the  series  of  your  “orders”  and  “special  orders,”  from No.  100  to  106  of  the  former,  and  from  69  to  72,  inclusive,  of  the  latter.

Also,  copies  of  your  official  letters,  inclusive  of  the  13th  and  15th  of  May;  also,  sundry  letters  and  papers  setting  forth  the  reasons  for  grant­ing  leaves  of  absence  to  the  following-named  officers,  to  wit  :  Lieutenant  Colonel  Crane,  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster,  Lieutenant  Colonel  Fanning;  Captains  Lyon,  Hutter,  Mallory,  Demick;  Lieutenants  Dusenbury,  Kennedy,  Rose,  Allen,  Donaldson;  Doctor  Martin  and  Lieutenant  Mad­dox,  of  the  Washington  volunteers:  all  of  which  have  been  laid  before  the General-in-chief.

                                                                                    I am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES.
Major General T.  S.  JESUP,
            Commanding the army, Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT  GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  June 8,  1837,

    GENERAL:  The resignation of Lieutenant R.  C.  Smead,  4th  artillery,  dated,  Fort  Call,  Florida,  May  6,  having been  forwarded  by  your  direc­tion,  under  cover  of  Aid-de-camp  Chambers’s  communication  of  May  12;  and  the  same  having  been  accepted  and  subsequently  revoked,  I  enclose, herewith,  for  your  information,  copies  of  the  official  letters  written upon the  subject.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES.
Bvt.  Major  Gen.  T.  S.  Jessup,
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, June 8, 1837.

    GENERAL  :  Your  communications,  under  date  of  the  5th  and  17th  ulti­mo,  in  relation  to  the  scarcity  of  field  and  medical  officers  under  your  command,  and  the  tardy  movements  of  the  Indians,  were  both  received  on  the  5th  instant,  and  have  been  submitted  to  the  General-in-Chief.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES. 
Bvt.  Major  Gen.  T.  S.  Jessup,
            Commanding army,  &·c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, June 10, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  copies  of  sundry  official  let­ters,  dated  from  the  5th  to  the  28th  of  June,  1836,  inclusive,  (relating  to  your  late  Creek  operations  in  Georgia  and  Alabama,)  which  were  received  on  the  7th,  under  cover  of  your  communications  of  the  20th  and  21st  ultimo,  and  have  been  placed  on  file.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES. 
Major  Gen.  Jessup,
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, June 17, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  copies  of  sundry  official  let­ters,  dated  from  the  30th  June  to  9th  July,  1836,  inclusive,  (Creek  cam­paign;)  and  also  copies  of  your  correspondence,  dated  from  the  15th  to  the  25th  May,  1837,  inclusive,  with  copies  of  orders  from  No.  107  to  112,  inclusive,  received  on  the  15th  instant: all  of  which  have  been  laid  before  the  General-in-chief.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES. 
Major  Gen.  T.  S.  JESUP,
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

NOTE, – Your  communication  of  the  23d  of  May,  enclosing  the  report  of  Major  Wilson,  has  this  day  been  received  and  submitted.

__________

                                                ADJUTANT  GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  June  19,  1837.

    Sir:  Your  communication  of  the  5th  instant,  reporting  that  the  Seminole  Indians  had  failed  to  emigrate  to  the West,  and  that  the  campaign  has  ter­minated  for  the  season,  has  been  submitted  to  the  Secretary  of  War  and  General-in-chief.  In  expressing  the  regret  which  is  felt  by  us  all,  on  re­ceiving  this  intelligence  of  the  bad  faith  of  the  Seminoles,  I  feel  assured,  general,  that  your  indefatigable  exertions,  the  proper  measures  adopted  and  zealously  pursued  by  yon,  deserved  the  successful  issue  heretofore  expected  and  hoped  for.

    I  shall,  agreeably  to  your  request,  remind  the  Secretary  and  General-in­chief  of  your  desire  to  be  relieved  from  the  command.

                                                                                    I  am,  general,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES.
Major  Gen.  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida,  Fort  Brooke.

NOTE, – Please send me consolidated returns of the army.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, July 1,  1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  copies  of  sundry  of  your  of­ficial  letters,  dated  from  the  10th  of  July  to  the 17th  of  August,  1836,  in­clusive,  (Creek  campaign;)  copies  of  “orders”  from  No.  113  to  115,  “special  orders”  from  No.  73  to  78,  present  series,  inclusive;  and  your  com­munication  of  the  5th  June,  transmitting  the  application  of  Major  Thomp­son  for  leave  of  absence:  all  of  which  have  been  laid  before  the  General­-in-chief

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES. 
Major  Gen.  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding  the  army,  Florida,  Tampa  Bay.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, July 11, 1837.

    Sir:  Your  letter  of  the  17th  of  June,  reporting  your  intended  move­ments,  and  suggesting  the  needful  preparations  for  the  service  in  Florida,  &c.,  was  received  on  the  5th  of  July,  during  my  temporary  absence  from  the  office.  On  laying  the  same  before  the  General-in-chief,  and  conversing  with  him  upon  the  various topics  mentioned,  I  perceive  that  it  had  already  been  before  him,  and  been  answered  in  his  own  proper  name  on  the  6th  instant.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R,  JONES. 
Major Gen.  T.  S.  Jesup,
            Commanding, &·c., Black Creek, Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, July 14, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge,  under  cover  of  your  letter  of  the  22d  ultimo,  copies  of  your  official  correspondence  during  the  Creek  campaign,  elated  from  the  17th  to  the  29th  of  August,  1S3G,  inclusive,  which have  been  placed  on  the  files  of  the  office.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES. 
Major  Gen.  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, July 15, 1837.

    Sir:  Captain  Crossman  this  morning  informed  me  that  you  had  ·not  received  a  copy  of  the  Revised  Regulations  for  the  army.  The  object  of  this  is  to  state,  that  at  the  time  they  were  issued  a  supply  sufficient  for  the  several  officers  of  the  Quartermaster  General’s  department.  was  furnished  to  the  acting  Quartermaster  General,  with  a  view  to  their  direction  and  distribution;  but  it  seems,  on  inquiry,  that  the  copy  designed  for  you  was  not  forwarded.  You  will  please  to  keep  the  copy  which  Captain  Crossman  says  he  left  in  your  possession,  he  having  been  supplied  with  another from  this  office.  

    Copies  of  the  Regulations  for  many  officers  in  Florida  are  yet  retained  in  this  office,  lest  they  may  not  reach  their  destination.  They  are  only  forwarded  from  time  to  time,  as  I  am  assured  of  the  officers’  posts.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES. 
Major  Gen.  T.  S.  Jesup,
            Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

    NOTE, – I,  however,  had  been  under  the  impression  that  you  had  been  furnished  direct  from  this  office,  as  a commanding  general  in  the  field,  and  knew  not  to  the  contrary  until  this  morning.                                          R.  J.

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, July 21, 1837.

    Sir:  Your  communication  of  the  10th  instant,  on  the  subject  of  the  re­duced  strength  of  the  companies  serving  iii  Florida,  and  of  the  want  of  recruits  to  fill  them,  has  this  day  been  received;  and  I  am  happy  to  inform  you that  efficient  measures  have  some  time  since  been  adopted,  which  it  is  believed  will  ensure  an  adequate  supply for  the  several  regiments  that  may  take  the  field  in  October,  should  hostilities  against  the  Seminoles  be  then renewed.  The  concentration  and  instruction  of  recruits  at  Fort  Monroe,  as  you  will  have  seen  by  “general  order”  No.  43, dated 24th.  June, l837, has  direct  reference  to  the  Florida  service.  Already  there  are near  500  men  assembled,  and  in  a  few  weeks  more  there  will  not  be  less  than  1,000,  and  probably  by  the  middle  of  September  more  than  1,500.  At the date of “general order”  No.  39, (June  13,  the  order  countermanded  by  No.  43,)  there  was  every  reason  to  believe  that  the  war  in  Florida  was  certainly  at  an  end;  and  hence  it  was  then deemed  inexpedient  to  order  recruits  thither  at  such  a  season,  when  most  of  the  regiments  there  were  expected soon  to  be  withdrawn  and  remanded  to  their  permanent stations.

    Should  you  deem  it  necessary  to  fill  the  ranks  of  any  particular  companies  quartered  at  comparatively  salubrious  stations,  earlier  than  Octo­ber,  your  wishes,  on  being  communicated,  would  doubtless  be  complied with.  I  mention  this,  that  you  may  be  apprised  of  the  intention  of  the  Department  not  to  order  the  recruits  to Florida  at  an  earlier  day  than  would  be  necessary  to  resume  your  military  operations  in  the  autumn;  and  which may  also  supersede  the  necessity  of  consolidating  companies,  as  suggested  in  your  communication  ;  which measure,  the  General-in-chief  would  prefer  should  not  be  adopted  whenever  avoidable  .

                                                                                                I  am,  sir,  &c. 
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Major  Gen.  T.  S.  Jesup, 
 Commanding, &c., St. Augustine, Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  August  12,  1837.

    Sir:  I  acknowledge  the  receipt,  at  this  office,  on  the  24th  ultimo,  of  copies  of  your  official  correspondence,  from  the  27th  of  May  to  the  15th  of  June,  and  from  the  15th  to  the 25sth  of  June  ;  and,  on  the  2d  instant,  further  copies  of  the  same,  from  the  20th  of  June  to  the  24th  of  July;  also,  on  the  2d  instant,  copies  of  “orders”  No.  126 to No. 141;  and,  on  the  5th  instant,  orders  from  No. 142 to  No  153,  and.  special No.  87 to  97.

    With  respect  to  the  transmittal  of  copies  of  your  orders  and  special  orders,  I  respectfully  request  that,  whenever  practicable,  these  may  be  forwarded  within  a  day  or  two  after  their  respective  dates;  as  the  official  information  thus  communicated,  touching  the  disposition  of  troops,  and  the  movement  and  change  of  station  of the  officers,  is  often  very  useful,  and  sometimes  important  to  be  known  at  general  headquarters  at  the  shortest interval  after  the  issuing  of  such  orders.

                                                                                                I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                            R.  JONES.
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, August 19, 1837.

    Sir  :  Your  communications,  respectively  dated  the  24th,  25th,  and  26th  July,  have  been  received,  and  duly  submitted  to  the  Secretary  of  War;  and  will  be  laid  before  the  General-in-chief  on  his  return  to  headquarters.  Your  suggestions  relative  to  the  recruiting  service  have  been attended  to,  by  giving  the  necessary  instructions  to  establish  additional  rendezvous  in  the  country,  including  two  or  three  to  be  opened  in  the  upper  part  of  the States  of  North  and  South  Carolina.  The  pressure  of  the  times,  to  which  you  advert,  is  but  little  felt,  if  any,  in  the  interior;  and  we  find  that  our  success  in  obtaining  recruits  is,  for  the  most  part,  confined  to  the  large  cities and  parts  of  the  country  thickly  populated  in  manufacturing  districts.  The  selections  you  propose,  to  fill  up  Captain  Ringgold’s  company,  I  think  can  be  best  made  on  the  arrival  of  any  body  of  recruits  in  that  section  of  Florida  in  which  the  captain,  with  his  company,  may  be  serving.

   You  will  please  to  give  the  necessary  orders.  We  have  about  one  thousand  recruits  under  instructions  at  Fort Monroe.

                                                                                                I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                            R.  JONES. 
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  August  21,  1837.

   
 Sir  :  1  have  the  pleasure  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  2d  instant,  enclosing  the  copy  of  a report  from  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield,  of  the  Alabama  volunteers,  dated  July  15,  1837,  and  copy  of  a  letter from  Captain  L.  H.  Galt,  dated  July  24,  1837  ;  all  of  which  have  been  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief.

                                                                                                I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                            R.  JONES. 
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,
Commanding,  &·c.,  Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, August 24, 1837.

    Sir  :  Your  several  communications  from  Garey’s  Ferry,  respectively  da­ted  the  6th,  (two,)  7th,  and  13th  instant,  with  the  accompanying  documents,  have  been  duly  received,  and  submitted  to  the  General-in-chief.  With  regard  to  the  establishment  of  clothing·  depots  in  Florida,  I  have  the  pleasure  to  say  that  the  subject  has  been anticipated,  and  your  wishes  fully  met,  as  you  will  see  by  general  orders  No.  52,  dated  16th  instant,  a  duplicate  of  which  is  herewith  respectfully  transmitted.

                                                                                                I  am,  sir,  &c. 
                                                                                                            R.  JONES. 
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington,  September  1,  1837.

    Sir:  Your  letter  of  the  28th  July,  in  relation  to  the  accounts  of  Lieutenant  George  Watson,  1st  artillery,  acting  commissary  of  subsistence, with  his  accompanying  explanatory  communication,  has  been  received,  and  referred  to  the  Commissary  General  of  Subsistence,  who  states  that  the  explanations  are  perfectly  satisfactory.  The  order  of  July  5th,  direct­ing  him  to  be  relieved,  is  accordingly  considered  as  revoked.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES. Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,
            Commanding,  &·c.,  Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,  
                                                                        Washington, September 6, 1837.

    GENERAL  :  The  proceedings  of  the  general  court-martial  in  the  case  of  private  Robert  Hayland,  .2cl  regiment  dragoons,  received  under  cover  of  your  communication  of  the  31st  July,  have  been  submitted  to  the General-in-chief  and  Secretary  of  War.

    The  proceedings  are  herewith,  by  direction  of  the  Secretary  of  War,  respectfully  returned;  who  recommends that  the  court  may  be  recon­vened,  and  its  .findings  and  sentence  be  reconsidered,  as  these  are  deemed  to  be  inconsistent  with  the  law.  If  the  court  were  of  the  opinion  that  the  prisoner  ought  to  suffer  death,  it  would seem  that  he  should  have  been  convicted  of  the  crime  as  specified  in  the  charge,  since  the  sentence pronounced  in  the  case  does  not  appear  to  be  sanctioned  by  the  7th  article  of  the  Rules  and  Articles  of  War, in  which  are  not  to  be  found  the  words “mu­tinous  conduct;”  the  modified  crime  substituted  by  the  court  in  its  find­ings  for  the  charge  of  “mutiny.”  But,  if  the  court  persist  in  its  findings,  then  the  punishment  to  be  awarded  in  the  case  should  only  equal  the  meas­ure  of  the  crime  so  modified.

    The  case  appears  to  be  an  aggravated  one,  and  the  discipline  and  the  good  of  the  service  require  that  such  an  offender  should  not  escape  the  just  punishment  his  high  demerit  would  seem  to  demand.  It  is  not  a  lit­tle surprising  that  the  court  should  have  awarded  the  highest  punishment  known  to  our  military  code,  while  it  would  not  admit  that  the  prisoner  had  been  guilty  of  a  crime  of  the  highest  order.

                                                                                    I  am,  sir,  &c.
                                                                                                R.  JONES 
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,  
            Commanding  the  army  in  Florida,  Garey’s  Ferry.

.__________

Copies  of  letters  .from  the  Secretary  of  War  to  Major  General  Thomas  S.  Jesup,  in  relation  to  the  Florida  war, from  November  4,  1836,  to  October  4,  1S37,  inclusive.

                                                WAR DEPARTMENT, November 4, 1836.

    Sir.  Before  this  communication  reaches  you,  you  will  have  become  fully  acquainted  with  the  retrograde  movements  of  Governor  Call,  and  the  other  events  connected  therewith,  which  have  recently  occurred  in  Florida.  These  circumstances  have,  for  a  time,  suspended  offensive  operations  ;  and,  from  the  feeble  state  of  Governor  Call’s  health,  it  is  to  be  feared  that  he  will  not  be  able  to  prosecute  the  campaign,  when  resumed,  with  that  promptitude  and  energy  which  the  crisis  demands.  The  Presi­dent  has  therefore  determined  to  commit  to  you  the  command  of  the  army  serving  in  Florida,  and  the  general  direction  of  the  war  against  the Seminoles.

    Yon  will  accordingly,  on  the  receipt  of  this  communication,  should  you then  be  at  Governor  Call’s  headquarters,  (and,  if  not,  so  soon  as  you  can  reach  there,  or  can  communicate  with  him.)  assume the command  of  all the  forces  in  the  Territory.

    The  hostile  Indians  having  been  discovered  in  considerable  force  on  the banks  of  the  Withlacoochee,  audit having  been  also  ascertained  that  their  principal  camps  and  settlements  are  situated  on  the  south  side  of  that river,  you  will  immediately  make  all  suitable  arrangements  for  a  vigorous  attack  upon  their  strongholds,  and  for  penetrating  and  occupying  the  whole  country  between  the  Withlacoochee  and  Tampa  Bay.  With  a  view  to  this end,  you  will  first  establish  posts  at  or  near  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee,  at  Fort  King,  and  at  Volusia  ; and  you  will  take  the  proper  measures  for  securing,  through  them,  the  safety  of  the  frontier.  You  will,  also,  through  the  same  posts,  and  by  such  means  of  transporta­tion  as  may  be  most  certain  and  economical,  make  permanent  arrange­ments  for  procuring  sufficient  and  regular  supplies.  So  soon  as  those  dispositions  shall  be  completed,  yon  will  concentrate  all  your  disposable  forces,  and  proceed,  without  delay,  to  cross  the  With1acoochee,  and  to  possess  yourself  of  the  positions  now  occupied  by  the  Indians  ;  attacking  and  routing  them  in  their  strongholds,  and  scouring  the  whole  country between  the  Withlacoochee  and  Tampa  Bay.  

    Should  you  succeed  in  bringing  the  Indians  to  a  general  engagement, and  in  defeating  them  therein,  the  ready  submission  of  the  tribe  may  probably  be  expected.  If,  however,  they  should  abandon  their  present  position  on  the  Withlacoochee  before  you  reach  it,  or  you  should  drive  them  from  it,  without  entirely  subduing  them,  you  will  then  take  such  advanced  positions  to  the  south  of  Volusia,  and  to  the  east  and  south  of  Tampa  Bay,  as  the  nature  of  the  country  may  admit,  and  push  from  them  such  further  operations  as  may  be  necessary  to  the most  speedy  and effectual  subjugation  of  the  enemy.

    The  above  direction  to  attack  the  enemy  in  his  strongholds;  and  to  possess  yourself  of  the  country  between the  Withlacoochee  and  Tampa  Bay,  yon  will  regard  as  a  positive  order,  to  be  executed  at  the  earliest  practi­cable  moment.  In  other  respects,  you  will  exercise  a  sound  discretion,  and  will  adopt  such  measures  as  you may  deem  best  calculated  to  protect  the  frontiers,  and  to  effect  the  subjugation  and  removal  of  the  Indians.

    Great  confidence  being  reposed  in  your  prudence,  energy,  and  skill,  it  is  deemed  unnecessary  to  urge  you  to promptitude  or  activity,  or  to  im­press  on  you  the  importance  of  early  and  frequent  communications.

                                                                                                B.  F.  BUTLER.

    P.  S.  Since  preparing  the  foregoing  despatch,  your  letters  to  the  Adju­tant  General,  of  the  16th  and  17th ultimo,  announcing  your  arrival  at  Tampa  Bay,  and  your  intended  departure  on  the  18th,  with  three  com­panies  of  artillery,  to  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee,  in  order  to  join  the  Indian  warriors  at  that  place,  have  reached  here.  These  despatches, though  they  excite  some  apprehensions  as  to  the  safety  of  your  detach­ment,  do  not make  it  necessary  to  alter  the  above.  I  have  also  just  received,  and  enclose  for  your  perusal  and  consideration,  a  memorandum  from  the  acting  Quartermaster  General,  prepared  in  reply  to  certain  inqui­ries  made  by  me,  in respect  to  the  best  mode  of  transporting  supplies,  &c.  in  Florida.  The  President  concurs,  in  general,  in  the views  stated  in  this  pt1.per,  and  it  may,  perhaps,  furnish  some  suggestions  which  may  be  of  service  to  you  hereafter.

                                                                                                B.  F.  BUTLER,  
                                                                                    Secretary of War ad interim,
Major General Thomas S.  Jesup, 
            United States army,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, November 5, 1836.

  Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  enclose  duplicates  of  a  despatch,  and  accom­panying  paper,  transmitted  to  you  yesterday  via  Charleston,  Black  creek,  and  the  headquarters  of  General  Call.

  Learning,  by  a  communication  this  day  received  by  the  acting  Quarter­master  General,  that,  in  consequence  of  the  state  of  affairs  referred  to  in  the  enclosed,  you  had  repaired  to  St.  Mark’s,  Captain  Canfield,  the  bearer  hereof,  has  been  directed  to  proceed  express  to  that.  post,  for  the  purpose  of  giving  you  the  earliest  information  of  the  duties  assigned  to  you.

  All  needful  measures,  in  regard  to  supplies,  officers,  and  surgeons,  within  the  control  of  this  Department,  have  already  been  taken  in  com­pliance  with,  or  in  anticipation  of,  your  various  suggestions  on  those subjects.

                                                                                                B.  F.  BUTLER, 
                                                                                    Secretary of War ad interim 
Major General Thomas S.  Jesup, 
            St.  Mark’s, Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, January 4, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  herewith  to  transmit  to  you  a  printed  copy  of  the  documents  accompanying  the President’s  message,  among  which  you  will  find  the  annual  report  from  this  Department.  In  that  document  you  will  perceive  that  I  have  recommended  an  increase  of  the  pay  of  all  offi­cers  below  the  grade  of  colonel.  My  attention  had  been  called  to  the  subject  before  I  had  the  honor  to  receive  your  communication  of  the  31st  of October,  enclosing  the  letter  from  the  officers  of  the  army  under  your  command  ;  but  the  representations  in those  papers  had  justly  much  influ­ence  in  determining  me  to  bring  the  matter  before  the  President  and  the Legislature.

    The  suggestion,  as  to  the  justice  of  granting  a  land  bounty  to  all  the  officers  and  men  who  shall  have  served  in  Florida,  meets  my  entire  con­currence  ;  but,  as  such  a  proposal  will  be  much  more  likely  to  pass  after  the  conclusion  of  the  war  than  at  the  present  session,  I  deem  it  most  useful  to  all  concerned  not  to  propose  it  now.

    The  request  for  a  modification  of  general  order  No.  58  will  receive  due  consideration,  and  the  result  will  be communicated  to  yourself.

                                                                                                B.  F.  BUTLER. Major General Thomas S.  Jesup, 
            Volusia,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, January 4, 1837.

    Sir:  Your  letter  of  the  5th  ultimo,  announcing  your  arrival  at  Volusia,  and  your  receipt  of  a  copy  of  the  instructions  of  this  Department  of  the  4th  November  last,  was  not  received  until  the  30th  ultimo.  I  had, however,  previously  received  your  letters  of  the  9th  and  12th  ultimo,  and  by  them  had  been  informed  of  your  arrival  at  Volusia,  and  your  assumption of  the  command  of  the  army.  

    As  an  act  of  justice  to  Governor  Call,  as  well  as  to  yourself,  I  have  caused several  extracts  from  those  parts  of  your  letters  in  which  you  speak  of  the  great  difficulties  encountered  by  him,  and  of  those  with  which  you  are  obliged  to  contend,  to  be  inserted  in  the  Globe  newspaper.

    I  have  also  the  honor,  on  the  present  occasion,  to  acknowledge  the  re­ceipt  of  your  letters  of  October  23d  and  November  6th;  the  first  received  on  the  11th  and  the  last  on  the  29th  of  November.

    The  instructions  of  this  Department  of  the  4th  November,  and  the  measures  subsequently  taken,  and  of  which the  Adjutant  General  has  kept  you  advised,  will  probably  have  met,  so  far  as  was  necessary,  the  various  points  embraced  in  these,  and  in  your  subsequent  communications.

    The  instructions  of  the  4th  of  November  were  prepared  on  the  supposition  that  they  might  roach  yon,  and that  you  might  assume  the  command  before  the  resumption  of  the  campaign,  and  whilst  the  enemy  might  be yet  intrenched  in  the  cove  of  the  Withlacoochee.  In  that  state  of  things,  it  was  believed  that  the  establishment  of  posts  at  Fort  King  and  Volusia,  as  well  as  at  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee,  would  be  found  in­dispensable  to  operations  on  that  river  ;  but  it  was  not  intended  to  make  the  order,  in  respect  to  those  posts,  a positive  one,  nor  to  require  their  continu­ance  after  they  should  cease  to  be  required  by  the  necessities  of  the  service.  You  will  therefore,  hereafter,  exercise  your  own  judgment  in  relation  to  these  and  to  other  posts;  and,  whilst  you  will  adhere,  in  general,  to  the  plan  of  operations  indicated  in  the  letter  of  the  4th  November,  you  will  consider  yourself  at  liberty  to  adopt  such  measures,  and  to  pursue  such  course  in  the  execution  of  them,  as  the  means  at  your  disposal  may  allow,  and  as  you  may  deem  most likely  to  accomplish  the  objects  of  the  campaign.

                                                                                                B.  F.  BUTLER. 
Major General Thomas S.  Jesup.  
            Volusia,  Florida.

__________

                                                WAR DEPARTMENT, February 11, 1837.

    Sir  :  I  had  the  honor  on  the  8th  instant  to  receive  your  letters  of  the  19th  and  21st  ultimo.  Those  of  the  23d  of  December were  received on the  16th  ultimo,  and  published  for  the  information  of  Congress  and  the  nation.  This  has  also  been  done  with  several  letters,  or  parts  of letters,  since  received;  and,  with  proper  limitations,  this  course  seemed  necessary  to  meet  the  public  solicitude.

    Your  determination,  in  respect  to  those  companies  of  the  6th  infantry  which  have  arrived  in  Florida,  is  entirely  approved;  and  you  will  retain  them  and  any  others  of  the  same  regiment  who  may  reach  Florida,  so long  as  you  shall  desire  their  services  in  that  quarter.

    The  cutting  off  and  capturing  of  so  many  small  parties  of  the  Indians  and  negroes  must  have  the  effect  immediately  to  weaken,  and  ultimately  to  subdue  them;  and,  in  that  view,  your  recent  operations  are  regarded as  highly  important.

                                                                                                B.  F.  BUTLER.
Major General Thomas S. Jesup, 
            Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________


                                                WAR DEPARTMENT,  February  22,  1837.

    Sir  :  Your  letter  of  the  7th  instant,  announcing  the  success  of  your  expedition  to  the  head  of  the  Coloosahatchie,  was  this  day  received;  and  I  hasten  to  express  to  you  the  gratification  which  its  contents  have  given  to  the  President  and  the  Department.

    I  had  the  honor,  in  my  letter  of  the  11th  instant,  to  give  the  assent  of  the  Department  to  your  retaining those  companies  of  the  6th  infantry  which  have  reached,  or  may  reach,  Florida,  so  long  as  you  may  desire•  them;  and  I  believe  the  Adjutant  General  had  made  the  like  communica­tion  a  day  or  two  before.

                                                                                                B.  F.  BUTLER,  
                                                                                    Secretary  of  War  ad  interim.

Major General Thomas S. Jesup, 
            Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, March 11, 1837.

    Sir  :  Your  several  letters  of  the  17th,  20th,  and  22d  ultimo,  were  received  on  the  9th  instant.

    Should  the  arrangements  in  progress  with  the  hostile  Seminoles  fail  of  being  carried  into  effect,  the  attention  of  the  Department  will,  of  course,  be  given  promptly  to  the  measures  which  shall  then  be  necessary,  and  which  you  may  suggest,  for  the  further  prosecution  of  the  war.

    On  Monday  next  I  shall  retire  from  the  temporary  care  of  the  Depart­ment;  but,  before  my  connexion  with  it  terminates,  I  desire  to  make  known  to  you  the  high  sense  entertained  by  the  late  President  and  myself  of  the indefatigable  zeal  and  the  great  promptitude  and  skill  with  which  you  have  devoted  yourself  to  the  arduous duties  of  your  command.  Having,  as  one  of  my  first  official  acts,  directed  you  to  assume  that  responsibility,  and  having  since,  from  time  to  time,  given  much  of  my  attention  to  your  movements,  and  repeatedly  conferred  with  the  Execu­tive  thereon,  I  feel  it  my  duty  to  place  this  testimonial  on  the  records  of  the  Department.

    I  take  pleasure  in  communicating,  with  it,  my  best  wishes  for  your  success  as  a  commander,  and  for  your personal  happiness  and  renown.

                                                                                                B.  F.  BUTLER, 
                                                                                    Secretary of War ad interim 
Maj.  Gen.  Thomas S. Jesup, 
            Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, March 20, 1837.

    Sir  :  It  is  of  great  importance  that  this  Department  should  have  as  accurate  a  knowledge  as  possible  of  the  topography  of  Florida,  and  par­ticularly  of  the  seat  of  war  in  that  Territory  ;  and  I  have  therefore  to  request that  you  will  furnish  me,  at  as  early  a  day  as  your  other  impor­tant  duties  will  permit,  all  the  information  on  this  subject  in  your  posses­sion,  and  which  you  can  conveniently  obtain.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT,
                                                                                                Secretary of War
Maj.  Gen.  Thomas S. Jesup,  
            Fort  Dade,  Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, March 20, 1837.

    Sir:  Your  letter  of  the  25th  of  February  has  been  received,  and  I  am  gratified  to  learn  that  you  entertain hopes  of  soon  terminating,  by  negoti­ation,  this  protracted  and  distressing  war.  I  am  glad,  however,  to  find  that  you  have  not  relaxed  your  exertions  to  prepare  for  a  renewal  of  hos­tilities,  provided  negotiations  should  unfortunately  fail.  If  you  have  to  move  your  forces  once  more  against  the  Indians,  I  should  recommend  that  you  take  early  measures  to  select  positions  where  the  troops  may  be  posted  during  the  rainy  and  summer  months.  In  this  selection,  you  will  have  due  regard  to  the  health  of  the  posts,  the  facility  of  receiving  regular  supplies,  and  the  means  of  restraining  the  Indians  within  the  limits  to  which  they  have  been  driven.  If hostilities are  renewed,  I  have  no  doubt  you  will  use  every  exertion  to  bring  the  war  to  a  successful  termination:  but  prudence  dictates  that  every  measure  of  prevention  should  be  taken  to  place  the  troops  in  advantageous  and  healthy  situations  for  the  summer,  in  the  event  of  the  war  being  prolonged  beyond  that  period.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT. 
Maj.  Gen.  Thomas S. Jesup,  
            Fort  Dade,  Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, March 27, 1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  had  the  honor  to  receive  your  letter  of  the  7th  instant,  respecting  the  further  continuance  of  the  regiment  of  Creek  warriors  in  the  service  of  the  United  States.  The  reasons  given  by  you  for  adopting  this  measure  are  entirely  satisfactory,  and  the  Department  therefore  approves  it,  and  will  carry  into  effect  the  assurances  which  you  have  given  those  Indians  respecting  their  subsistence  after  their  arrival  at  their  new homes  in  the  West.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT. 
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Fort  Dade,  Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, May 6, 1837.

    Sir  :  I  had  the  honor  to  receive  your  letter  of  the  9th  of  April,  conveying  the  pleasing  intelligence  that  the war  in  Florida  is  over,  unless  renewed  by  the  imprudence  and  violence  of  the  white  inhabitants  of  that Territory.  From  such  a  danger  it  is  believed  that  your  prudence  and  firmness  will  preserve  the  country.

    Your  distribution  of  the  forces  which  are  judged  necessary  to  be  re­tained  in  Florida  for  the  purpose  of protecting  the  frontier  inhabitants,  and  your  intention  to  withdraw  others  from  posts  deemed  unhealthy early  in the  month  of  June,  are  approved.  ·

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT.
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup, 
            Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, May 17, 1837.

    Sir:  Paymaster  Andrews  has  reported  himself  at  this  Department,  and  given  important  information  concerning  the  state  of  the  troops  in  Florida.  From  the  severe  duty  which  has  been  imposed  on  the  troops  in  Florida,  and  their  sufferings  under  circumstances  of  peculiar  privation,  in  a  climate  little  congenial  to  the  health  of  most  of  them,  I  feel  much  concerned  in  their  behalf,  with  a  disposition  to  afford  them  every  relief  consistent  with a  just  regard  to  the  service;  as  I  feel  assured  that  every  portion  of  the  army  serving  in  that  quarter  has  done  its duty  most  faithfully,  and  is  de­serving  of  the  kindest  treatment.

    Instead,  therefore,  of  ordering  the  regiments  of  artillery  to  the  Sabine,  as  directed,  you  will,  as  soon  as circumstances  will  permit,  allow  the  1st,  2d,  and  4th  regiments  to  repair  to  the  posts  assigned  them  in  general  or­der  No.  58  of  last  year;  where,  it  is  hoped,  they  will  find  repose  and  be  able  to  recruit  their  strength.  The  3d  regiment  of  artillery,  which  is  des­tined  to  garrison  the  posts  from  Savannah  to  the  Mississippi,  you  will  order  to  Fort  Mitchell,  it  being  a  healthy  place;  or,  should  the  whole  of  the  regiment  not  be  required  for  duty at  that  place,  during  the  unhealthy  season  it  may  be  distributed  among  the  healthy  stations  assigned  it  in general  order  No.  58,  to  wit:  St.  Augustine  and  Forts  Pickens  and  Morgan.

    In  communicating  to  you  this  mode  of  relief  to  the  troops,  it  is  not  in­tended  to  interfere  with  any  arrangements  you  may  have  made,  or  may·  think  of  making,  for  the  security  of  the  country or  the  property  belonging  to  the  Government  ;  but  it  is  intended  to  convey  to  you  an  expression  of  my  satisfaction  with  the  conduct  of  the  troops,  and  to  evince  to  them, through  you,  the  disposition  which  the  Department  feels  to relieve  them  as  early  as  possible  from  the  hardships and  sufferings  which  they  have  so  nobly  sustained  in  the prosecution  of  the  war  against  the  Seminoles.

    With  a  view  of  alleviating,  as  far  as  in  my  power,  the  burdens  im­posed  on  commandants  of  posts  in :Florida,  I  have  directed  that  double  rations  be  allowed  to  the  commanding  officers  of  Fort  Harlee,  Fort  Crane, Fort  Clinch,  Fort  King,  Fort  Armstrong,  Fort  Dade,  Fort  Foster,  Fort  Hillsboro,  Fort  Volusia,  and  Fort  Mellon  : this  allowance  to  take  effect  from  the  time  those  posts  were  established,  and  to  be  continued  until  their evacuation.  The  other  posts  have  been  provided  for  by  the  order  of  the 21st  of  June  last.

    In  sending  the  troops  to  their  stations,  as  herein  indicated,  a  due  regard should  be  had  to  their  present  positions,  in  order  to  relieve  them  as  much  as  possible  from  marching  through  an  unhealthy  country  at  this  season  of the  year.  

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT. 
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,  
Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

    P.  S.  I  have  to  request  that  the  brigade  of  militia  under  General  Hernandez,  and  such  of  the  volunteers  in the  Territory  of  Florida  as  are  not,  in  your  opinion,  necessary  to  ensure  the  peace  and  safety  of  the  Territory,  be  forthwith  discharged.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, May 17, 1837,

    Sir  :  I  have  to  request  that  you  will  instruct  the  officers  of  the  subsist­ence  department  :in  Florida  to continue,  till  the  1st  of  October  next,  the  issue  of  rations  to  such  of  the  suffering  inhabitants  of  that  Territory as  may,  in  their  opinion,  and  in  that  of  the  commanding  officers  of  the  dif­ferent  posts,  be  fit  objects  of  the bounty  of  the  Government.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,  
Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

_________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, May 25, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  8th  instant,  with  its  enclosures.

    I  concur  entirely  in  the  opinion  you  have  expressed,  that  the  claim  presented  by  Mr.  Gould,  as  the  attorney of  Josiah  Dupont’s  heirs,  is  embraced  by  the  provisions  of  the  sixth  article  of  the  treaty  with  the  Seminoles  of  May  9,  1832,  The  parties  must  be  aware  of  this,  as  it  appears  from  a  report  received  from  General  Thompson,  in  1835,  that  they  presented  to  him  evidence  in  support  of  it,  which  he  transmitted  to  this  Department.  This  report  will  be  soon  acted  upon  ;  and  when  the  Department  is  in  possession  of  all  the  claims,  and  necessary information,  the  sum  stipulated to  be  paid  will  be  paid  in  such  manner  as  the  aggregate  amount  of  them  may  render  necessary.

    You  can  communicate  these  views  to  the  persons  interested,  with  an  assurance  that  no  measure  taken  now,  in  relation  to  their  slaves  or  negroes,  will  affect  injuriously  any  just  claim  against  the  Seminoles.  But,  at  the same  time,  the  Government  cannot  permit  a  discussion  of  individual  rights  to  interfere  with  a  prompt  and  peaceable  removal  of  these  Indians.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.
Major Gen. Thomas S. Jesup
            Tampa Bay, Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, May 25, 1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  received  your  letter  of  the  8th  instant,  and  have  read  with  interest  the  copy  of  Colonel  Harney’s despatch  enclosed  by  you.

    In  order  that  the  present  gratifying  prospect  of  a  speedy  termination  of  the  difficulties  in  Florida  may  not  be  marred,  the  Department  advises  that  you  continue  to  exercise  great  vigilance  in  protecting  the  Indians  from  all violence,  both  from  the  troops  and  the  citizens;  and  that  you  take  all  proper  measures  to  prevent  any  officious  interference  from  any  quarter  with  your  operations.

    The  attacks  upon  your  course  of  conduct,  to  which  you  allude,  arc  not  worthy  of  your  notice  ;  and  it  is  hoped  that  you  will  steadily  proceed  in  the  execution  of  your  important  duties,  without  regard  to  them,  and  rely  upon  the  support  of  the  people,  and  the  approbation  of  the  Department,  to  sustain  you  in  your  efforts  to  put an  end  to  the  war,  and  to  send  the  Indians  speedily  and  peaceably  to  their  new  homes.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.
Major Gen. Thomas S. Jesup
            Tampa Bay, Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, July 25, 1837.

    Sir  :  As  you  have  in  several  of  your  letter  expressed  an  opinion  of  the  impossibility  of  removing  the  Seminoles,  and  a  doubt  of  the  policy  and  propriety  of  persevering  in  that  measure,  it  becomes  necessary  to  explain  to  you  the  views  of  the  Executive  on  that  subject.  It is true that the  Seminoles  dwell  in  an  inhospitable  and  deadly  climate,  and  occupy  inac­cessible  swamps  and  morasses,  which  are  not  susceptible  of  cultivation  or  improvement  by  the  whites.  Still,  their  further  continuance  there  was  found  to  be  incompatible  with  the  peace  and  security  of  the  citizens  of  the  United  States  who  inhabit  Florida,  as  well  as  with  their  own  preservation  and  independence  ;  it  became,  therefore,  the  duty  of  the  Government  to  carry  out  the  same  policy  with  regard  to  the  Seminoles,  which  it  had  adopted  in  its  treatment  of  the  other  Indian  tribes  east  of  the  Mississippi – remove  them  to  the  abundant  and  fertile  country  beyond  that  river;  or  to  withdraw  the  settlers  from  East  Florida,  and  protect  the  western  part  of  that  Terri­tory by s  cordon  of  posts  and  troops.  Every  consideration  of  sound  policy  required  them  to  adopt  the  former  alternative  ;  and,  in  pursuance  of  this decision,  the  treaty  of Payne’s  Landing  was  concluded.  Three  years  were  allowed  the  Indians  to  prepare  for  their  removal  ;  and  this term  was  fur­ther  extended,  and  every  indulgence  that  they  asked  promptly  and  kindly  granted,  until  it  was  made  manifest  that  they  did  not  intend  to  fulfil  their  treaty  obligations,  and  it became  the  imperative  duty  of  the  Executive  to  compel  them  to  do  so.  As  soon  as  this  determination  of  the  Government  was  made  known  to  them,  they  broke  out  into  open  hostility  ;  and,  taking  advantage  of  the  unprotected  state  of  the  frontier,  carried  fire  and  sword  into  the  white  settlements,  committing  the  most  horrible  cruelties  and  ex­cesses.  It  is  true  that  in  the  contest  which  ensued  they  have  displayed,  in  an  eminent  degree,  the  savage  virtues  of  constancy  and  courage  ;  and  that,  aided  by  the  climate,  and  the  nature  of  the  country,  they  have  so  far  successfully  defended themselves  against  superior  forces,  directed  by  brave  and  skilful  officers;  but  the  conduct  and  courage  of  the  enemy  do  not  alter  the  nature  of  the  war,  nor  diminish  our  obligation  to  subdue  them,  and  to  compel  them  to  fulfil  their  engagements.  ‘To  abandon  the  settled  policy  of  the  Government  because  the  Seminoles  have  proved  themselves  to  be  good  warriors,  and  rely  for  the  protection  of  our  frontiers  upon  the  faith  of  treaties  with  a  people  who  have  given  such  repeated  proofs  of  treachery,  would  be  unwise  and  impolitic.  We  cannot  desist from  prosecuting  this  war  until  the  Seminoles  consent  to  remove  from  Florida,  without  an  abandonment  of  the  only  measures  which  can  pre­serve  the  independence,  and  even  existence,  of  the  Indian  tribes,  and  in­viting  the  resistance  of  all  those  who  now  remain  east  of  the  Mississippi,  To  withdraw  our  forces  now,  would  betray  great  weakness,  and  not  only  tarnish  the  honor  of  our  arms,  but  violate  the  sacred  obligations  of  the  Government  of  the  United  States  to  protect  the  persons  and  property  of  the  citizens  of  Florida  from  the  savage  aggressions  of  the  Indians.  I  am  persuaded  that  this  obligation  can  be  fulfilled  without  seeking  to  extermi­nate  the  Seminoles,  and  am  gratified  to  find,  that,  after  having  had  time  for  further  examination  and  reflection,  you  coincide  in  this  opinion.  In  consequence  of  the  earnest  desire  expressed  in  your  letter  to  the  Adjutant  General,  of  the  5th  of  June  last,  to  be  relieved  from  the  command  of  the  army  of  Florida,  this  Department  assented  to  your  wishes  ;  and  you  were  informed  that  yon  might  withdraw  from  the  army,  and  return  to  your  appropriate  duties  at  Washington,  provided,  on  the  receipt  of  that  permis­sion,  you  still  desired  to  do  so.  The,  uncertainty  of  your  retaining  the  command,  rendered  it  unnecessary  to  correspond  with  you  on  the  subject  of  the  preparations  for  the  next  campaign;  but  finding,  from  your  letter  of  the  8th  of  July,  to  the  Commanding  General  of  the  army  of  the  United  States,  that  you  are  now  desirous  to  remain  and  conduct  the  next  cam­paign,  which  you  believe  may  be  done  in  a  manner  to  ensure  success,  I  will  enter  into  the  subject  fully,  and  inform  you  of  the  measures  which  have  been  taken  here  already,  and  of  those  which it  is  deemed  advisable  to  adopt, as  well  in  the  prosecution  of  the  preparations  for  opening  the  campaign,  as  for  the  conduct  of  the  war.  In  giving  the  views  of  the  De­partment  on  this  subject,  it  is  not  meant  to  confine  your  operations  in  the  field,  but merely  to  po.int  out  the  general  principles  on  which  those  ought  to  be  conducted,  leaving  all  the  details  to  your  own  sound  discretion;  which,  aided  by  the  knowledge  you  have  lately  acquired  of  the  country,  will  lead,  no  doubt,  to  the  realization  of  your  hopes,  and  the  successful termination of this disastrous war.

    The  recruiting  service  has  been  very  successful,  and  the  regiments  serv­ing  and  to  serve  in  Florida  will  have  their  full  complement;  and  it  is  intended  to  ask  authority  from  Congress,  in  September,  to  increase  the  companies  to  one  hundred  men  ;  so  that  there  will  be  sufficient  time  to  carry  out  that  measure  before  the  period  arrives  for  opening  the  campaign.  With  the  present  establishment,  by  sending  the  whole  of  the  first infantry,  four  companies  of  the  second  infantry,  three  companies  of  the  second  re­giment  of  dragoons,  and  a  sufficient  number  of  recruits  to  fill  the  companies to  their  establishment,  there  will  then  be  thirty-six  companies  of  artillery of  fifty  each,  making  one  thousand  eight  hundred;  thirty-two  companies of  infantry  of  fifty  each,  one  thousand  six  hundred  ;  and  ten  companies  of  dragoons  of  seventy  each,  seven  hundred  ;  making  in  all  four thousand  one  hundred  men,  which  will  be  in  Florida  by  October  next  :  and  if  the  contemplated  measure  of  augmenting  the  army  meets  with  the  approba­tion  of  Congress,  the  companies  can  be  increased,  and  the  army  of  Flor­ida  carried  up  to  seven  thousand  five  hundred  men.  Measures  have  been  taken  to  obtain  the  Indian  force  you  have  recommended,  and  it  is  hoped  that  one  thousand  warriors  will  be  at  Tampa  in  time  to  co-operate  with  the  regulars  at  the  commencement  of  the  campaign:  say  two  hundred  Delawares,  four  hundred Shawnees,  one  hundred  Sacs  and  Foxes,  one  hundred  Kickapoos,  and  two  hundred  Choctaws;  making,  in  all,  one  thou­sand  warriors.  With  respect  to  the  militia,  it  would  appear  preferable  to  have  them  brought  into  the  field  from  different  sections  of  the  country,  in  companies,  and  not  to  organize  them  into  separate  regiments,  but  attach  them  as  light  infantry  companies  to  those  already  organized.  The  staff of  the  militia  is  exceedingly expensive  and  cumbrous,  and  might  very  well  be  dispensed  with.  It  is  thought  totally  inexpedient  to  employ  mounted  militia  on  this  service.  Experience  has  proved  that  description of  force  to  be  more  expensive  than  efficient,  and  I  will  place  under  your  command  as  many  companies  of  the  2d  regiment  of  cavalry  as  you  may deem  requisite.

    Your  suggestion  with  regard  to  the  usefulness  of  spy  companies  meets  the  approbation  of  the  Department,  and  has  been  already  acted  upon.  Measures  have  been  taken  to  engage  the  class  of  people  designated,  and,  on  your  part,  you  may  adopt  such  as  you  think  proper  to  increase  this  description  of  force.

    Measures  are  being  adopted  for  establishing  rapid  and  certain  commu­nications  between  this  Department  and  the  seat  of  war.  A  line  of  steam.  packets  is  already  in  successful  operation  between  Washington  and  Charleston,  leaving  this  place  on  Friday  and  reaching  Charleston  on  the  following  Monday;  when  a  sea  steamer  may  be  despatched  to  the  St.  John’s,  and  return  in  time  for  the  departure  of  the  packet  on  the  following Friday.  This  vessel  reaches  Washington  again  on  Monday,  so  that  ten  days  will  suffice  to  communicate  with  the  forces  under  your  command.  It  is  proposed  to  make  Jacksonville  the  principal  depot  for  the  operations  on  the  eastern  side  of  the  peninsula;  and  you  will  give  immediate  orders  for  the  erection  of  sufficient  storehouses  for  that  purpose,  sending  a  com­petent  officer  to  make  a  judicious  selection  of  the  site,  which  ought,  if  possible,  to  be  on  the  river  bank,  so  as  to  avoid  the  expense  and  delay  of  land  transportation.  From  this  point,  forage,  provisions,  and  all  things  required  for  the  use  of  the  army,  can  be  conveyed  by  steamers  to  any place on the St. John’s where they may be wanted, to the nearest and most  commodious  point  whence  to  commence  land-carriage.  In  order  to  ensure  the  success  of  these  operations,  it  will  be  necessary  to  engage  the  re­quisite  number  of  steamboats  for  this  service;  and  the  Department  desires  to  be  folly  informed  on  that  subject,  in  order  that  it may  decide  whether  to  continue  the  contract  or  to  purchase  boats.  And  here  it  may  be  well  to  remark,  that  sea  vessels  ought  to  be  employed  for  transportation  between  New  Orleans  and  Tampa,  and  between  the  Eastern  ports  and  Jackson­ville,  and  the  use  of  steamers  confined  to  the  rivers.  It  will  be  well  to  have  on  the  eastern  and  western·  rivers,  in  addition  to  the  barges  which  you  already  have,  a  number  of  flat-bottomed  boats  to  push  up  the  shallow  streams,  and  to  serve  for  lighters  in  the  event  of  the  steamers  grounding.

    Whatever  land  transportation  you  may  require  will  be  furnished  by  the  proper  department.  Light two-horse wagons, drawn by mules, are the best.  And  here  let  me  advise  you  not  to  burden  yourself  with  too  many  horses,  either  for  cavalry  or  transportation;  it  is  extremely  difficult  to  subsist  them  in  the  country  you  are  to  operate  in,  and,  when  too  numerous,  instead  of  facilitating,  they  retard  the  movements  of  an  army.  I  observe  in  the  plan  of  campaign  submitted  to  the  Department,  in  your  letter  of  15th  of  June,  you  call  for  nine  hundred  and  fifty  calvary :  this  appears  to  be  too  great  a number  to  subsist  in  Florida,  but,  if  they  are  deemed  essentially  necessary,  they  shall  be  furnished  of  regulars.  The  immense  loss  of  horses  by  the  militia,  and  the  enormous  expense  incurred  by  the  employment  of  that  description  of  troops,  have  determined  the  Department  rather  to bring  into  the  field  the  whole  disposable.  force  of  regular  calvary,  than  to  make  any  draughts  for  mounted volunteers.

    In  the  entire  absence  of  topographical  knowledge  of  the  country  which  is  the  theatre  of  your  operations,  I cannot  give  an  opinion  of  the  plan  of  campaign  you  propose  to  follow.  It  has  appeared  to  me  that,  hitherto,  the  base  of  your  operations  has  been  confined  too  much  to  a  line  parallel  to  the  coast,  and  that,  if  the  nature of  the  country  would  permit,  it  might  be  better  to  establish  it  across  the  peninsula;  but  of  this  I  will  defer  a  positive  opinion  until  I  receive  copies  of  the  results  of  the  several  recon­noissances  you  have  caused  lately  to be  made.  I  beg  that  you  will  com­municate  frequently  with  the  Department,  and  as  much  as  possible  in  detail,  so  that  there  may  be  no  defect  nor  tardiness  in  sending  forward  the  supplies  you  may  require,  or  otherwise  co-operating  with  you  in  making  the  necessary  arrangements  and  preparations  for  a  vigorous  prosecution  of  the campaign,  as  soon  as  the  season  will  permit  it  to  be  commenced  without  risk  to  the  troops.

    The  period  ought  to  be  determined  by  experience  of  the  climate.  In  all  our  Southern  countries  with  which  I  am  acquainted,  the  fall  of  the  year  is  the  most  sickly;  and  to  commence  active  operations  in  the  lower  parts of  Carolina  or  Georgia  before  the  lst  November,  unless  there  should  be  a  frost  earlier  in  the  season,  would  be  attended  with  certain  disease,  and  occasion  the  destruction  of  one-half  of  the  army.  If  the  troops  are  assem­bled  in  October,  it  appears  to  me  tune  enough;  but  I  will  be  glad  to  hear  further  from  you  on  that  subject.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT. 
To Major General Thomas S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding  in  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, August 1, 1837.

    Sir:  I  enclose  for  your  information  copies  of  instructions  that  have  been  issued,  in  reference  to  the  employment  of  an  Indian  force  during  the  next  campaign  in  Florida.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT. 
To  Maj.  Gen.  Thomas  S.  Jesup, 
            Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, August 3, 1837.

    Sir:  The  attention  of  the  Department  has  been  called  to  the  subject  of  the  aid  afforded  by  Government  to  suffering  inhabitants  of  Florida,  by  a  late  letter  received  by  the  Quartermaster  General  from  Lieutenant  Vinton, informing  him  that  another  steamboat  has  been  employed  to  transport  subsistence,  on  the  requisition  of  Governor  Call,  who  alleges  that  the  one  now  on  that  service  (the  Izard)  is  not  sufficient  to  supply  the  suffering  inhabitants  assembled  at  St.  Mark’s,  Yon  were  informed,  by  a  letter  of  May  the  17th,  that  the President  had  resolved  to  continue  the  distribution  of  rations  to  the  inhabitants  who  were  unable  to  maintain  themselves  until  the  1st  of  October  next,  and  by  that  intimation  it  was  intended  to  convey  his  intention  that these  supplies  should  cease  at  that  time.  The object  of  Congress  would  appear  to  have  been  to  succor  the immediate wants  of  a  people  who  had  been  suddenly  driven  from  their  homes  and  deprived  of  the  means  of  supporting  themselves;  not  to  continue  during  the  whole  war  to  maintain  them  gratuitously,  thereby  withdrawing  all  motive  for  exertion  on  the  part  of  those  who  might  otherwise  find  means  to  maintain  themselves.  Cases  may  present  themselves  of  the  aged  and  infirm,  the  widow  and  the  orphan,  wherein  yon  may  be  called  upon  to  exercise  a  sound  discretion,  as  you  are  hereby  authorized  to  do;  but,  on  the  1st  of  October,  the  present  system  of  dealing  out  rations  to  the  suffer­ing  inhabitants  of  Florida  generally,  as  now  practised,  must  cease;  and  as  early  notice  as  possible  ought  to  be  given  of  this  determination  of  the  President.

    That  none  may  suffer  under  this  decision,  you  will  give  employment  to  those  who  are  in  want  of  it;  and  it is  supposed  that  the  various  branches of  the  service,  especially  the  establishment  of  stores,  posts,  and  good  com­munications  throughout  the  country,  will  enable  you  to  do  so.  Apart  from  the  pernicious  moral  influence  of  an  indefinite  continuance  of  such  a  system,  the  success  of  the  campaign  will  be  jeoparded  by  it.  If  the  steamboats and  wagon-train,  and  other  transportation  intended  for  the  service  of  the  army,  may  be  called  off  at  any  time  from  their  legitimate  and  necessary  uses,  to  convey  these  supplies,  the  Commanding  General  cannot  be  certain  of  receiving  with  punctuality  and  despatch  those  in­tended  for  the  troops.  And  if  the  subsistence  destined  for  the  army  is  to  be  consumed  irregularly  by  the  requisitions  from  officers  whose  duty  it  has  been  to  obtain  the  rations  heretofore  distributed  to  the  inhabitants,  the  commissary’s  department  cannot  answer  for  the  result.  The supply  must,  either  way,  far  exceed  the  regular  demand,  which  is  attended,  as  experi­ence  proves,  with  great  waste  of  the  public stores; or there may be a deficiency  of  supplies  for  the  troops,  to  the  utter  destruction  of  the  best  com­bined  operations.  Even  those  rations  which,  in  the  use  of  a  sound  dis­cretion,  you  may  find  it  absolutely  necessary  to  distribute,  ought  to  be  taken  from  other  resources  than  those  intended  for  the  use  of  the  army,  and  transported  by  other  means  than  those  at  the  disposition  of  the  Quar­termaster’s  department  for  the  transportation  of  the  baggage  and  stores  of  the  army.

    Yoo  will  therefore  cause  all  such  persons  to  be  assembled  in  the  neigh­borhood  of  Jacksonville,  on  the  St. John’s,  and  at  Tampa  Bay,  or  Char­lotte  harbor-points  which  can  be  approached  by  sailing  vessels;  and  on  information  being  received  here  of  the  number  so  to  be  supplied,  measures  will  be  taken,  before  the  commencement  of  active  operations,  to  detach  this  service  from  the  army  altogether,  and  employ  agents  to  attend  to  it.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT. 
To  Major  General  Thomas S. Jesup,  
            Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, August 3, 1837.

    Sir:  It  appears  to  me  advisable  to  establish  a  post  in  Charlotte’s  har­bor,  on  some  convenient  and  healthy  site,  as  soon  as  the  means  in  your  power  will  permit  it  to  be  done;  and  from  thence  to  push  reconnoitring  parties  up  the  rivers  which  fall  into  that  bay,  in  order  to  obtain  a  knowl­edge  of  the  country  which  is  to  be  soon  the theatre  of  your  operations.  I  am  sorry  to  find  that  you  have  been  under  the  necessity  of  calling  out  so  many men  of  the  militia  of  Florida.  It  has  always  appeared  to  me  sound  policy  to  leave  as  many  of  the  Floridians as  possible  on  their  plant­ations,  and  not  to  compel  them  to  abandon  their  homes.  The  militia  had  better  be  drawn,  as  far  as  practicable,  from  the  neighboring  States,  and  the  people  of  the  country  left  to  guard  their  own hearths  and  protect  their  own  slaves.  I  have  no  doubt  the  exigency  of  the  case  required  yon  so  to  act,  but  I  am  desirous  you  should  know  the  views  of  the  Department  on  this  subject.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT.
To  Major  General  Thomas S. Jesup,  
            Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, August 16, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  to  request  that  you  will  observe  and  note  the  operation  of  the  existing  rules  and  regulations  of the  militia.  service  in  the  field,  with  a  view  to  their  future  revision.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT.
To  Major  General  Thomas S. Jesup,  
            Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARMENT, August 18, 1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  watched  the  progress  of  the  recruiting  service  with  great  anxiety;  and,  although  new  rendezvous have  been  opened,  and  I  believe  proper  exertions  used  by  the  officers  charged  with  this  department,  still  I  am  afraid  the  number  of  recruits  will  fall  short  of  the  complement  of  men  required  to  fill  up,  within  the  limited time,  the  regiments  destined  to  Florida.  Under  this  apprehension,  I  deem  it  expedient  that  yon  should  make  prompt  use  of  the  authority  heretofore  vested  in  yon,  to  call  for  such  militia  or  volunteer  force  as  you  may  think  necessary  to  complete  the  number  of  men  required  to  carry  out  the  plan  of  campaign  you  have  proposed;  the  latter  to  serve  six  or  twelve  months,  unless  sooner  discharged.  The  Adjutant  General  has  been  instructed  to  furnish  you  with  a  return  of  the  recruiting  service.  There  are  not  quite  a  thousand  men  at  Old  Point  Comfort,  and  the  return  from  all  the  recruiting  stations  will  not,  I  fear,  exceed  five  hun­dred  men  a  month.

    It  may  be  well  to  endeavor  to  re-enlist,  for  a  short  time,  the  men  now  in  Florida,  whose  term  of  service  is  about  to  expire  ;  say  to  the  end  of  the  campaign.  You  may  assure  them  of  the  punctual  fulfilment  of  any  arrange­ment  yon  may  find  it  beneficial  to  make  with  them,  on  the  part  of  the  Department,  within  its  legal powers.  .

  Every  exertion  is  being  made  by  the  Quartermaster  and  Commissary  Generals  to  complete  the  supplies necessary  to  the  success  of  your  opera­tions,  from  their  respective  departments.  A  return  of  them  will  be  fur­nished  to  you  ;  and  I  beg  you  will  advise  me  of  any  further  requirements  you  may  deem  essential  to  the health  and  comfort  of  the  troops,  and  to  the  efficiency  of  the  forces  under  your  command.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT  
Major  General  THOMAS  S.  Jesup,  
            Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida
.

__________

                                                WAR DEPARTMENT, August 25, 1837,  

    Sir  :  Your  letters  of  the  10th  and  14th  instant  have  been  received.

    In  accepting  the  services  of  the  brigade  of  volunteers  which  has  been  offered  for  service  in  Florida  from Kentucky,  which  you  are  hereby  au­thorized  to  do,  you  will  designate  the  description  of  force,  number  of  men and  officers  you  require,  and  the  organization  you  propose  to  give  it,  agreeably  to  that  adopted  by  the  late  President,  when  the  volunteers  for  the  last  campaign  were  mustered  into  service.

    In  communicating  to  you  my  own  convictions,  it  was  not  intended  to  do  any  thing  more  than  bring  them  to  your  notice – not  to  make  them  the  guide  of  your  conduct,  in  any  case  in  which  your  knowledge  and  experi­ence,  acquired  on  the  theatre  of  operations,  led  you  to  differ  from  them.  I  had  no  wish  to  break  up  the  depot at  Garey’s  Ferry,  and  ‘only  desired  to  have  established  the  general  depot  at  Jacksonville,  in  order  that  the  sup­plies  might  be  transported  by  sailing  vessels,  and,  being  discharged  there,  supplies  of  every  description  could  be  transported  there  by  steamers  to  Black  creek,  or  whatever  other  part  they  may  be  required.  Your impressions,  however,  appear  to  be  so  strong  as  to  the  inexpediency  of  making  the  depot  at  Jacksonville,  and  so  decidedly  in  favor  of  the  Pelatka,  that  yon  are  authorized  to  make  the  proposed  .alteration  in  the  orders  which  have  been  given  upon  this  subject;  or  if,  in  your  opinion,  sailing  vessels  can  be  brought  up  to  the  depot  at  Garey’s  Ferry,  by  being  towed  from  the  mouth  of  the  creek,  you  may  make  that  the  chief  depot  for  sup­plies  on  that  line  of  your  operations,  and  suppress  the  others.

    The  acting  Quartermaster  General  will  take  the  most  prompt  and  ac­tive  measures  to  send  all  the  articles  you require  from  his  department

    If  the  Engineer  department  can  furnish  the  dredge-boat,  and  sufficient  force  to  work  it,  in  time  to  deepen  the  bar,  and  remove  the  obstructions  to  navigation  at  the  head  of  the  lakes,  it  shall  be  done.  In  the  mean  time,  I  would  suggest,  that.  flat-bottomed  boats  be  used  as  lighters  for  the  steamers.  The  operation  of  unloading  and  loading  is,  I  acknowledge,  somewhat  tedious,  but  attended  with  less  labor  than  land-carriage.  Every  effort  is  making  to  obtain  for  the  army  under  your  command  the  description  of  force  you  require.  The  2d  regiment  of dragoons,  now  on  their  march  from  Jefferson  barracks,  it  is  hoped,  from  their  having  had  some  time  to  drill,  will  furnish  you  a  few  companies  of  good  cavalry;  and  rendezvous  have  been  opened  in  the  interior  districts,  with  the  hope  of  obtaining  men  acquainted  with  the  use  and  management  of  horses.

    If  the  plan  suggested  by  me  cannot  be  carried  out,  you  will  designate  the  description  of  force  you  require,  in  the  requisitions  upon  the  States;  not  merely  asking  for  regiments,  brigades,  or  companies,  but  stating  in  every  instance  the  number  of  men  and  officers  required,  and  mustering  none  other  into  service.  You  may  call  for  whatever  number  of  volun­teer  cavalry  you  require  ;  but  I  would  suggest  whether  it  would  not  be  advisable  to  bring  the  men  chiefly  by  water,  and  have  the  horses  driven  by  careful  persons,  so  that  they  may  be  fresh  on  their  arrival.  If  mounted  men march  from  Kentucky  or  Tennessee  on  horseback,  the  horses  will  be  galled and  used  up,  before  they  reach  the  Territory.

    The  map  was  very  acceptable,  and,  as  soon  as  the  one  you  intend  to  forward  from  Tampa  reaches  the  Department,  it  shall  be  lithographed,  and  copies  furnished  to  the  officers  in  service  in  Florida,  in  order  that  while  they  use  it,  they  may  fill  it  up  with  such  information  as  they  can  derive  from  actual  observation.  On  a  cursory  examination  of  it,  the  plan  of  campaign  you  propose  appears  judicious.

    The  Navy  Department  will  furnish  the  vessels  required  ;  and  I  have  asked  for  the  officers  you  designate  to  command  the  steamers.  One  word  as  to  the  season  to  commencing  active  operations.  The  first  of  October  is  too  soon.  I  have  no  objections  to  the  force  you  require  being  in  Flori­da  early  in  that  month,  that  yon  may  organize  it,  and,  if  you  desire,  place  the  columns  in  position  ;  but  October  is  too  soon  to  begin  active  operations  in  the  field,  without  exposing  the.  troops  to  the  deadly  effects  .of  the  autum­nal  diseases  prevalent  in  the  latitude  and  climate  of East  Florida,

    I  regard  the  risk  to  the  health  of  the  men  to  be  so  great  at  that  season,  putting  to  hazard  the  success  of  the campaign,  that  I  am  compelled  to  in­struct  you  not  to  commence  active  operations  of  attack  before  the  com­mencement  of  November.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT.
To  Major  General  Thomas S. Jesup, 
            Garey’s  Ferry,  Florida.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, August  26,  1837.

    Sir  :  I  enclose  you  a  letter  of  the  Commissioner  of  Indian  Affairs,  and  will  thank  you  to  furnish  him  with the  information  he  desires  respecting  the  Creek  warriors  in  Florida.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup.

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, August 30, 1837.

    Sir  :  Since  the  letter  from  this  Department  was  written,  asking  you  to  report  what  disposition  yon  intended to  make  of  the  Creek  warriors,  whose  families  are  at  Pass  Christian,  I  am  informed  by  the  Commissioner  of  In­dian  Affairs  that  it  is  desirable  they  should  be  sent  to  that  station  as  soon  as  can  conveniently  be  done,  in  order  that  they  may  be  ready  to  remove  early  in  the  month  of  October.  From  the  measures  taken  by  the  De­partment  to  supply  their  places,  it  is  hoped  that  you.  will  be  able  to  dis­pense  with  their  services  in  time  so  as not  to  interfere  with  the  measures  adopted  here  for  their  speedy  emigration.

    Your  letter  of  the  15th  instant  has  been  received,  and  your  wishes  with  regard  to  the  gnu-carriages  shall  be  complied  with  as  early  as  practicable.

    It  is  stated  by  some  persons  that  the  Shawnee,  Delaware,  and  Kicka­poo  tribe  of  Indians,  which  you  recommended  to  be  employed,  are  too  few  and  too  civilized  to  furnish  the  number  of  warriors  we  have  required  from  them.  Orders  were  given  to  the  officers,  in  the  event  of  their  not  succeeding  in  engaging  the number  of  Indians  required  from  these  tribes,  to  seek  them  elsewhere;  and  I  inform  yon  thus  early  of  all  the obstacle  likely  to  arise  that,  in  aid  of  the  Department,  you  may  take  such  measures  as  are  in  your  power  to obviate  them.

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT. 
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup
            Garey’s Ferry, Florida

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, September 2, 1837.

    Sir  :  Since  my  letter  to  you  of  the  25th  ultimo,  authorizing  you  to  ac­cept  a  brigade  of  volunteers  from  Kentucky,  I  have  been  informed  by  Gen­eral  Smith,  of  Louisiana,  that  the  same  number  of  efficient  men  can  be raised  in  that  State  without  delay.  These  being  accustomed  to  a  climate  similar  to  that  of  Florida,  and  so  near  the  scene  of  operations  that  they could  be  able  to  reach  there  at  a n  earlier  period  than  those  would  from  Kentucky,  I  have  determined  to  accept  the  services  of  the  former,  and  to countermand  the  authority  given  yon to  receive  the  latter.  

    The  Governor  of  Kentucky  will  be  this  day  informed  of  this  change  of  the  views  of  the  Department.  ·

                                                                                                J.  R.  POINSETT. 
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup
            Garey’s Ferry, Florida

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, September  6,  1837.

    Sir:  The  Department  having  made  arrangements  for  procuring  a  suf­ficient  volunteer  force  from  Tennessee,  with  that  which  will  be  raised  in  Louisiana  and  South  Carolina,  for  the  next  campaign  in  Florida,  it  will  be unnecessary  that  yon  should  call  upon  the  Governors  of  Georgia  and  Alabama  for  the  troops  you  were  authorized  to  request,  in  letters  from  this  Department,  some  time  since.  Nor  is  it  necessary  that  you  should  communicate  with  the  Governor  of  Tennessee  respecting  the  force  to  be  procured  in  that  State,  as  the  Department  will  take  the  necessary  meas­ures  respecting  it.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT. 
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup
            Garey’s Ferry, Florida

    P.  S.  The  number  of  volunteers  from  South  Carolina,  it  is  believed,  will  be  five  hundred.

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, September 6, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  com­municating  the  result  of  your  interview at  Fort  King  with  certain  sub-­chiefs  of  the  Seminoles,  and  hasten  to  say,  that  the  intelligence  given  by  you  is of  a  pleasing  character,  and  to  express  to  you  the  approbation  of  the  Department  of  the  course  you  have  pursued,  and  of  the  language  you  have  made  use  of  in  your  talk  with  the  Indians.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup
            Garey’s Ferry, Florida

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, September 9, 1837.

    Sir:  In  reply  to  that  part  of  your  letter  of  the  10th  ultimo,  which  refers  to  the  necessity  of  having  a  small  naval  force  to  aid  you  in  preventing  the  Indians  from  obtaining  powder  from  certain  points,  I  transmit  you  copies  of  letters  from  the  Secretary  of  the  Navy  and  the  Secretary  of  the  Treas­ury,  in  answer  to  requests  made to  them  by  this  Department  for  both  species  of  force.

    The  Secretary  of  the  Treasury  has  been  requested  to  place  the  cutters under  your  orders,  and  cause  them  to repair  to  Tampa  Bay  at  as  early  a  period  as  practicable.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup
            Garey’s Ferry, Florida

__________

                                                WAR DEPARTMENT, September 13, 1837.

    Sir:  I  have  had  the  pleasure  to  receive  your  letters  of  the  .28th  and  the  30th  August.

    In  reply  to  the  first,  relating  to  General  P.  F.  Smith,  of  Louisiana,  I  am  happy  to  inform  you  that  the  Department  has  anticipated  your  wishes, and  accepted  the services  of  that  officer  to  raise  a  regiment  in  Louisiana  for  the  service  of  the  Florida  war.  He  has  already  the  necessary  authority,  and  measures  are  in  operation  to  render  his  levies  effective.  You  can  communicate  to  him  the  point  where  you  desire  him  to  direct his  force.  As  you  indicate  Charlotte  harbor,  I  have  this  day  given  orders  to  send  the  battalion  of  2d  infantry,  (say  two  hundred  and  fifty  men.)  now  at  New  York,  to  that  post,  which  will  supply  the  place  of  the  marines. I  regret  that  force  has  not  been  retained  in  Florida,  but  suppose  it  is  too  late  so  to  direct  it.

    The  Department  is  satisfied  with  the  reasons  given  in  your  communi­cation  of  the  30th,  for  the  employment  of  the  Florida  militia.

   As  you  appear  to  apprehend  that  the  force  will  not  be  in  position  in  time  for  active  operations,  which  ought  not  to  commence  before  the  first  week  in  November,  I  recapitulate  what  has  been  ordered  on  the  subject.  Measures  have  been  taken  to  raise  six  hundred  volunteers  in  Tennessee,  six  hundred  in  Louisiana,  six  hundred in  Missouri,  with  three  hundred  additional  riflemen,  organized  as  spy  companies.  Active  officers  are  en­gaged  in  procuring  the  Indian  force  of  one  thousand  men.  These  troops,  we  confidently  expect,  will  be  in  Florida  in  the  month  of  October.  Five  hundred  regulars  will  take  their  departure  from  Old  Point  Comfort  for  Tampa,  from  the  20th  to  the  25th  of  this  month  ;  two  hundred  and  fifty  for  Charlotte  harbor  as  soon  as  practicable,  but  before  that  period;  and  from  the  1st  to  the  10th  of  October,  the  remaining  force  now  at  Fortress  Mon­roe,  (say  about  one  thousand  men.)  will  be  despatched  to  the  St.  John’s.

    The  steamer  New  Brighton  will  shortly  take  her  station  between  Charleston  and  Garey’s  Ferry,  and  our communications  will  then  be  regu­lar  and  frequent.  I  await  the  promised  map,  to  have  it  lithographed.

    I  send  the  instructions  prepared  for  the  commission  intended  to  be  sent  to  attend  to  the  subject  of distributing  rations  to  the  indigent  and  suffering  inhabitants  of  Florida.  As  some  days  may  elapse  before  the gentlemen  will  be  able  to  reach  Florida,  I  beg  you  will  cause  these  regulations  to  be  carried  out  immediately  after  the  1st  October,  by  the  officers  now  charged  with  that  duty.

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup
            Garey’s Ferry, Florida

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, October 4, 1837.

    Sir  :  The  Cherokee  chiefs  who  are  charged  with  this  communication,  having  expressed  a  desire  to  be  allowed  to  counsel  with  the  Seminoles,  in  order  to  save  that  people  from  the  consequences  of  the  impending war,  yon  will  permit  them  to  do  so.

    Very  respectfully,  your  most  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup

__________

                                                            WAR DEPARTMENT, October 4, 1837.

    Sir  :  It  having  been  signified  to  the  Department  that  certain  Cherokee  chiefs  have  expressed  a  desire  to counsel  the  Seminoles  to  submit  to  the  Government  of  the  United  States,  I  have  thought  it  advisable  to  permit them  to  do  so  ;  but  you  will  take  the  precaution  to  have  them  accompanied  by  such  agents  and  interpreters  as you  can  rely  upon,  in  order  to  en­sure  the  faithful  execution  of  their  proffered  services.

    Very  respectfully,  your  most  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    J.  R.  POINSETT.
To Major General Thomas S. Jesup
            St. Augustine, Florida

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,  
                                                                        Tampa Bay, November 3, 1836.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  enclose  a  return  of  the  troops  at  this  post. Not  having  returns  of  the  three  companies  of  regular  troops,  and  one  of  mounted  volunteers,  in  the  Creek  country  ;  of  the  two  companies  of  in­fantry  in  the  southern  counties  of  Georgia  ;  nor  of  the  battalion  of  mounted  Alabama  volunteers  on  their  way  to  join  me,  I  could  not  include  them  on the  return,

    Supplies  are  rapidly  corning  in;  and  if  I  had  the  means  of  transportation,  I  should  be  able  to  move  forward  the  moment  the  Alabama  volunteers  arrive.

    I  enclose,  for  the  information  of  the  General-in-chief  and  the  Secretary  of War,  a  copy  of  a  letter  to  his  excellency  Governor  Schley, dated  the  17th  ultimo;  and  a  copy  of  a  letter  to  his  excellency  Governor  Clay,  of  the  20th  ultimo,  on  the  subject  of  volunteers  for  12  months,  which  will  certainly  be  required  for  service  here,  as  there  seems  to  be  no  prospect  of  recruits  being  sent  to  fill  up  the  companies  in  this  Territory.  I  would  have  for­warded  copies  of  those  letters  sooner,  but  was  not  able  to  have  them made  out.

    I  also  enclose  a  letter  to  Commodore  Dallas.

    I  am,  sir,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                        TH.  S.  JESUP,  Major  General.
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________


                                    HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,  
                                                                        Tampa Bay, October· 19,  1836.

  Sir:  Previous  to  my  de1Jartnre  from  the  Creek  country,  that  excellent  officer,  Major  Nelson,  stationed  near  the  Cherokee  line,  proposed  to  raise  a  regiment  of  volunteers  for  twelve  months.  I  did  not  then  feel  author­ized  to accept  the  services  of  so  large  a  corps  ;  but  information  received  since  my  arrival  here  induces  the  belief  that the  war  in  this  country,  from  the  confidence  with  which  the  Indians  have  been  inspired  by  their  suc­cesses during  the  summer,  will  be  protracted,  and  that  the  services  of  the  regiment  offered  by  Major  Nelson  will  be  required.  I  must,  therefore,  request  your  excellency  to  give  the  necessary  orders  for  the  organization of  the  regiment,  and  its  march  to  Tallahassee.

    As  I  have  no  officer  disposable,  I  beg  you  to  appoint  an  officer  to  mus­ter  them  into  service.  Arms, ammunition,  camp-equipage,  &c.,  can  be  ob­tained  at  Columbus  or Fort  Mitchell.

    I  am  your  excellency’s  most  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                THOS. S. JESUP
                                                                                     Major General commanding
His  Excellency  WM,  SCHLEY,  
Governor  of  Georgia,  Milledgeville,  Ga.

                                                HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                     Steamboat  Merchant,  near  the  Withlacooehee,  October  20,  1836.

    DEAR  SIR  :  From  the  dispersed  condition  of  the  hostile  Indians  at  this  time  in  Florida,  the  war  will  be  tedious,  and  more  troops  will  be  required  than  are  now  in  the  field.  I  desire  that  the  fine  battalion  under  Lieuten­ant  Colonel  Cawlfield  should  be  extended  to  a  regiment.  I  beg  you  to  consider  this  letter  as  a  requisition  for  five  additional  companies  of  volun­teers  for  twelve  months.  Arms  and  every  necessary  equipment  can  be  had  at  Fort  Mitchell.  I  will  thank  you  to  organize  the  companies  into  a  battalion,  with  a  major  to  command  it,  and  let  the  colonel  be  elected  when  it  shall  have  joined  the  battalion  now  in  the  field.

    I  am,  dear  sir,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    ‘I’HOMAS  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                                                      Major  General.
His  Excellency  C.  C.  CLAY,  
Governor  of  Alabama,  Tuscaloosa,  Alabama.

__________

                        HEADQUARTERS, APPALACHICOLA, October 25, 1836.

    Sir  :  Pursuant  to  instructions  from  the  Secretary  of  War,  I  have  entered  Florida  with  the  disposable  force under  my  command  to  co-operate  with  his  excellency  Governor  Call,  in  the  prosecution  of  the  war  against  the Seminole  Indians.  To  strike  the  enemy  in  his  stronghold,  the  command  of  the  Withlacoochee  is  necessary;  to  take  and  retain  command  of  that  river,  small  steamboats  are  required.  The  Izard,  which  was  intended  for  that  service,  has  been  lost  on  the  bar  at  the  mouth  of  that  river  ;  and  our  operations  will  be  greatly  retarded,  if not  entirely  suspended,  if  she  be  not  replaced.

    Two  public  boats,  the  American  and  Dade,  have, I  understand,  been  sent  to  Pensacola  for  repairs.  If  they  could  be  made  fit  for  service,  and  one  of  them  be  sent  to  the  Withlacoochee,  and  the  other  to  the  Suwannee,  active  operations  might  be  commenced  in  a  few  days,  and  the  war  per­haps  brought  to  a  close,  before  the expiration  of  the  term  of  service  of  the  Tennessee  volunteers.  May  I  ask  the  favor  of  you  to  cause  them  to· be  repaired  at  the  navy  yard,  and  furnished  with  crews  from  your  command?

    The  efficient  co-operation  afforded  by  the  navy,  and  particularly  by  yourself,  in  the  Creek  campaign,  induces  me  to  make  this  request  ;  and  I  make  it  with  the  more  confidence,  from  the  belief  that,  with  your  enlarged and  liberal  views,  you  are  always  willing  to  promote  the  interest  of  the  whole  service  by  every  means  in  your  power.

    Colonel  Stanton,  quartermaster  and  adjutant  general  of  this  army,  whom  I  take  great  pleasure  in  introducing  to  your  acquaintance,  is  the  bearer  of  this  letter.  He  goes  to  Pensacola,  Mobile,  and  perhaps  to  New  Orleans,  on  public  duty.  I  have  requested  him  to  see  you  in  relation  to  the  steamboat  before  referred  to.

    With  high  consideration  and  respect,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                                    THOMAS  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                             Major  General  commanding.
Commodore  ALEXANDER  J.  DALLAS, 
            Comdg.  U.  S.  naval  force  on  the  Gulf  of  Mexico,  
                                                                        Pensacola, Florida.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                                                                        Tampa  Bay,  November  6,  1836.

    Sir : I  have  received,  this  evening,  your  letters  of  the  6th  and  8th  October.

    The marines and about five hundred regular troops are here.  A  detach­ment  of  Alabama  volunteers  arrived  to-day – about  a  hundred  and  twenty.  The  remainder  of  the  battalion,  about  a  hundred  and  eighty,  will  be  here  probably by  the  12th,  at  which  time  I  expect  mules  and  horses  from  New  Orleans  and  St.  Mark’s  for  packing.  On  my  arrival,  I  found  no  means  of  transportation,  or  I  should  ere  this  have  been  on  the  Withlacoochee,  The  moment  the  pack-horses  arrive,  I  shall  take  the  field.

    I  have  despatches  to-day  from  Governor  Call  and  General  Reed.  The  Governor,  with  the  Tennesseans  and  Floridians,  and  the  Indian  warriors,  will  move  on  the  Withlacoochee.  If  the  Indians  fight,  the  war  will  soon  he  ended.  If  they  disperse,  we  shall  have  a  tedious  and  arduous  service:  but  they  must  be  pursued  to  their  most  hidden  recesses.  Should  they  go  to  the  Everglades,  I  shall  follow  them,  and  for  that  purpose  I  have  re­quired boats  of  a  suitable  construction  to  be  prepared  at  New  Orleans.

    I  am,  sir,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    THOMAS  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                             Major  General  commanding.
The   Hon.  Secretary of  War,  
            Washington  City.

_________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,  
                                                                               Tampa Bay, November 6, 1836.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letters  of  the  8th  and  11th  of  October.  They  were forwarded  to  me  from  Columbus,  Georgia,  and  were  received  this  evening.

    The  marines,  under  Colonel  Henderson,  are  here.  I  have  also  about  500  regular  troops.  About  120  of  the Alabama  volunteers  arrived  today,  and  the  remainder  (say  180)  will  be  here  by  the  12th  ;  and  I  expect  by  that time  to  receive  horses  or  mules  from  New  Orleans  for  packing.  The moment they arrive, I shall take the field.

    Governor  Call,  from  whom  I  have  received  despatches  this  afternoon,  will  meet  me  on  the  Withlacoochee with  the  Tennesseans,  Floridians,  and  Indian  warriors.

    If  the  Indians  return  to  :fight  us,  we  shall  terminate  the  war  during  this  month;  but  should  they  disperse,  they  will  give  us  employment  the  greater  part  of  the  winter.

    I  have  received  order  No.  69,  and  hope  it  may  be  carried  out.

        I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                TH. S. JESUP
                                                                                 Major General commanding 
Brigadier  General  R. Jones, 
Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

_________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,  
                                                                             Tampa Bay, November 9, 1836.

    GENERAL:  I  have  the  honor  to  send,  herewith,  a  muster-roll  of  Captain  W. L.  Fry’s  company  of  mounted Alabama  volunteers,  which  was  mus­tered  into  the  service  of  the  United  States  by  General  Andrew  Moore,  of Alabama,  under  authority  from  Major  General  Jesup.

    I  am  instructed  by  General  Jesup  to  say,  that  when  the  company  was  called  into  service,  it  was  necessary  to  facilitate  the  emigration  of  the  Creek  Indians.  That  service  having  been  accomplished,  the  company  will  be ordered  to  report  for  duty  to  General  Wool,  in  the  Cherokee  na­tion;  who,  should  he  not  require  their  services,  will  have  them  discharged.

    Most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    J.  N.  CHAMBERS,  
                                                                            Lieutenant  and  Aid-de-camp. 
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones,  
Adjutant  General U.S.A.,  Washington  City

                                                            HEADQUARTERS,  FORT  BROOKE,  
                                                                           Tampa  Bay,  November  18,  1836.

    Sir  :  The  last  detachment  of  the  Alabama  volunteer  battalion  arrived  here  yesterday.  The  mules  ordered  from  New  Orleans  for  packing  have  not  yet  arrived.  The  moment  they  arrive,  I  shall  take  the  :field.  I  have  been  ready  for  two  weeks,  except  transportation.  The  time,  however,  has  not  been  lost,  as  I  have  employed  the  mounted  volunteers  in  scouring  the  country  ;  and  every  arrangement  has  been  made  for  the  most  vigorous  prosecution  of  the  war,  so  soon  as  the  means  of  transporting  a  few  days’  subsistence  and  forage  shall  be  obtained.  I  hope  to  move  by  the  20th.

    I  am,  sir,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    THO. S. JESUP
                                                                        Major General commanding
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones,  
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.  

_________

                                                HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                                                    Fort  Brooke,  Tampa  Bay,  November  20,  1836.

    Sir  :  Except  the  means  of  transportation,  I  have  been  ready  for  the  field  for  two  weeks  past.  A  vessel  with one  hundred  and  twelve  mules  arrived  evening  before  last.  we  are  getting  them  on  shore,  and  will  march  the  moment  they  can  be  broken  to  the  packs,  for  they  are  now  en­tirely  wild.  Mules  properly  broken  could  not,  I  am  told,  be  obtained.

    The  delay  here,  I  am  apprehensive,  will  derange  General  Cull’s  plan;  but  we  must  make  up  by  energy  and activity,  when  we  get  into  the  field,  for  the  unavoidable  delay  which  has  taken  place.  Among  the  numerous  disadvantages  to  the  service  incident  to  the  detention  here,  we  have  one advantage  at  least,  which  is,  the  arrival  of  the  last  detachment  of  the  Alabama  battalion.

    I  have  not  heard  from  General  Call  since  the  27th  of  last  month.  There  is  no  communination  by  land,  and  a  very  precarious  one  by  water  ;  con­sequently,  it  is  impossible  to  combine  the  movement  of  separate  columns, with  any  degree  of  certainty;  and  the  friendly  Seminoles  who  acted  as  guides  last  winter  having  been  all  sent  off  during  the  summer,  not  a  sin­gle  guide  or  pilot  can  be  obtained.

    I  am,  sir,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                THOS. S. JESUP
                                                                                                        Major General. 
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,  
                                                                           Tampa Bay, November 21, 1836.

    Sir  :  I  desire  that  the  enclosed  copy  of  a  letter  to  the  late  Colonel  Walk­er,  with  the  copy  of  his  letter  in reply,  referring  to a  mistake  in  a  report,  as  well  as  an  order  of  General  Scott,  and  a  misrepresentation  which has  been  circulated  widely  in  the  newspapers,  be  placed,  with  this  letter,  on  the  files  of  the  Adjutant  General’s  office  ;  and

    I  am,  sir,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                THOS. S.  JESUP,  
                                                                                                            Major General 
Brigadier General R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant General, Washington  City.

__________

                                    APPALACHICOLA, (FLORIDA,)  October  14,  1836.

    DEAR  Sir  :  A  writer  in  one  of  the  Virginia  papers,  who  represents  him­self  as  an  officer  of  the  army  under the  command  of  General  Scott,  has  charged  me  with  injustice  to  General  Moore,  in  not  reporting  several  hun­dred  prisoners  which  his  brigade  is  represented  as  having  taken  and  sent  to  me.  The  same  writer  says,  that  of  the  three  hundred  prisoners  sent  in  by  me  to  Fort  Mitchell,  two  hundred  and  :fifty  were  taken  by  General Moore.

    As  I  am  not  aware  of  any  prisoners  having  been  taken  by  General  Moore’s  command  ;  and  as  it  has  been asserted,  and  the  assertion  has  found  its  way  into  the  papers,  that  the  prisoners  taken  by  him  were  delivered  to  you  on  my  order,  I  beg  the  favor  of  you  to  answer  the  following  ques­tions  :  1st,  Were  any  prisoners  delivered to  yon  by  any  part  of  General  Moore’s  command,  and  if  so,  of  what  towns  were  they,  and  what  dispo­sition  was  made  of  them?  2d,  Were  any  of  the  prisoners  taken  to  Fort  Mitchell  captured  by  General  Moore’s command?  3d.  Did  not  Captain  Henderson,  of  General  Moore’s  command,  disarm  and  take  into  custody  Jim  Boy  and  his  warriors  of  the  Thloblocco-town,  and  Yelka-Hadjo  and  his  warriors  of  the  lower  Enfula  town,  who  were  at  the  time  preparing  to  accompany  me  on  the  campaign?  4th.  Were  these  chiefs,  or  their  war­riors,  at any  time  hostile?  5th.  Did  they  not  accompany  me  on  the  cam­paign  under  the  command  of  yourself  and General  Woodward,  and  perform  their  duty  faithfully  and  efficiently?  6th.  Were  there  any  other  In­dians  than those  of  Jim  Boy  and  Yelka-Hadjo  taken  and  delivered  to  you  by  Captain  Henderson,  or  any  other  officer  of  General  Moore’s  command?  7th.  Were  there,  to  your  knowledge,  any  hostile  Indians  captured  at  any  time  by  General  Moore’s  command,  and  sent  to  me  ?

    Respectfully, I am, dear sir, your obedient servant,

                                                                                                THOMAS S.  JESUP.
Colonel William Walker, 
of  Tuskegee,  now  at  Appalachicola.

    I certify that  the  above  is  a.  true  copy  of  the  original,  as  recorded  on  the  books  of  this  office.

ADJANT  GENERAL’S  OFFICE,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                        Tampa  Bay,  November  21,  1836.
                                                                        HENRY STANTON,
                                Brevet Lieut.  Col.  And  Adjt.  General, Army of the South.

__________

                                    APPALACHICOLA, (FLORIDA,) October 14, 1836.

    Sir  :  Your  letter  of  the  present  date  has  just  been  handed  to  me,  and  I  hasten  to  reply  to  the  questions  therein  proposed,  which  I  am  obliged  to  do  in  the  simplest  form,  as  my  indisposition  has  rendered  me  so  weak  as  to  compel  me  to  make  use  of  the  hand  of  another  to  commit  to  paper  all  I  have  to  communicate.

    1st  Question.  In  answer  to  your  first  question,  I  reply,  that  no  prisoners  were  delivered  to  me  by  any  part  of  General  Moore’s  command;

    2d  Question.  Answer. – No, not one.

    3d  Question.  Captain  Henderson,  of  General  Moore’s  command,  took  and  disarmed  Jim  Boy  and  Yelka  Hadjo  and  their  warriors,  when  they  were  actually  in  the  service  of  the  United  States  and  preparing  to  join  you  in  the  campaign.

    4th  Question.  No, never.

    5th  Question.  Yes, all  of  them.

    6th  Question.  No  other  Indians,  besides  those  above  mentioned,  were  delivered  to  roe  by  Captain  Henderson, or  by  any  officer  of  General  Moore’s  command,

    7th  Question.  Never to my knowledge.

                        Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 
                                                                                         WM. WALKER
Major General Jesup

    We,  the .undersigned,  hereby  certify  that  the  interrogatories  to  which  the  foregoing  are  answers,  were  put  and  answered  in  our  presence.

                                                                                    W.  S.  McCLINTOCK, 
                                                                                                Major U. S, Army
                                                                                    J.  A,  CHAMBERS,  
                                                                                    Lieutenant  U.  S.  artillery.

I  certify  that  the  foregoing  letters  and  certificate  are  true  copies  from  the originals.

                                                                                    J.  A,  CHAMBERS,  
                                                                                    Lieutenant  U.  S.  artillery
TAMPA  BAY,  November  21,  1836.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH
                                                            Tampa Bay, November 28, 1926

    Sir:  Sufficient  transportation  having  been  prepared,  I  put  the  troops  in  march  yesterday  for  the  Withlacoochee;  but  having  received  information  by  the  arrival  of  a  steamboat  with  several  officers,  that  Governor  Call  had  scoured  the  Cove  of  that  river  without  finding  an  Indian,  and  that  trails  in  a  southerly  direction  had  been  discovered  by  him,  and  also  that  he  had  moved  to  Volusia,  I  directed  the  troops  to  fall  back  and  resume their  position  here.

    My  last  communication  from  the  Governor  was  dated  the  27th  of  last month.  It  is  utterly  impossible  to combine  the  movements  of  separate  columns  in  a  country  like  this,  where  communications  cannot  be  kept  up.  The  whole  force  should  be  united,  and  depots  pushed  into  the  immediate  vicinity  of  the  strongholds  of  the  enemy.  To  be  able  to  do  so,  I  shall  put  myself  at  the  head  of  the  mounted  men  of  this  command  to-morrow morning,  and  dash  directly  through  to  Governor  Call’s  headquarters.  If  I  should  get  through,  I  will  report  to  you  immediately  from  the  other  side.

                                    I  am,  sir,  respectfully, 
                                                            Your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                THOS.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                                          Major  General. 
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
Adjutant General, Washington City

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, Volusia,  December  5,  1836.

    Sir  :  After  a  rapid  march  of  between  five  and  six  days,  I  arrived  here  last  night from  Tampa  Bay,  where  I found  Governor  Call  with  the  Ten­nessee  brigade,  the  Indian  regiment,  and  a  few  regular  troops  and  Florida  volunteers;  amounting,  altogether,  to  about  two  thousand  men.

    Your  instructions  to  me  of  the  4th  ultimo,  to  take  the  command  of  the  troops  in  Florida  and  the  direction  of  the  war  against  the  Seminoles,  have  not  yet  been  received;  but  Governor  Call  has  given  me  a  copy  of  them,  and  will  turn  over  the  command  to  me  the  moment  the  necessary returns  can  be  prepared.  I  shall  enter  upon  the  duties  assigned  me  without  the  confidence of success  entertained  by  the  members  of  the  Government,  or the  hope  of  fulfilling  the  expectations  of  the  President  or  the  country.  All  that  man  can  do  shall  be  done  ;  but  I  can  promise  nothing  more  than  to  do  my  duty  faithfully.  Other  troops  will  be  required,  and  that  imme­diately  ; otherwise,  a  failure  is  inevitable.

    The  term  of  service  of  at  least  two  hundred  of  the  regular  troops  will,  I  am  told,  expire  in  the  course  of  this  and  the  next  month,  and  not  a  man  will  re-enlist.  The  term  of  service  of  the  Tennessee  brigade  will  expire,  of  a  part  on  the  18th,  and  of  the  remainder  on  the  31st  of  the  present  month  ;  and  they  will  insist  on  going  home.  I  shall  then  be  left  with  troops  barely  sufficient  to  defend  the  necessary  depots,  without  any  for active  service  in  the  field. 

    I  requested  the  Governor  of  Alabama,  some  time  ago,  to  detach  a  force  of  five  companies,  either  volunteers  or  draughted  militia,  for  service  in  this  Territory  ;  and,  also,  to  complete  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield’s battalion  of  twelve  months’  volunteers  to  a  regiment,  I  also  requested  Governor  Schley,  of  Georgia,  to  detach  a regiment  of  twelve  months’  volunteers,  the  services  of  which  had  been  offered  to  me  last  fall,  but  which  I  did  not  then  feel  myself  authorized  to  accept.  I  have  not  heard  from  either  of  the  Governors – probably  from  the  difficulty  of  communications  reaching  me.  If  the  force  asked  from  them  should  be  sent  to  me,  it  will  supply  the  place  of  the  Tennesseans  ordered  to  Tampa  Bay;  it  would·  supply  the  place  of  the  discharges,  and  enable me  to  end  the  war  this  winter.  This  post  I  find  entirely  out  of  position;  but,  as  supplies  are  already  collected  here,  I  must  use  it  as  a  depot.  Fort  King  is  also  out  of  position;  but  as  you  have  directed  that  it  be  occupied,  I  shall  re-establish  it,  if  I  can  spare  troops  to  garrison  it.  I  have  already  established  a  depot,  twenty-five  miles in  advance  of  Tampa  Bay,  on  the  read  to  Fort  King,  and  propose  to  estab­lish  another  on  the  same  road,  at  the  point  where  it  crosses  the  Withla­coochee.  I  shall  also  establish  a  post  at  Punta-Rassa,  near  the  mouth  of  the  Langbell  river,  which  falls  into  Charlotte  harbor;  but,  to  effect  these  important  and  absolutely  necessary  objects, force  is  required.

    A  post  has  been  established  by  Governor  Call,  on  the  Withlacoochee,  twenty  miles  above  its  mouth.  If  the Indians  should  remain  on  that  river,  another  post  must  be  placed  near  the  Cove.  With  these  posts  es­tablished and  supplied,  the  war  may  be  carried  on  successfully  by  light  detachments,  operating  without  baggage,  and  striking  the  enemy  promptly and  unexpectedly  wherever  he  may  be  found. 

    As  an  act  of  justice  to  Governor  Call,  I  take  the  occasion  to  remark,  (and  I  stake  my  professional  reputation  on  the  correctness  of  the  remark,)  that  no  man  could,  under  the  circumstances  in  which  he  has  been  placed,  have  accomplished  more  than  he  has  done.  He  had  the  summer,  it  is  said  in  the  public  prints,  to  make  his  arrangements  for  a  winter  campaign  ;  but  he  could  not  establish  depots  without  force  to  defend  them.  And  it is  to  be  observed,  that  he  entered  upon  his  command  under  circumstances  of  embarrassment,  which  did  not  exist  when  the  campaign  of  last  year  commenced.  He  found  the  country  exhausted;  and  not  only  all  the  positions  occupied  during  the  campaign  abandoned,  but  the  whole  country,  from  the  Suwannee  to  the  Atlantic, except  Tampa  Bay  and  St.  Augustine, occu­pied  by  the  enemy.  His  plan  of  campaign  was  admirable  ;  but  there  were  circumstances  which  he  could  not  control  that  prevented  its  execu­tion.  If  I  should  fail,  (and,  unless  I  have  more  force,  I  certainly, shall,)  the  country  can  be  completely  defended  by mounted  rangers  only,  in  connexion  with  the  depots  which  I  propose  to  establish.  The  rangers  should  be  raised  during  the  present  winter,  and  should  have  a  rate  of  pay  to  command  the  services  of  the  best  men.  The  pay  of  the  regular  troops,  including  the  officers,  should  be  doubled,  to  secure  them  the  ordinary  comforts  during  their  service  in  Florida.  Let  me  entreat  you,  as  you  regard  the  best  in­terests  of  the  service,  to  impress upon  Congress  the  necessity  of  putting  the  army  upon  a  better  footing.  I  wish  nothing  myself,  and,  if  justice  can  be  done  to.  my  brave  companions,  I  will  cheerfully  serve  out  the  campaign  without  pay  or  emoluments.  I  shall  commence  operations  immediately  with  the  utmost  vigor  which  the  means  at  my  command  will  permit,  and  shall  keep  you  constantly  advised  of  my  progress.

With  high  consideration  and  respect,  I  am,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP.
The Honorable B. F. Butler, 
Secretary of War, Washington City.

__________

                                                Volusia, (FLORIDA,) December 5, 1836.

    Sir  :  I  was  not  able  to  obtain  the  means  of  transportation  for  even  ten  days’  supply  of  subsistence  and  forage  for  the  troops  under  my  command  at  Tampa  Bay  until  the  17th  of  last  month  :  the  mules  sent  for  that  pur­pose  from  New  Orleans  were  entirely  unbroken,  and  it  was  not  until  the  27th  that  I  was  able  to  commence  the  march  on  the  Withlacoochee,  When  the  troops  had  been  put  in  motion,  I  received  intelligence  that  Gov­ernor  Call  had  reached  that  river  on  the  13th,  had  swept  the  Cove,  and  had,  after  driving  the  Indians,  marched  across  the  country  to  this  post.

    I  immediately  countermanded  the  march  of  the  troops,  and,  putting  my­self  at  the  head  of  four  hundred  mounted  men,  on  the  27th  ultimo  pushed  through  the  country,  and  joined  the  Governor  last  night.

    On  the  3d  instant  my  spy  company  succeeded  in  capturing  an  Indian  near  the. Ocklawaha  river,  from  whom  I  received  information  of  the  situ­ation  of  a  village,  inhabited  by  negroes,  on  the  lake  in  which  the  river  has  its  source,  I  detached  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield,  of  the  Alabama  twelve  months’  volunteers,  with  orders  to burn  the  village  and  capture or  destroy  its  inhabitants.

    The  result  of  the  expedition  was  the  destruction  of  the  village  and  the  capture  of  forty-one  negroes.  The service  was  performed  in  the  most  prompt  and  handsome  manner.

    I  have  not  yet  received  a  return  of  the  troops  at  this  post,  nor  of  the  supplies  ;  but  I  hope  to  have  both  to-day.  After  which,  I  shall  be  able  to  form  some  idea  of  the  operations  proper  to  be  undertaken.

    I  have  not  yet  received  the  instructions  from  the  War  Department  to  assume  the  command  in  Florida.  They were forwarded,  ia  Fort  Clinch,  to  Tampa.  Bay;  and  the  messenger  had  not  arrived  there  when  I  took  my  departure  for  this  place.  Governor  Call,  however,  has  given  me  a  copy  of  them,  and  will  turn  over  the command  to  me as  soon  as  the  necessary  returns  can  be  prepared.

    I  have  the  honor,  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP.
                                                Major  General,  commanding  army  of  the  South.
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant General, Washington City.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH
                                                            Volusia (Florida), December 9, 1836

    Sir : The command of the forces in  Florida  was transferred yesterday.  I  would  greatly  have preferred that Governor Call has been permitted to close the  campaign.  He has had difficulties to encounter, of which no  man  can  form  an adequate  idea  who  has not  been  here.  I   have examined  carefully  the  state  of  the  service,  and.  have  looked  into  every  matter  con­nected  with  the  recent  operations;  and  I  am  sure  that  no  man  could  have  done  more,  under  the  circumstances.  He  established  this  post,  and  took  every  preliminary  step  to  supply  it.

    Supplies  and  means  of  transportation  are  rapidly  arriving,  and,  had  he retained  the  command,  he  would  soon  have  struck  an  important  blow.

·  The  term  of  service  of  the  Tennessee  volunteers  will  expire  in  a  few  days.  To  avail  myself  of  their  services in  the  attack  I  propose  to  make,  I  shall  move  sooner  than  in  my  own  judgment  I  ought  to  move,  and  may  have  to  fall  back;  but  I  am  so  arranging  my  depots,  that  if  compelled  to  relinquish  one  object,  I  shall  readily  strike  another.  If  I  should  not  suc­ceed  in  dislodging  Powell,  I  can,  on  returning  to  this  place,  strike  Mica­nopy, Philip,  and  Cooper,  who  are  about  a  day’s  march  from  each  other,  each  with  from  one  hundred  and  twenty  to  two  hundred  Indian  and  negro  warriors – the  latter,  perhaps,  the  more  numerous.  My  object  will  be  to strike them  in  succession,  and  prevent  them  from  concentrating.

    By  all  means  let  me  have  the  sixth  regiment;  and  if  any  companies  of  the  second  regiment  dragoons  have  been  raised,  let  me  have  them.

    This, you may be assured, is a negro,  not  an  Indian  war;  and  if  it  be  not  speedily  put  down,  the  South  will feel  the  effects  of  it  on  their  slave  population  before  the  end  of  the  next  season.

    Unless  the  army  be  placed  upon  a  better  footing,  it  will  disband  :  discharges  are  numerous,  and  no  old  soldiers  re-enlist.  The  officers  cannot  subsist  on  the  miserable  pittance  now  allowed  them  ;  they  should,  upon principles  of  common  justice,  be  placed  on  a  footing  with  corresponding  grades  in  the  navy.  You,  sir,  will command  their  gratitude,  and  render  an  important  service  to  the  country,  by  taking  the  lead  in  this  matter.

    Assure  the  President  that  whatsoever  promptness  and  energy  can  accomplish  shall  be  done.  ·

    With  high  consideration  and  respect,  I  am,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP. 
Hon.  B.  F.  Butler,
            Acting  Secretary  of  War,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH
                                                            Volusia (Florida), December 12, 1836

    Sir:  A  sufficient  supply  of  subsistence  having  been  received  yesterday  to  enable  me  to  move  with  twenty  days’  rations,  the  army  will  march  to­day.  The advance is now moving.  At  the  Ocklawaha  I shall  have  the  choice  of  two  objects – Micanopy,  :who  is  about  thirty  miles  south  of  the  point  where  I  shall  cross  that  river  ;  and  Powell,  who  is  about  fifty  miles southwest  of  it.

      I  propose,  after  placing  the  train  safely  across  the  Ocklawaha,  to  have a  sufficient  force  to  protect  it  ;  and, with  the  remainder,  make  a  forced March, and strike either Micanopy or Powell ; and, if successful with the first, immediately attack the other.

    My movements are not in accordance with my own judgment ; they are controlled by the necessity of availing myself of the few days that yet remain of the term of service of the Tennessee brigade ; and I am, therefore, compelled to march on their route, to the  mouth  of  the  Wiildac1lochee,  where  they expect to  embark  for  New  Orleans,  on  their  way  home.  This  movement  ·will  enable  me  to  strike  at  the  two  chiefs  mentioned  above,  and  to  cover  the  frontier  ; but  had  I  the  control  of  my  measures,  I  could  employ  the  force  to  march  to  more  advantage,  in  a  succession of  attacks  along  the  Ocklawaha,  and  thence  down  the  Withlacoochee.

    Without  a  strong  corps  of  wagon-drivers,  muleteers,  and  laborers,  it  is  almost  impossible  to  act  efficiently  in  this  country.  The  Southern  militia  do  not  labor  for  themselves,  and  consequently  cannot  or  will  not labor  for  the  public.  The  regular  troops  are  on  constant  fatigue  duty,  and  a road  leading  from  camp,  and  on  which  we are  to  march  to-day,  requiring  re­pair,  I  sent  instructions  to  General  Armstrong  last  night  to  move  forward   with his  brigade  and  cause  the  necessary  repairs  to  be  made.  He  replied  that  it  would  be  impossible,  as  his  men  would  not  work. I shall,  there­fore,  be  compelled  to  put  this  labor  also  upon  the  regular  troops.  .At  the  same  time  that  I  consider  Southern  volunteers  inefficient  for  many  purpo­ses,  it  is  due  to  them  to  say  that  they  are  efficient  whenever  rapid  marches  are  to  be  made,  or  an  enemy  to  be  fought.  Add  to  them  such  a  corps  as I  propose,  and  you  make  them  efficient  for  every  purpose.  

    Cannot  the  6th  regiment  of  infantry,  and  the  companies  of  the  2d  regi­ment  of  dragoons,  already  raised,  be  sent  to  Florida?  Volunteers  can  be  more  readily  obtained  for  service  on  the  Southwestern  frontier  than  for Florida.

    I  am,  sir,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding. 
The  Hon.  B.  F.  Butler, Acting  
            Secretary  of  War, Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                            Volusia,  (  Florida,)  December  12,  1836.

    Sir  :  The  term  of  service  of  the.  Tennessee  volunteers  will  expire  in  a  few  days;  I  shall  then  have  force  barely  sufficient  to  protect  the  necessary  depots,  and  the  trains  that  supply  them.  Cannot  the  sixth  regiment  be  sent  to  me?  It  is  now  at  Natchitoches,  and  could  reach  Tampa  Bay  in  three  weeks  from  the  receipt  of  the  order.  If  the  companies  of  the  second  regiment  of  dragoons,  already  raised,  were  here,  they  would  be  sufficient  to  protect  the  train  from  Black  creek  to  the  Withlacoochee,  and  to  cover  the  frontier,  and  would  leave  the  remainder  of  the  force  disposable.

    Cannot  something  be  done  for  the  army  ?  The  officers  should  be  placed  on  a  footing  with  those  of  the  navy  ;  and  all  officers  or  soldiers  who  are  serving,  or  have  served,  in  Florida,  below  the  rank  of  major general,  should have  grants  of  land.

    It  is  impossible  to  obtain  an  accurate  return  of  the  troops – of  course,  no return  can  be  made.  

    If I had one thousand volunteers or militia to take the place of the Tennesseans immediately, I should be able to terminate the war in sixty days. The prospects are flattering, even now ; but I am not sanguine of success. The country is not so difficult as it has been represented, but the difficulties which we find arise from the entire destitution of every kind  of  supply.

    To  pursue  the  Indians  in  the  swamps,  J  must  have  good  double-barreled  guns;  and  to  enable  me  to  keep  the  field  a  sufficient  length  of  time  to  render  any  service,  I  must  have  portable  soup.  I  shall  order  both.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding.
Brig,  Gen.  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                                        Camp  Dade,  December  17,  1836.

    Sir  :  The  army  under  my  command,  consisting  of  the  Tennessee  bri­gade,  and  Alabama  battalion,  with  about  three  hundred  regular  troops,  and  five  hundred  Indian  warriors;  arrived  in  this  vicinity  last  night.  To-day  I  have  had  the  Wahoo  swamp  completely  examined:  not  an  Indian  is  to  be  found  ;   and  the  friendly  warriors  are  of opinion  that  they  have  ail  gone  south.  From  the  appearance  of  their  trails,  they  are  supposed  to  have  retreated  soon  after  their  last  battle  with  the  troops  under  the  command  of  Governor  Call.

    I  propose  to  establish  a  post  on  the  Withlacoochee,  at  the  point  where  the  Fort  King  road  crosses  it  ;  and, after  supplying  it,  to  endeavor  to  cut  off  the  several  detachments  into  which  the  hostile  Indians  are  divided. The  service  will  be  arduous  and  difficult  ;  but;  if  a  small  force  be  sent  to  me,  sufficient  to  hold  the  necessary  posts,  and  the  6th  regiment  and  the  com­panies  of  the  2d  dragoons  already  raised  be  added  to  my  active  force in  the  field,  I  shall  not  despair  of  terminating  the  war  this  winter.  Should  I  fail,  the  country  can  be  secured during  the  next  summer  only  by  a  cordon  of  posts,  with  mounted  rangers,  constantly  patrolling  between  them.  The  rangers  should  be  raised  for  twelve  months,  but  be  liable  to  serve  during  the  war;  and  their  pay  should  be such  as  to  secure  the  services  of  the  best  men.

    The  regular  troops  who  serve  here,  from  brigadier  down,  should  have  grants  of’ land  ;  and  increased  pay  should  be  allowed  them.

    The  Cove  of  the  Withlacoochee  shall  be  examined  to-morrow  and  the  day  after;  but,  from  present  appearances,  I  have  no  expectation  of  finding an  Indian.  ·

    I  have  subsistence  with  me  for  twenty  days;  which,  when  the  Tennesseans  leave  me,  (and  the  term  of service  of  several  of  the  companies  has  already  expired.)  will  serve  my  diminished  force  for  a  month.

    The  horses  will  be  sent  to  Tampa  Bay  for  forage,  and  Colonel  Hender­son  and  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  will be  ordered  to  join  me,  with their disposable  force  and  twenty-five  days’  subsistence. 

    To  carry  on  the  war  in  the  swamps,  I  have  directed  Captain  d’Lagnel  to  purchase  two  hundred  double-barrelled  guns,  and  to  require  a  small piece of ordnance from the arsenal at Washington ; which I am told, may be transported on mules.

    Neither artificers nor laborers can be employed here ; and I have found it necessary to require Captain d’Lagnel to bring into the field a traveling force, with a number of ordnance artificers.

    To obtain wagon-drivers, the quartermaster has been obliged to all the volunteers two dollars a day ; they could not be obtained for less.

    I am, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP. 
The Hon. B. F. Butler, 
            Acting  Secretary  of  War,  Washington.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH 
                                                      Camp Dade, (  Florida, )  December  18,  1836. 

    SIR:  Since  I  wrote  to  you  yesterday,  I  have  resolved,  from  a  careful  consideration  of  all  the  circumstances  of  the  country  and  the  army,  to  place  a  depot  at  this  place,  leave  a  garrison  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  men  .to  defend  it,  and,  with  the  remainder  of  the  force  under  my  command,  to  proceed  down  the  Withlacoochee,  scouring  the  country  on  both  banks  to  its mouth.  ·

    By  the  movement  proposed,  I  shall  be  able  to  drive  out  all  the  Indians who may  remain  on  or  near  the  river,  to  cover  the  frontier,  and  ascertain  the  practicability  of  pushing  steamers  or  other  boats  up  to  the  forks.  If  .  boats  can  be  brought  up  to  that  point,  or.  within  a  day’s  march  of  it,  the  Indians  must  forever  abandon  their  settlements  in  the  Cove  and  the  swamps, of  the  river.

    The  Tennessee  volunteers  will  continue  with  me  until  this  movement  be performed,  though  the  term  of service  of  many  of  them  has  expired,  and  that  of  all  will  probably  have  expired  before  it  be  accomplished.

    The  prisoners  whom  I  have  taken  inform  me  that  it  is  the  purpose  of  Micanopy,  Jumper,  and  Abraham,  to  fly  before  the  army  and  avoid  a bat­tle.  They  will  hide  themselves  in  the  dense  swamps  and  hammocks  of  the Everglades.  Oceola  has  declared  his  intention to  maintain  himself  as  long  as  possible  on  the  Withlacoochee,  and then  fly  to  the  south  ;  but the  prisoners  say  he  will  never  surrender. 

    On  my  arrival  at  the  mouth  of  the  river,  the  Tennesseans  will  embark for  New  Orleans,  on  their  return homeward.  I  have  not  yet  been  appri­zed  of  any  force  having  been  ordered  to  replace  them.  My  last  despatches from  the  Department,  however,  are  dated  more  than  a  month  ago, and  I  have  not  yet  received  the  original  of my  instructions  of  the  4th  ultimo,  to  take  the  command  of  the  army  ;  but  I  have  a  copy  of  the  copy  sent  to Governor  Call,  under  which  I  am  acting. 

    With  the  force  mentioned  in  my  letter  of  yesterday,  I  shall  be  able  to  keep  the  field,  and,  if  the  enemy  can  be  found,  probably  bring  him  to terms.  ·

    I  hope  at  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee  to  receive  any  dispatch that  may  have  been  sent  to  me  from  the  Department  during  the  last  month  or  six  weeks;  and  have  the  honor  to  be,

    Most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                                                THOMAS  S.  JESUP.
Hon.  B.  F.  Butler, 
Acting Secretary of War, Washington, City

__________


                                                            FORT  BROOKE,  December  23,  1836.

    Sir:  After  writing  to  you  on  the  18th  instant,  I  ascertained  from  my  Indian  scouts  and  spies,  whom  I  had  kept  constantly  employed  in  scour­ing  the  country,  that  not  a  sign  of  hostile  Indians  could  be  discovered  at  or  near  any  of  their  strongholds  on  the  Withlacoochee,  All  the  trails  arc  in  a  southeasterly  direction;  and  Powell, if  he  has  not  been  deserted  by  his  followers,  has  probably  determined  to  draw  the  war  into  the  neigh­borhood  of  Micanopy,  Jumper,  and  Philip,  to  compel  them  to  adhere  to  him  with  their  warriors.  As  the  enemy  could  not  be  found  where  we  expected  him,  and  the  term  of  service  of  the  Tennessee  volunteers  having  expired,  I determined  to  avail  myself  of  the  movement  of  that  corps  to  send  the  wagon-train  to  Tampa  Bay  for  supplies  for  the  depots  which  I  had  found  it  necessary  to  establish.

    I  left  Brigadier  General  Armistead  in  command  of  the  forces  on  the  Withlacoochee,  with  orders  to  scour  the  country  from  Fort  King  to  that  river,  and  to  take  the  most  active  measures  to  find  the  enemy  ;  and  I  came  through  with  a  small  escort  to  Fort  Foster,  for  the  purpose  of  designating  the  points  to  be  occupied  as  depots  in  addition  to  those  already  established.  I  have  ordered  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  to  erect  a  work  on  the  Withlacoochee,  at  the  place  where  the  Fort  King  road  crosses  it.  It  will  be  completed  in  a  few  days,  and  a  wagon-train  will  leave  here  to-morrow  to  supply  it  with  subsistence,  forage,  tools,  &c.

    Learning,  by  express  from  Colonel  Henderson,  of  the  arrival  of  Commo­dore  Dallas,  I  came  hither  to  arrange  with  him  a  plan  of  combined  opera­tions  for  the  campaign.  He  is  several  miles  below,  but  I  expect  him  here  to-day.  I  have  established  an  abundant  depot  at  Fort  Foster,  twenty-five  miles  in  advance  of  this  place.  The fort  which  Lieutenant  Colonel  Fos­ter  is  erecting  on  the  Withlacoochee  is  twenty-nine  miles  in  advance  of  Fort  Foster.  Fort  Armstrong  is  fifteen  miles  farther  north,  near  the  point  where  the  road  from  Volusia  unites  with  the  road  to  Fort  King.  The  two  latter  posts  command  the  principal  retreats  of  the  enemy  on  the  Withlacoochee.  These  posts,  with  that  near  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee,  and  that  at  Volusia,  will  be  sufficient  for  the  present.

    Should  it  become  necessary  to  re-establish  Fort  King,  I  will  cause  a  strong  work  to  be  erected,  which  may  be  held  by  a  few  men,  and  supply  it  from  Fort  Drane.  The  ·moment  my  depot  shall  be  filled,  which  will  be  in  a  few  days,  small  as  my  force  is,  I  shall  commence  active  operations  in  the  field,  and  shall  prosecute  them  with  the  utmost  vigor  until  I  either  beat  the  enemy  or  be  beaten  by  him.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    THOMAS  S.  JESUP. 
The  Hon.  B.  F.  BUTLER,  
            Secretary  of  War,  Washington  City.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH., 
                                    Fort  Brooke,  Tampa  Bay,  December  23,  1836.

    Sir  :  Since  I  wrote  you  this  morning,  Commodore  Dallas  has  arrived,  and  has  offered  to  furnish  men  from  the  ships  of  war  under  his  command  to  defend  my  depots,  and  to  perform  any  other  service  at  the  posts  or  in  water  expeditions  which  the  public  interest  may  render  necessary.

    The  commodore  has  acted  on  this  occasion  with  the  same  disinterested  and  magnanimous  zeal  which distinguished  his  conduct  during  the  Creek  campaign.  His  co-operation,  which  I  most  readily  accept,  will relieve  me  from  many  embarrassments,  and  will  enable  me  to  take  the  field  several·  days  sooner  than  I  had  hoped.  He  will  send  an  officer  with  a  party  of  sailors,  to  ascertain  the  practicability  of  navigating  the  Withlacoochee,  and  will  furnish  the  force  to  garrison  Fort  Clinch  on  that  river.

    I  have  just  received  the  original  of  your  letter  of  instructions  of  the  4th  ultimo.  You  shall  not  be  disappointed  in  my  efforts,  though  you  may  be  in  their  results.  The  country  is  so  extensive,  and  contains so  many  hiding­ places  for  large  as  well  as  small  parties,  that  the  enemy  may  escape  me.

    Major  Nelson,  with  a  battalion  of  four  companies  of  mounted  volun­teers  from  Georgia,  arrived  and  reported  this  evening.  He came through direct from Fort Clinch to this place.  Two  companies  of  his  battalion  wore  retained by  Brigadier  General  Wool  in  the  Cherokee  country.  The four companies here amount to about two hundred men.  These,  with  the  Alabama  volunteers,  will  make  my  mounted  force  near  five  hundred  men.

    I  am  greatly  embarrassed  by  the  difficulty  of  obtaining  laborers,  drivers, and  artificers.  If  the  war  should  not  be  brought  to  a  close  in  a  few  weeks,  I  shall  send  to  Cuba  for  mule-drivers,  and  to  New  Jersey  for  artificers and  laborers.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    THOMAS  S.  JESUP. 
The  Hon.  B.  F.  Butler, 
            Secretary of War, Washington City

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,
                                                                        Tampa Bay,  December  27,  1836.

    General:  Your  letter  of  the  12th  ultimo,  in  relation  to  depredations  committed  on  the  plantation  of  the  Hon. John  Forsyth,  I  have  the  honor  to  state  has  been  received.  I  am  instructed  to  enclose  two  letters  on  the  subject,  presented  by  Colonel  Henderson,  commandant  of  the  marine  corps,  in  answer  to  inquiries  made  by  General  Jesup;  and  to  state  that .  these  contain  all  the  information  that  the  general  has  been  able  to  collect.

    Personally  he  knows  nothing,  as  he  was  hot  in  the  neighborhood,  nor  even  in  command  of  the  army,  at  the  period  at  which  the  depredations  are  said to  have  been  committed.  ·

    I  am,  general,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    J.  A.  CHAMBERS, 
                                                                             Lieutenant and Aid-de-camp
Brig.  General  R.  JONES, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington.

                                                            FORT  BROOKE,  December  24,  1836.

    General:  Your  letter  of  the  12th  November,  covering  an  affidavit  of  Abraham  Collins,  has  been  received.  I  enclose  a  communication  from  Lieut.  Lindsay  in  relation  to  it :  he  was  then  acting  as  quartermaster.

    On  the  evening  of  the  24th  June  last,  five  companies  of  the  marine  corps  under  my  command,  with  a  train  of  wagons,  encamped  on  the  plant­ation of  Mr.  Forsyth.  On  the  25th,  the  troops,  with  most  of  the  wagons,  crossed  the  Chattahoochie,  and  occupied  a  position  near  the  bank  of  the river  opposite  the  said  plantation. 

    At  this  time  the  cotton  was  almost  entirely  overgrown  with  weeds  and  grass,  from  not  having  been  worked in  proper  season.  It  is  not  in  my  power  to  state  why  this  cotton-field  was  not  worked.  The  field  was  directly on  the  river,  and  within  rifle  range  from  the  opposite  bank.  The  river  was  so  narrow  immediately  at  the  place  where  the  ferry  was  estab­lished,  that  the  captain  of  a  steamboat  fired  a  pistol  three  times  at  a  tree  on  the  opposite  side,  and  hit  it  each  time.

    The  opposite  side  of  the  river,  for  many  miles  above  and  below,  was  in  possession  of  the  band  of  Creek  Indians  most  actively  engaged  at  that  time  in  hostilities  against  the  whites.  This  was  the  case  at  the  most critical  period  for  the  cotton  crops.  This may have prevented Mr.  Collins from working this field.

    I  recollect Mr.  Collins  informing  me  that  the  horses  of  Captain  Love’s  company  were  turned  into  the  field, and  that  he  had  protested  against  it.  That  officer  may  have  supposed  that  all  intention  of  working  the  field  had  been  abandoned,  and  therefore  concluded  that  there  could  be  no  impropriety  in  turning  the  horses  into  it.

    The  arrival  of  the  marines,  so  far  from  being  injurious  to  the  operations  on  the  place,  at  once  gave  security  to  everything  on  it.  Two  wagons  were  employed  in  hauling  timber  through  it,  to  construct  a  field-work  on  the  opposite  bank.  I  presume  they  made  but  one  track  through  the  field,  and  the  injury  sustained  from  this  was certainly  requited  by  the  entire  security  to  the  slaves  employed  in  working  it.

    Jim  Henry,  with  the  only  party  of  hostile  Indians  of  any  consequence  then  in  arms,  occupied  the  swamps within  a  few  miles  of  the  position  taken  by  the  troops  under  my  command.  If  Mr.  Collins  believed  that  the field  could  be  worked  with  any  advantage  at  this  time,  the  security  given  to  the  negroes  by  the  troops  should  have  been  considered  by  him  as  a  full  offset  for  the  small  injury  sustained  from  the  passage  of  the  men and wagons  through  the  field.  ·

    Under  these  circumstances,  I  am  led  to  the  belief  that  Mr.  Forsyth’s  interests  were  rather  promoted  by  the  presence  of  the  marines  on  and  near  his  plantation,  than  injured.

    I  remain,  general,  with  great  “respect,  your  obedient  servant,

.                                               ARCH.  HENDERSON,  Col.  Commandant
Brig.  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adj. Gen. U.S. Army, Headquarters, Washington

__________

                                                                        Fort Brooke, Tampa Bay, 
                                                                                                December  24,  1836.

    Sir:  I  have  carefully  read  the  deposition  you  handed  me  of  Abraham Collins,  of  Muscogee  county,  Georgia., on  the  subject  of  depredations  committed  on  the  plantation  of  the  Hon.  J.  Forsyth.  As  the  acting  quartermaster of  marines,  I  am  enabled  to  state,  that,  so  far  as  the  corps  of  marines  are  concerned,  no  injury  was  done  by  them  to  the  cotton  crop during  the  one  night  that  we  were  encamped  there.  In  selecting  the  ground  of  encampment,  as  was  my  duty,  I  was  particularly  careful  to  place  the  corps  immediately  on  the  river  bank,  (the  main  road leading  directly  to  it.)  where  we  could  not  possibly  interfere  with  the  growing  cotton.  Indeed,  so particular  was  I  upon  the  location  of  the  encampment,  that  I  expressed  my  solicitude  to  the  overseer,  Mr. Collins,  about  the  crop,  and  observed  that  every  effort  should  be  made  not  to  injure  it.  He  replied  to  my  ob­servation,  by  saying  that  it  was  then  too  late  to  preserve  the  cotton,  the  rank  growth  of  grass  having  obtained  the  ascendency,  and  that  I  need  not  be  particular,  but  encamp  where  I  pleased.  Subsequently, I frequently heard Mr.  Collins  observe  that  Captain  Love,  with  his  lawless  company,  had  ruined  his  cotton-field,  and  that  he  had often  threatened  to  shoot  the  horses  they  had  turned  in  there.  The  overseer  is,  doubtless,  conscientious  in  his deposition;  but  abundance  of  proof  can  be  given  that  he  has  asserted  very  little  fact  in  the  second  page.  The  wagons  and  horses;  as  it  is  well  known  to  you,  sir,  were,  with  the  exception  of  two,  all  on  the  west  bank  of  the  Chattahoochie  during  the  three  weeks  he  alludes  to.  But  it  is  use­less  to  remark  on  the  remainder  of  the  letter.  The  Hon.  J.  Forsyth  would  have  been  sufficiently  served,  if  his  overseer  had  not  touched  upon  the  depredations  committed  on  his  property  after  it  had  been  destroyed  by  the  Georgia  volunteers,  I  will  simply add,  that  I  conscientiously  believe  the  crop  was  destroyed  by  their  wantonness.

    I  am,  sir,  very  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    G.  S.  LINDSAY.
Colonel  A.  HENDERSON,  
            Commander  of  Marines.

                                    HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,  
                                                                        Tampa  Bay,  December  27,  1836.

    General:  When  the  Washington  city  volunteers  joined  the  army,  they  were  reported  by  their  captain  as  having  been  mustered  into  service  for  twelve  months.  Many  of  the  men,  however,  state  that  they  entered  only  for  six months;  and,  if  they  were  mustered  for  a  longer  period,  they  were  deceived,  and  it  was  contrary  to  their  intentions.  I  am  commanded  by  the  general  to  ask  an  official  statement  of  the  facts  in  the  case,  and  to  suggest,  that  if  the  company  have  been  deceived,  and  were  mustered  for  a  longer  period  than  they  intended,  whether  it  would  not  be  advisable  to  have  them  discharged.  The  company  has  performed  its  duty  faithfully; and,  in  every  case,  met  the  approbation  of  the  officers  under  whose  im­mediate  command  it  has  served.

    I  am,  general,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                            J.  A.  CHAMBERS,  Lieut.  and  A.D.C.
General  R.  JONES, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington.

__________


                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH, 
                                                                                    Tampa Bay, January 1, 1837.

    Sir  :  The  principal  Indian  chief  of  the  regiment  of  Indian  warriors  in  the  service  of  the  United  States  came  in  yesterday,  and  brought  me  reports  from  Brigadier  General  Armistead,  commanding  on  the  Withla­coochee,  and Major  Morris,  commanding  the  Indian  force.  Occupied  as  every  one  about  me  is,  in  active  preparation  for  the field,  I  cannot  send  copies  of  the  reports  ;  but  no  Indians  were  found  in  that  part  of  the  coun­try,  and  all  the  information  which  I  have  been  able  to  obtain  leads  me  to  the  belief  that  the  body  of  the  nation  are  south  and  southeast. 

    The  troops  in  the  interior  are  actively  engaged,  and  I  shall  join  them  immediately.  Commodore  Dallas  has  sent  sixty  sailors  to  garrison  Fort  Foster,  twenty-five  miles  east  of  this  place.  He  despatched  a  garrison yesterday  to  Fort  Clinch,  and  has  promised  a  garrison  for  this  place  :  this  will  increase  the  active  force  for  the field,  There  is  so  much  sickness,  however,  among  the  volunteers  and  regular  troops,  that  I  shall  not  have  more  than  nine  hundred  or  a  thousand  of  them  altogether  for  active  ser­vice,  and  at  least  a  hundred  of  them  will  be  required  for  convoys.  The  Indians  are  entirely  broken  down,  most  of  them  are  sick,  and  I  expect  no  further  service  from  them.  They will go home the last of this month.  Such  of  them  as  ore  fit  for  service  I  will  prevail upon  to  accompany  me,  if  possible,  on  an  expedition  against  the  principal  chief  of  the  Seminoles,  Micanopy.  He  is  said  to  be  within  four  days’  march  of  me.

    General  Gaines  has  ordered  the  6th  regiment  to  join  me.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                                            Major  General.
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones,
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                Fort  Armstrong;  (  Florida,)  January  10,  1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  only  time  to  say  that  a  detachment  from  this  army  sur­prised  a  camp  of  Indian  negroes,  and  made  sixteen  prisoners.  They  are  of  Powell’s  band,  and  the  mounted  men  are  now  in  full  pursuit  of  that  chief.  The enemy is nowhere found in great force.  The  great  body  of  the  Seminoles  are  said  to  be  south.  The  moment the  regular  troops  come  up,  which  will  probably  be  to-morrow,  I  shall  either  send  or  take a  heavy  detachment in  that  direction. 

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding.

Brigadier  General  R.  Jones,  
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

            HEADQUARTERS, NEAR THE COVE OF THE WITHLACOOCHEE, 
                                                                                                January  12,  1837.

    Sir:  In  my  last  letter  I  informed  you  that  the  mounted  men  of  my  command  were  in  pursuit  of  Powell.  Thirty-six  negroes,  in  addition  to  those  already  reported,  (  16,)  have  been  captured  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield’s  battalion  and  the  Indian  warriors;  from  them  we  learn  that  the  Indians  have  entirely  dispersed,  and  that  Powell  has  with  him  only  three  warriors  and  his  family.  One  of  the  negroes,  Primus,  who  was  sent  as  a  messenger  to  the  Indians  by  General  Scott  or  Clinch  during  the  last  winter,  and  remained  with  them,  says  that he  is  on  the  Withlacoochee,  sick,  and  that  he  can  collect  about  a  hundred  warriors.  Learning  from  the prisoners  that  the  Tallahassee  chief  is  on  the  Withlacoochee  with  his  warriors,  I  despatched  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  down  the  south  side  of  the  river,  with  a  small  battalion  of  infantry,  a  company  of  artillery,  and  Major Nelson’s  battalion  of  mounted  Georgians,  altogether  about  three  hundred  men;  and  moved  down  the  north  side  of  the  river  with  the  marines,  a  detachment  of  artillery,  a  battalion  of  Alabama  volun­teers,  and  a  detachment  of  Indian  warriors – in  all,  about  seven  hundred  men – for  the  purpose  of  clearing  the  country  on  both  sides  of  every  hostile  band.

    The  Tallahassee  Indians  are  said  to  be  in  the  neighborhood;  Powell  also.  Two  days  will  be  employed  in examining  the  swamps,  when,  if  the  enemy  should  not  be  found,  I  shall  proceed  down  the  river,  unite  with  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster,  and  then  be  governed  by  circumstances.  If  I  should  not  hear  of  the  enemy  below,  I  shall  return  to  Fort  Arm­strong,  and  immediately  proceed  against  Micanopy  and  Jumper,  who,  I  have  good reasons  to  believe,  are  on  the  head-waters  of  the  Ocklawaha,  The  campaign  will  be  tedious,  but  I  hope successful  in  the  end.  I  am  not,  however,  very  sanguine;  the  difficulty  is,  not  to  fight  the  enemy,  but  to  find him.  I  am  unable  to  furnish  returns,  at  present,  of  the  force  under  my  command.  The  difficulties  in  regard  to transportation  are  such,  that  every  officer  is  obliged  to  carry  several  days’  rations  in  his  haversack.  I often carry subsistence sufficient for six days.  The  means  of  making  correct  returns  are  not,  therefore,  within  the  reach  of  any  officer  of  this  army.  The  blank  returns  to  which  you  refer  have  not  been  received.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    TH.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                        Major  General  commanding. 
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY OF THE SOUTH,
                                                                        Camp  Izard,  January  17,  1837.

    Sir  :  The  army  under  my  .command  has,  swept  the  swamp  of  the  Withlacoochee,  on  the  north  side,  from  Fort  Armstrong,  at  Dade’s  bat­tle-ground,  to  this  place ;  and a  detachment  under  Lieutenant  Colonel Foster  moved  down  the  south  side  to  Fort  Clinch.  The  result  of  our  operations  bas  been  the  capture  of  fifty-two  negroes  and  three  Indians,  and  the  positive  knowledge  that  there  are  no  Indians  on  the  river,  except  small  parties  who  are  flying  through  and  hiding  in  the  swamps,  with  no  other  means  of  subsistence  than  roots,  palmetto  cabbage,  and  occasionally indifferent  beef,

    I  moved  down  to  Fort  Clinch  with  the  mounted  men  on  the  15th, where  I  met  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster, and,  learning  from  a  prisoner  that  the  women  and  children  with  the  aged  and  sick  of  the  Tallahassee  and  Ogechee  Indians  occupy  a  position  in  a  swamp  about  thirty  miles  south  of  Fort  Clinch,  I  detached  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  yesterday  with  about  four  hundred  regular  troops  and  Georgia  volunteers,  and  a  hundred  Indian  warriors,  to  attack,  and,  if  possible,  capture  them.

    I  have  to-day  ordered  Major  McClintock.  to  Fort  Drane,  with  about  eighty  regular  troops,  to  take  the  command  of  that  post,  and  endeavor  to  drive  off  the  small  bands  of  Indians  who  infest  that  neighborhood.  Powell  is  flying,  it  appears,  with  his  family  and  a  band  of  not  more  than  three  warriors.  The  prisoners  now  say  that  he  has  gone  to  Ocklawaha.

    I  shall  return  immediately  to  Fort  Armstrong,  where  I  shall  send  expeditions  into  the  country  between  that  post  and  Volusia;  and  I  shall  conduct  an  expedition  myself  against  Micanopy,  the  principal  chief  of the  Seminoles,  on  the  head  of  the  Ocklawaha. 

    A  part  of  this  army  has  been  on  this  river  actively  engaged  in  exam­ining  its  swamps  and  hammocks  since  the  17th  of  last  month,  They  have  constructed  two  forts,  and  erected  bridges  over  both  branches  of  the Withlacoochee.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

                                                                        THOS.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding.
Brig.  Gen.  R.  Jones, 
Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                                        Fort  .Armstrong,  January  19,  1887,

    Sir:  I  have  this  moment  arrived  at  this  post  in  advance  of  the  troops,  having  completely  swept  the  swamps  and  hammocks  of  the  Withlacoo­chee,  from  the  Fort  King  road  to  Fort  Clinch;  and  I  am  positive  that  there  are  no  parties  of  Indians  exceeding  ten  warriors  on  the  river  or  in its  neighborhood.  .

    The  prisoners  represent  Powell  as  flying  from  one  biding-place  to  another,  with  only  three  warriors.  I  returned  thither  with  a  small  escort  to  make  arrangements  in  anticipation  of  the  arrival  of  the  troops,  to  carry  on  an  expedition  against  the  Indians  on  the  head-waters  of  the  Ocklawaha.  In  that  expedition  I  had  calculated on  the  co-operation  of  the  6th  regiment  of  infantry,  and  its  aid  will  be  necessary.  Seven  companies  of  the   regiment  have  arrived;  but  Major  Thompson,  who  commands,  has  received  orders  to-day  to  return  to  the  Texas frontier.  If  he  returns  immediately,  I  must  abandon  the  proposed  expedition. 

    I  consider  it  of  too  much  importance  in  its  bearing  upon  the  successful result  of  the  campaign,  to  be  given up  ;  and  I  therefore  feel  it  to  be  my duty to retain the regiment, until its place be supplies by other  troops.

    I detaches Lieutenant Colonel Foster, from Fort Clinch, with five hundred regular troops, Georgia volunteers, and Indian warriors, against the Tallahassee  and  Ogechee  Indians,  who  had  fled  from  the  Withlacoochee,  and  have  established  themselves  in  the  swamps  south  of  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee;  and,  in  consequence  of  information from  Fort  Drane,  I  was  compelled to  detach  Major  McClintock  with  the  third  .artillery  of  that post.

    A  small  battalion  of  Alabama  draughts  have  arrived  at  Tampa  Bay,  but I  cannot  use  them  for  any  military  purpose,  in  consequence  of  the  measles  prevailing  among  them.  

    The  dragoons  promised  in  a  communication  from  the  Adjutant  General  had  not  arrived  when  I  last  heard  from  the  officer  commanding  at  Garey’s  Ferry,  nor  had  the  South  Carolina  draughts. 

    The  Indian  warriors  are  sickly, and  will  leave  the  service  on  the  last of  this  month,  in  order  to  make  arrangements to  arrive  in  Arkansas  in time  to  plant  corn  for  the  next  season,

    I  have  some  reason  to  complain  that  orders  should  be  published,  directing  recruits  in  large  numbers  to  join,  when the  men  have  not  been  enlisted.  A  wrong  impression  is  thus  produced  upon  the  public  mind  ;  and  where  error  has got  the  start,  it  is  difficult  for  truth  to  overtake  it.

    The  service  is  a  most  arduous  one  in  Florida  ;  so  much  so,  that  not  a man  whose  term  of  service  expires  will  re-enlist.·

    I  am  happy  to  find  that  you  have  recommended  a  bounty  in  land  to  the soldiers;  it  should,  in  strict  justice,  be  extended  to  the  regimental  and  junior  staff  officers,

    With  high  consideration  and  respect,  I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your obedient  servant,

                                                                                    THOS.  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                        Major  General  commanding.
The  Hon,  B.  F,  Butler, 
Secretary  of  War,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH, 
                                                            Fort  Armstrong,  near  Dade’s  
                                                                        battle-ground,  January  20,  1837

·  Sir  :  I  arrived  here  yesterday  with  a  small  mounted  corps,  and  a  few  Indian  warriors  from  Fort  Clinch  ;  the  marines and  regular  troops  came in  to-day.

    All  the  swamps  and  hammocks,  as  far  down  as  General  Gaines’s  battle-ground,  have  been  examined,  with  no  other  results  than  the  breaking  up of  a  negro  settlement  in  the  Pano  Saufkee  swamp,  and  the  capture  of fifty-two  negroes  and  three  Indians.

    Powell  was  in  the  swamp  with  the  negroes,  but  escaped,  the  prisoners say,  attended  by  only  three  warriors.  The  Indians  are  represented  as flying  in  small  parties  from  swamp  to  swamp,  almost  naked.  A  part  of  them  were  represented  by  a  prisoner  to  have  taken  refuge  in  a  large  swamp  south  of  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee.  I  have detached  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  to-attack  or  capture  them

    I  came  to  this  place  to  prepare  for  an  expedition  against  the  Indians, on  the  head  of  the  Ocklawaha;  but,  on  my  arrival,  I  found  that  Major Thompson  had  been  ordered  to  return  with  the  6th  regiment  to  Louisiana.  I  was  reduced  to  the  disagreeable  alternative  of  giving  up  the  ex­pedition,  or  retaining  the  6th  for  a  few  days.  The  interests  of the  ser­vice,  in  my  judgment,  required  the  latter  course.

    I  think  the  service  will  not  occupy  more  than  ten  or  fifteen  days,  when I  shall  direct  Major  Thompson  to  proceed  to  his  former  station.

    From  the  small  force  under  my  command,  I  have  to  hold  the  interior  of  this  country,  protect  the  trains  on  long  routes,  and  furnish  garrisons for  numerous  posts.  The  service  has  been  so  severe,  that  the  sick  are  increasing  in  an  alarming  manner. 

    I  send  you  a  morning  report  of  the  Alabama  .mounted  battalion,  by, which  you  will  observe that  nearly  a  third  of  the  whole  force  are  sick;  and  the  regular  force  is  rapidly  diminishing  by  discharges  and  sickness.  About  one-half  of  the  warriors  of  the  Indian  regiment  are  sick,  or  conva­lescent  ;  and  that  corps  is  so completely  broken  down  by  the  severe  ser­vice  it  has  performed,  as  to  be  entirely  inefficient.

    The  chiefs  insist  on  returning  to  Alabama  at  the  end  of  this  month,  to  make  arrangements  for  the  removal of  themselves  and  people  to  Arkansas.

    They  will  have  barely  time  to  reach  their  new  homes  .in  time  to  plant their  corn.  

    I  am,  sir,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant, 

                                                                                    THOS.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                        Major  General  commanding
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                        Fort  Armstrong,  January  21,  1837,  half-past  9  o’clock,  P.  M.

    Sir  :  An  Indian  runner  has  this  moment  come  in  from  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster’s  command,  with  intelligence  of  the  troops  having  over·  taken  a  party  of  hostile  Indians  and  negroes,  of  which  they  killed  two,  and  captured  eleven  Indians  and  nine  negroes  ;  the  remainder  escaped.

    The  Indians  are  represented  as  desirous  of  peace  ;  and  I  have  directed  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  to  send one  of  the  prisoners  to  invite  them  to  come  in.

    I  march  to-morrow  morning,  at  sunrise,  to  the  head  of  the  Ocklawaha.

    I  have  the  honor,  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,  .

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding
Brig.  Gen.  R.  JONES,
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                                                            Fort  Armstrong,  January  21,  1837.

    Sir:  I  have  this  moment  received,  by  express  from  Fort  Drane,  your  letter  of  the  4th  inst.  I  shall  find Volusia  a  valuable  depot  in  my  opera­tions  on  the  St.  John’s’  and  the  Ocklawaha,  to  the  swamps  of  which rivers  all  accounts  concur  that  the  enemy  have  retired.  The  troops  have  been  actively  employed,  but  we  have accomplished  little,  except  obtaining  a  knowledge  of  the  country,  and  establishing  a  line  of  posts  to  command  it.

    I  march  at  sunrise  to-morrow  morning  for  Hapapka,  near  the  head of  the  Ocklawaha,  where  Micanopy,  Jumper,  Alligator,  and  other  chiefs,  are  said  to  have  concentrated  their  forces.  If  we  can  bring  them  to  ac­tion,  the  war  may  be  soon  terminated;  but  the  danger  is  they  will  disperse,  as  the  Indians  on  the  Withlacoochee have  done.

    The  prisoners  say  that  some  division  exists  in  the  councils  of  the  chiefs,  and  that  many  of  them  are  tired  of the  war.  After  showing  them  that  we  are  able  to  follow  them  to  their  most  secure  retreats,  I  will  endeavor  to  open  a  communication  with  them  and  offer  them  peace.

    l  have  ordered  Lieutenant  Colonel  Fanning  to  move  up  the  St.  John’s  to  Topekaliga  with  the  forces  under  his  command,  and  as  large  supplies  of  subsistence  and  forage  as  he  can  transport,  to  attack  the  chief  Philip,  and  to  co-operate  with  me.

    Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  is  in  pursuit  of  the  Tallahassees  and  Ogeehees,  south  of  the  Withlacoochee;  and Major  McClintock  has  been  or­dered  to  Fort  Drane,  to  secure  that  depot,  and  drive  the  Indians  from the  adjacent  country.

    Two  companies  of  dragoons  will  be  employed  in  clearing  the  country between  the  St.  John’s  and  the  Suwannee,  and  General  Hernandez  is  charged  with  the  defence  of  the  country  east  of  the  St.  John’s.

    Most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,  ·

                                                                                    THOS.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                        Major  General  commanding.
Hon.  B.  F.  Butler,
            Secretary  of  War,  Washington  City.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                                        Fort  Armstrong,  February  7,  1837.

    Sir:  I  returned  last  night  from  an  expedition  to  the  head  of  the  Coloo­sahatchee,  about  seventy  miles  southeast  of  this  place,  having  left  the  army  .about  thirty  miles  back.

    The  expedition  has  been  so  far  successful  that  we  came  up  with  the  enemy  on  the  27th  ultimo,  and  the advance  under  Colonel  Henderson  at­tacked  and  beat  them  near  the  Hatcheeluskee,  This  led  to  a  conference  with  the  hostile  chiefs,  Jumper,  Alligator,  and  Abraham,  who  have  agreed  to  meet  me,  with  the  other  chiefs  of  the  nation,  on  the  l8th  instant,  to  dis­cuss  the  terms  of  a  peace,  or  rather  to  inform  me  whether  they  will  ac­cept  the  terms  which  I  have  offered.

    I  have  required  a  strict  observance  of  the  terms  of  the  treaty,  and  have  demanded  immediate  emigration  as an  indispensable  condition,

    There  would  be  no  difficulty  in  making  peace  and  giving  immediate  se­curity  to  the  country,  if  it  were  not  for  that  condition;  but  the  chiefs  say  that  their  people  cannot  live  in  the country  assigned  to  them.in consequence  of  the  coldness  of  the  climate.  They  are  here  below  the  28th  degree  of  north  latitude,  and  will  there  be  above  the  34th.  The  negroes,  too,  who  rule  the  Indians,  are  all  averse  to  removing  to  so  cold  a  climate.

    Seven  companies  of  the  6th  infantry  having  arrived,  I  assumed  the  re­sponsibility  of  taking  them  into  the  field:  without  them,  I  could  not  have  ex­ecuted  my  plan,  which  has  resulted  so  favorably,  To  send  any  troops  out  of  the  country  at  the  present  crisis,  would  jeopardize  all  we  have  gained,  I  therefore  feel  it  to  be  my  imperious  duty  to  retain  them  till  the  result  of  the  conference  with  the  hostile  chiefs,  to  take  place  on  the  18th,  shall  be  known.

    Should  that  conference  result  us  we  hope  it  may,  all  the  troops  in  Florida  will  then  be  disposable  for  service  elsewhere.

    I  hope  that  you  and  the  President  may  approve  of  the  measure;  and  I  am,  sir,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding.
The  Hon.  B.  F. Butler,  
            Secretary  of  War,  Washington  City.

                                    HEADQUARTERs,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                                                            Fort  Armstrong,  February  7,  1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  report,  for  the  information  of  the  Secretary  of  War  and  the  General–in-chief,  that the  main  body  of  the  army  under  my  command  was  put  in  motion  on  the 22d  ultimo,  to  attack  the  Indians  and  negroes  in  the  strongholds  which  they  were  said  to  occupy  on  the  head  waters  of  the  Ocklawaha.

    On  the  23d,  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield  was  detached  with  his  battalion  of  mounted  Alabama  volunteers, Captain  Harris’s  company  of  marines,  and  Major  Morris’s  Indian  warriors,  accompanied  by  my  aid,  Lieutenant Chambers,  to  attack  Osuchee,  (Cooper,)  a  chief  of  some  note,  who  was  re­ported  to  have  a  large  Indian  force  under  his  command,  in  a  swamp  on  the  borders  of  Hapapka  lake.  The  chief  was  surprised,  himself  and  three  warriors  killed,  and  nine  Indians  (women  and  children)  and  eight  negroes captured.  One  of  our  Indian  warriors  was  mortally  wounded,  and  died  on  the  26th.

    It  was  ascertained  from  the  prisoners  that  the  principal  Indian  and  ne­gro  force  had  retired  from  the  Ocklawaha,  in  a  southeasterly  direction,  to­wards  the  head  of  the  Coloosahatchee.  Pursuit  was  immediately  com­menced,  with  no  other  guide  than  the  track  of  their  ponies  and  cattle.

    The  Thlawhatkee,  (White  mountains,)  an  elevated  range  of  hills  not  mentioned  by  any  geographer,  nor described  in  any  account  of  Florida  which  I  have  seen,  was  passed  on  the  24th.  The  ascent  in  many  places  was  so  difficult  as  to  render  drag-ropes  and  heavy  details  of  men  necessary  to  take  the  baggage-wagons  over  the  heights. 

    On  approaching  the  Thla-pace-hatchee,  on  the  morning  of  the  27th,  the  herds  of  cattle  feeding on  the  prairies,  and  the  numerous  recent  trails,  in  various  directions,  indicated  the  presence  of  the  enemy.  The  army was  halted,  and  scouts  sent  out  on  different  trails  to  obtain  information.

    Colonel  Henderson,  with  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield’s  battalion,  Captain  Harris’s  mounted.  marines,  and Major  Morris’s  Indian  warriors,  accompa­nied  by  my  aid,  Lieutenant  Chambers,  was  detached  to  make  a  reconnois­ance  of  the  country  in  advance,  with  orders  to  attack  the  enemy  if  he  should  find  them  and  deem  his command  sufficient,  and  report  by  ex­press  their  force  and  position.

   The  enemy  was  found  on  the  Hatcheeluskee,  in  and  near  the  “Great  Cypress  swamp,”  and  promptly  and  gallantly  attacked.  Lieutenant  Chambers,  with  Price’s  company  of  Alabama  volunteers,  by  a  rapid  charge, succeeded  in  capturing  the  horses  and  baggage  of  the  enemy,  with  twenty-five  Indians  and  negroes,  principally  women  and  children;  the  men  having  all  fled  into  the  swamp.

    Colonel  Henderson,  leaving  one  company  with  the  prisoners  and  horses,  entered  the  swamp  with  the remainder  of  his  command,  drove  the  enemy  across  the  Hatcheeluskee,  passed  that  river  under  their  fire,  and drove  them  into  a  more  dense  and  difficult  swamp,  where  they  dispersed.

    The  messenger  first  sent  to  report  to  me  was  killed:  a  second  was  more  fortunate.  The  parties  detached  on  other  trails  were  called  in;  and  Lieutenant  Colonel  Freeman,  with  a  small  force  of  pioneers  and  artillery,  being  charged  with  the  defence  of  the  camp,  the  disposable  force  of  Brigadier  General  Armistead’s  brigade,  and  Major  Graham’s  infantry,  and  Tustenuggee  Hajo’s  Indian  warriors,  was  moved  forward  to  support  Colonel  Henderson. ‘When  the  troops  reached  the  point  where  the  col­onel  had  entered  the  swamp,  it  was  ascertained  that  he  was  in  rapid  pursuit  of  the  enemy,  and  was  believed  to  be  fully  able  to  manage  the force  opposed  to him. 

    The  Indian  scouts  at  this  moment  reported  a  large  hostile  force  about  two  miles  to  our  right.  Major Whiting’s  battalion  was  left  as  a  reserve,  and  the  6th  infantry,  with  Major  Graham’s  company  of  the  4th,  and  a  small  party  of  Indian  warriors,  was  moved  to  the  point  indicated.  The  swamps  and  hammocks  were  entered and  passed  by  the  troops  in  perfect  order;  and  the  advance,  under  Major  Graham,  found  a  large  Indian encampment,  with  fires  burning  and  provisions  cooking;  the  enemy  having  fled  to  the  surrounding  swamps.

    As  night  was  approaching,  pursuit  was  impossible;  and  the  troops  returned  to  camp,  where  they  arrived  about  nine  o’clock.  Colonel Hen­derson’s  returned  after  ten.

    On  the  morning  of  the  28th,  a  prisoner  was  sent  to  Jumper,  and  the  other  hostile  chiefs,  with  an  offer  of peace,  on  a  strict  fulfilment  by  them  of  the  terms  of  the  treaty;  and  the  army  moved  forward,  and  occupied  a strong  position  on  the  Toho-peeka-liga  lake,  within  a  few  miles  of  the  ,point  at  which  the  Cypress  swamp approaches  it,  where  several  hundred  head  of  cattle  were  obtained.

    The  prisoners  returned  on  the  night  of  the  29th,  with  pacific  messages  from  Alligator  and  Abraham.

    Abraham visited  me  on  the  31st.  He  returned,  and  brought  Jumper  and  Alligator,  with  two  sub-chiefs,  (one  a  nephew  of  Micanopy,)  on  the  3d  instant.  These  chiefs  entered  into  an  arrangement  to  meet  me  at  Fort  .Dade, with  the  other  chiefs  of  the  nation,  on  the  18th  instant,  and  prom­ised  to  send  out  runners  and  cause  hostilities  to  be  suspended  until  the conference  shall  have  taken  place. 

    I  shall  employ  the  intermediate  time  in  preparations  for  the  most  vig­orous  prosecution  of  the  war;  and,  from  the  information  I  have  from  prisoners,  I  shall  probably  be  able  to  follow  the  enemy  into  their  most  hidden  retreats,  should  they  reject  the  terms  offered  to  them.

    The  army  commenced  its  return  march  on  the  morning  of  the  4th.  I  left  it  yesterday  about  thirty  miles  back,  and  came  in  last  evening.  It  arrived  to-day in good health and fine spirits. Colonel Henderson’s report, a copy of which is enclosed, will give you more detailed information of the battle of the Hatcheeluskee that I have been unable to imbody in this report. I unite with the colonel in the request that the officers whom he has named be rewarded  by  the  distinguished  approbation  of  the  Government;  and  I  ask,  as  an  act  of  justice,  that  the  same  distinguished approbation  be  extended  to  the  gallant colonel  himself.

    Though  but  a  small  part  of  the  force  had  the  good  fortune  to  engage  the  enemy  in  battle,  all,  without  a  single  exception,  have  performed  their  duties  in  the  most  satisfactory  manner.  They  have  opened  a  road  near  seventy  miles  into  the  interior  of  the  enemy’s  country,  and  to  the  imme­diate  vicinity  of  his  strongest  holds,  where  the  white  man  had  perhaps  never  been  before;  and  by  their  patient,  cheerful,  and  persevering  labors, have  contributed  as  much  probably  to  their  discomfiture  as  would  have been  effected  by  a  general  and  decisive  battle. 

    To  Brigadier  General  Armistead,  .Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield,  Major  Thompson,  Major  Whiting,  and  Major  Morris,  and  to  Colonel  Hender­son,  Lieutenant  Colonel  Freeman,  Major  Kirby,  and  Major  Graham,  as  well  as  to the  officers  and  soldiers  of  their  respective  commands,  I  am  under  the  greatest  obligations  for  the  prompt  and  efficient  support  which  they  have,  on  all  occasions,  given  to  me  during  the  expedition.

    Lieutenant  Colonels  Stanton  and  Brown,  of  the  Adjutant  General’s  department,  Captain  Crossman, quartermaster,  Lieutenant  Searle, princi­pal  commissary,  Doctor  Kearney,  medical  director,  Captain  Tompkins, ordnance  officer,  and  my  aids,  Lieutenants  Chambers  and  Linnard,  merit  my  warmest commendation for the efficiency,  ability and  zeal,  with  which  they  have  performed  their  duties.

    Every  department  and  every  individual  has  fulfilled  my  utmost  expect­ations,  and  nothing  necessary  to  be done  has  been  left  undone.

    As  an  act  of  justice  to  all  my  predecessors  in  command,  I  consider  it  my  duty  to  say  that  the  difficulties attending  military  operations  in  this  country  can  be  properly  appreciated  only  by  those  acquainted  with  them.  I  have  had  advantages  which  neither  of  them  possessed,  in:  better  prepar­ations  and  more  abundant  supplies,  and I  found  it  impossible  to  operate  with  any  prospect  of  success  until  I  had  established  a  line  of  depots  across the  country.

    This  is  a  service  that  no  man  would  seek,  with  any  other  view  than  the mere  performance  of  his  duty.  Distinction·  or  increase  of  reputation  is  out  of  the  question;  and  the  difficulties are  such,  that  the  best  concerted  plans  may  result  in  absolute  failure,  and  the  best  established  reputation  be  lost  without  a  fault.

    If  I  have  at  any  time  said  aught  in  disparagement  of  the  operations  of  others  in  Florida,  either  verbally  or  in  writing,  officially  or  unofficially,  knowing  the  country  as  I  now  know  it,  I  consider  myself  bound,  as  a  man of  honor,  solemnly  to  retract  it.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    TH.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                        Major  General  commanding. 
Brig.  Gen.  R.  JONES, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________


                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH
                                                                        Hatcheeluskee, 28th January, 1837

    General : Under your directions, I left the main army on the morning of the 27th, with mounted Alabama volunteers, under Lieutenant Colonel Cawlfield, with the company of mounted marines, under Captain Harris, and proceeded, accompanied by your aid, Lieutenant Chambers, on a southerly train. Orders  were  left  for  Major  Morris,  with  his  com­mand,  to  follow  as  rapidly  as  possible.

    Soon  after  we  left  your  position,  a  large  number  of  cattle  were  collect­ed  and  sent  in  under  charge  of  portions  of  two  companies  of  the  Ala­bama  volunteers.  You were present, however, when this detachment was made.

    The  troops  under  my  command  then  pursued  the  trail  for  about  a mile,  when  we  came  to  two  diverging  trails – one  taking  a  southeasterly  course,  and  the  other  more  to  the  eastward.  On  these  two  trails  the  signs  were  the  most  recent,  and  Lieutenant  Chambers,  with  a  few  men,  proceed­ed  to  trace  out  one  of  them,  while  the  rest  of  the  troops,  joined  here  by  Major  Morris,  pursued  the  other.  We  had  proceeded  but  a  small  dis­tance,  when  a  volunteer,  sent  by  Lieutenant  Chambers,  brought  informa­tion  that  fresh  signs  of  women’s  and  children’s  tracks  were  discovered,  and  requested  a  company  to  be  sent  to  him.  Captain Price’s company of volunteers was ordered accordingly.

    About  a  mile  in  advance,  a  negro  man  was  captured  at  a  fire.  He  informed  us  that  a  large  number  of negroes  were·  in  advance,  and  from  forty  to  fifty  Indians,  with  Abraham,  were  in  our  rear.  He  stated  that  he  had  left  the  latter  body  since  sunrise  in  the  morning.

    The  determination  was  promptly  made  to  retrace  our  steps,  and  attack  the  Indians.  Just  as  we  were  about  to  march,  one  of  the  volunteers  came  up  and  gave  information  that  Lieutenant  Chambers  had  overtaken  a  considerable  force  of  Indians  and  negroes.

    An  order  was  given  to  proceed  to  his  support,  and  a  rapid  movement  made  for  that  purpose.  When  we  came  up  with  him,  he  was  in  posses­sion  of  two  Indian  women  and  three  children,  besides  a  body  of  negroes  taken  by  the  volunteers  in  the  adjoining  pine  woods.  He  had  also  in  his  possession  over  a  hundred  ponies,  a  large  quantity  of  plunder  packed  on  them,  as  well  as  several  stand  of  arms.  The  main  body  of  the  enemy escaped  in  the  swamp,  and  Major  Morris  was  ordered  with  his  command  to  pursue  and  bring  them  in.  He  entered   he  swamp  in  accordance  with the  order.

   The  remaining  troops  were  then  ordered  to  form,  to  pursue  the  Indian force  in  our  rear;  and  were  ready  to  march,  when  a  firing  commenced  in the  swamp.

    Lieutenant  Searle  reached  us  here,  under  your  orders,  to  obtain  information  of  our  position  and  movements.  When  the  firing  commenced,  and  the  order  was  given  to  move  in  support  of  Major  Morris,  he  sent  a  messenger  to  you,  and  bravely  joined  the  troops  in  entering  the  swamp.

    About  half-past  eleven,  the  marines,  preceded  by  the  officers,  entered  the  swamp,  and  were  immediately followed  by  the  Alabama  volunteers.  Four  or  five  hundred  yards  after  entering  the  swamp,  we  arrived  at  a deep  stream,  from  twenty  to  twenty-five  yards  wide,  and  found  Major  Morris’s  battalion  engaged  with  the  enemy  across  it.  A  tree  had  been  felled  from  each  side,  and  formed  the  only  way  of  passing  it.

    The  troops,  as  they  came  up,  were  ordered  to  extend  to  the  right  and  left,  and  by  a  cross  fire  to  dislodge  the  enemy.  Their  fire  soon  slackened,  and  an  order  was  given  to  cross  the  stream  ;  when  Captain  Morris  (  major  of  the  1st  Indian  battalion)  gallantly  advanced  on  the  log,  followed  by  Lieutenant  Chambers,  Lieutenant Searle,  and  Captain  Harris.  Lieutenant  Lee  (  captain  of  the  Indian  battalion)  swam  the  stream  at  this  time,  and  joined  the  officers  on  the  other  side.  I  attempted  to  cross  in  this  way,  but  had  to  return  to  the  log,  and crossed  there.  At  this  stream  Private  Wright,  of  the  marines,  was  killed,  and  Sergeant  Cunningham  and  Privates  Sullivan  and  Foley  wounded,  but  not  dangerously.

    Just  as  I  was  crossing,  an  officer  was  sent  from  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield,  on  our  right,  for  orders.  He  was  directed  to  cross  as  rapidly  as  he  could  with  his  men,  after  the  regulars  and  Indians  had  passed  over ·we  were  then  promptly  joined  by  the  marines,  Morris’s  artillery,  and  some  friendly  Indians,  and  pursued  the  enemy  as  rapidly  as  the  deep  swamp  and  their  mode  of  warfare  admitted.

    Another  fire  from  them  was  received  farther  in  advance,  and  their  trail  from  the  swamp  was  followed  through  an  open  pine  woods,  and  traced  till  it  again  entered  the  swamp,  three-quarters  of  a  mile  from  the place  it  came  out.  We  were  here  joined  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield,  with  his  men,  who  had  been  delayed  in  crossing  the  stream.  The  swamp  was  again  entered,  deeper  and  more  difficult  to  pass  than  it  had  been.  The  friend­ly  Indians  were  directed  to  enter  on  each  flank,  while  the  regulars  and  volunteers  advanced  in  the  centre.  The regulars were ordered to lead the march.

    After  advancing  about  half  a  mile,  the  enemy  again  fired  on  us,  but  retreated  on  the  advance  of  the  troop.  At  this  place  Private  Peterson,  of  the  marines,  was  killed,  and  Corporal  Stevens  severely  but  not  dangerously  wounded.  On  a  farther  advance  into  the  swamp,  a  few  more  guns  were fired  by  the  enemy,  who  retreated  as  the  troops  followed  them.  

    Soon  after  this  last  fire,  a  negro  man  and  woman,  with  a  child,  were  taken,  and  an  order  was  given  for  the  return  of  the  troops  after  4  o’clock.

    The  wife  and  child  of  the  negro  man  were  kept,  and  he  was  sent  to  the  enemy,  to  induce  them  to  come  in, as  they  had  lost  all  their  clothing,  blankets,  and  other  property.

    The  troops  then  returned  to  the  position  occupied  by  Major  Whiting,  and  remained  there  till  joined  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  Cawlfield,  who  had  re­mained  in  the  open  woods  for  one  of  his  companies  which  had  not  come  out  of  the  swamp.  He  joined,  some  time  after  dark,  with  another  negro  prisoner,  taken  by  his  company.  The  troops  then  took  up  the  line  of  march,  and  reached  the  camp  of  the  main  army  at  ten  o’clock  at  night.

    Captain  Howle,  acting  assistant  adjutant  general,  was  reported  by  the  surgeon  too  unwell  to  accompany  the  troops  on  this  expedition,  and  was  not  informed  of  my  intention  to  take  command.  He  and  Captain  Cross­man,  however,  entered  the  swamp  with  an  expectation  of  taking  part  in  the  operations,  but  were  not  fortunate  enough  to  join  till  the  attacks  were  over.  Such  an  effort  is  a  sufficient  evidence  of  what  their  conduct  would have  been  had  they  succeeded  in  reaching  us  sooner.

    The  loss on  the  part  of  the  enemy  in  the  several  attacks  could  not  be  as­certained,  as  the  troops  made  no  halt  in  the  pursuit,  and  returned  after  dark.  One  Indian,  however,  and  two  negroes,  were  seen  by  the  troops  dead.

    The  result  of  this  day’s  operations  was,  the  capture  of  two  Indian  women  and  three  children,  and  twenty-throe  negroes,  (young  and  old.)  over  a  hundred  ponies,  with  packs  on  about  fifty  of  them.  All  their  clothing,  blankets,  and  other  baggage,  was  abandoned  by  the  enemy,  and  either taken  or  destroyed  by  us. 

    In  concluding  this  report,  it  gives  me  pleasure  to  state  that  Lieutenant Colonel  Cawlfield’s  command  executed  every duty  assigned  it  with  great promptness  and  firmness.

    A  portion  of  the  friendly  Indians  also,  who  came  under  my  eye,  conducted  themselves  with  great bravery.

    The  regular  troops,  both  artillery  and  marines,  displayed  great  bravery, and  the  most  untiring  and  determined  perseverance. The  marines,  how­ever,  I  cannot  refrain  from  mentioning  in  a  particular  manner.  The  killed  and  wounded show  where  they  were,  and  render  any  further  comment from  me  unnecessary.

    Lieutenant  Whitney,  of  Captain  Harris’s  company,  and  Lieutenant Brent,  of  Captain  Morris’s,  were  with  their  companies,  and  shared  in  the  dangers  and  fatigues  of  the  clay  in  such  a  manner  as  to  reflect  credit  on them.

    I  would  recommend  to  the  particular  notice  of  yourself  and  the  Government  the  five  officers  who  first  crossed  the  stream,  and  who,  in  the  pursuit,  constantly  led  the  van.  It  would  be  as  gratifying  to  me  as  it  would  be  just  to  them,  that  some  marks  of  distinction  be  bestowed  where  such gallantry  has  been  displayed.

    I  remain,  general,  with  great  respect,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                        ARCH’D  HENDERSON, 
                                                Colonel  commanding  2d  brigade  army  of  South. 
Major General Thomas S.  Jesup, 
            Commanding  army  of  the  South,  Hattcheeluskee,  Florida.

__________

                                                            FORT  DADE,  February  17,  1837.

    Sir:  Since  my  report  by  Lieutenant  Colonel  Stanton,  on  the  7th  inst.,  detailing  the  operations  of  the  division of  the  army  under  my  immediate  command,  in  the  expedition  to  the  head  of  the  Coloosahatchee,  I  have  re­ceived  a  report  from  Lieutenant  Colonel  Fanning,  with  a  copy  of  one  made  direct  to  you,  of  a  handsome  affair between  the  force  under  his  com­mand  and  the  hostile  Indians,  on  the  8th  instant,  at  the  head  of  lake  Mon­roe. The  conduct  of  both  officers  and  soldiers  deserves  the  highest  praise  ;  and  I  hope  both  may  1·eceive  the  reward  due  to  gallantry  and  good  conduct. 

    I  send  an  extract  from  the  report  to  me.

    The  enemy  were  evidently  in  great  force,  and  as  the  battle  took  place not  more  than  fifty  or  sixty  miles  from  the  point  on  the  Hatcheeluskee  where  the  advance  of  my  division  fought,  I  am.  apprehensive  they  were  reinforced  by  a  part  of  the  warriors  opposed  to  me.  If  so,  the  Indians  may  not  meet  me  to-morrow,  agreeably  to  their  promise.  I  shall  not,  however,  regret  having  afforded  them  the  opportunity  to  come  in,  as  every  claim  of  humanity  will  thus  have  been  satisfied;  and  if  we  have  to  re­commence the  war,  we  shall  have  nothing  with  which  to  reproach  our­selves,  with  regard  to  these  unfortunate  but  ferocious  people.  I  had, previously  to  marching  to  the  Coloosahatchee,  directed  Lieutenant  Colo­nel  Foster  to  resume  offensive  operations  against  the Indians  on  the  gulf  south  of  the  Withlacoochee.  Commodore  Dallas  detached  a  small  force  under  Lieutenant  Johnson,  to  co-operate  with  him.  The  combined  force  ascended  and  descended  several  rivers  not  previously  known  to  us,  and  explored  several  extensive  swamps  and  hammocks.  They  destroyed  eight  Indian  villages  and a  quantity  of  Indian,  property:  and  on  the  9th  instant,  Captain  Allen,  of  the  4th  infantry,  fell  in  with  a  superior  force  of  the  enemy  on  the  Wee-wa-ki-e-wa,  attacked,  routed,  and  dispersed  them  in  the  most  gallant  manner.  Captain  Allen,  as  well  as  the  officers  and  sol­diers  under  his  command,  behaved  with  great  gallantry,  and  deserve  every  commendation.  Allow  me  to  claim  for  them  the  attention  of  the  Govern­ment.  Lieutenant Johnson,  of  the  navy,  with  the  officers  and  men  of  his  command,  are  entitled  to  great  credit  for  their  persevering  and  prompt  at­tention  to  the  duties  with  which  they  were  charged.  That  excellent  offi­cer  was  ready to  support  Captain  Allen,  and  would  have  joined  him  had  the  action  continued.

    Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster  conducted  the  operations  confided  to  him  in  the  best  manner;  and  Major  Nelson,  with  his  battalion  of  Georgia  volun­teers,  executed  with  energy  and  promptitude  every  duty  assigned  to  him.  They,  with  the  officers  and  soldiers  under their  command,  are  entitled  to  all  praise.

    I  enclose  a  copy  of  Lieutenant  Colonel  Foster’s  last  report,  with  a  copy  of  Captain  Allen’s  report  to  him.

    Lieutenant  Hunter,  of  the  navy,  with  his  characteristic  energy  and  en­terprise,  succeeded  in  ascending  the  Withlacoochee  about  ninety  miles – ­more  than  seventy  in  a  small  steamboat,  and  the  remainder  of  the  distance  in  a  barge  constructed  for  the  purpose.

    His  voyage  has  demonstrated  that  the  river  cannot  be  used  for  any  val­uable  purpose  in  our  operations  in  this  country.  The  difficulties  of  navigation  are  such  as  could  be  removed  only  in  time  of  peace,  and  the  ex­pense  of much  time  and  great  labor.

    So  arduous  and  unremitted  have  been  the  labors  of  this  army,  and  so  rapid  and  constant  its  marches,  that  men  and  horses  are  broken  down.  The  mounted  men,  to  perform  efficient  service,  should  be  remounted,  and  great  additions  must  be  made  to  the  train  if  hostilities  should  recommence.

    The  entire  absence  of  all  means,  except  those  brought  into  the  country,  renders  it  difficult  to  remain  many days  in  succession  in  the  field.  The  Indians  cannot  be  pursued  without  mounted  men,  and  to  support  their horses  in  the  interior  is  almost  impossible.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    THOS._S.  JESUP. 
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General  Washington  City.

[Extract.]

                                                                        Fort Call, February 12, 1837

  GENERAL:  On  the  29th  ultimo  I  was at the head of lake Monroe, with  ample  supplies  for  your  army. On the 8thinstant the enemy attacked us in great force.

    He was repulsed, and did not show himself afterwards.  On  the  9th  instant  I  received  your  orders  to  retire  upon  this  place.  I  could  have  been  here  on  the  10th,  but  deferred  the  retrograde  movement  until  this  morning  ;  not  willing  the  enemy  should  think  we  retired  in  consequence  of  the  contest  with  him.

    I  herewith  forward  a  copy  of  my  official  report  to  the  Adjutant General;  also,  a  copy  of  an  order  read  at  the  grave  of  the  late  Captain Mellon,  and  which,  I  trust,  you  will  approve.  

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  general,  with  great  respect,  your  most  obedient servant.

                                                                                    A.  C.  W.  FANNING, 
                                                                        Maj. 4th artillery, Brev.  Lieut. Col. 
Major  General  T.  S.  Jesup,
            Commanding  army  in  Florida,  Fort  Armstrong.

__________

                                                                        Fort Dade,  February  15,  1837.

    Sir  :  Upon  my  reception  of  your  letter  of  the  8th  instant,  I  wrote  you  that  operations  should  cease  in  the left  wing  of  the  army  of  the  South;  and  that  Nelson’s  horse  should  be  sent  to  Fort  Drane.  Neither  of  these things  has  occurred  at  the  time  as  I  then  intended.

    I send you orders Nos. 9 and 10. The  movements  directed  in  these  orders  took  place  on  the  8th  instant.  I immediately  countermanded  them,  and  ordered  the  troops  to  camp,  on  the  reception  of  your  letter  of  the  8th instant  ;  but  their  return  could  not  be  effected  until,  in  the  case  of  Nelson,  two  o’clock  in  the  afternoon  of  the  10th  instant;  and  in  the  case  of  Captain  Allen,  at  eight  o’clock  in  the  evening  of  the  same  day.

    The combined operations, directed in the orders referred to, although not  perfectly  successful,  yet  produced  a greater  knowledge  of  the  country,  and  brought  about,  between  three  and  four  o’clock  of  the  afternoon  of  the  9th  instant,  a  very  gallant  little  affair.  At  the  extremity  of  an  Indian  village,  on  the  Wiwakiakki,  or  Clear  river,  between  Captain  Allen  and  forty  men  of  the  4th  infantry,  and  about  fifty  warriors;  in  which  the  Indians  were beaten,  and  driven,  from  a  mile  to  n  mile  and  a  half’,  upon  the  run  ;  the  officers  and  men  constantly  pressing  on  them,  cheering  and  firing  as  they  advanced,  stopped  by  nothing.  Rivers,  creeks,  lagoons,  and  swamps  were rapidly  waded  by  these  brave  men,  who  neither  counted  the  numbers  of  the  enemy,  the  depth  of  the  streams,  nor  halted  an  instant  in  their  determined  purpose,  until  night  came  on,  when  they  were  obliged  to  desist.  ·

    Towards  the  close  of  the  affair,  Sergeant  Clendenning,  a  soldier  of  twenty  years  standing,  in  the  4th  infantry,  fell.  His  comrades  bore  his  body  to  the  boats,  and  rowed  them  to  the  steamboat  American,  a  distance  of  ten miles.  A  coffin  was  made  at  Fort  Clinch  :  and  he  was  buried  on  an  island  at  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochcc.  Such  is  often  the  death,  and  such  should  always  be  the  funeral,  of  a  soldier.

    Lieutenant  Johnson,  of  the  navy,  (who  was  placed  under  my  orders  by  the  soldierly  feeling  and  correct  judgment  of  Commodore  Dallas  at  my  first  suggestion,)  and  his  command,  who  were  on  the  river  in  boats,  the moment  they  heard  the  first  firing,  hastened  up  to  the  scene  of  action  with  all  that  promptitude  which  ever  characterizes  bravo  and  tried  sol­diers.  The  commanding  officer  takes  a  pride  in  naming  to  you,  general, the gentlemen  who  compose  this  entire  command.  Captain  Allen,  of  4th  infantry,  commanded.  He  was  assisted  in  the  battle  by  Dr.  Parsons, of  the avy;  Midshipnmn  Watkins,  and  Mr.  Bayly,  a  gallant  and  disin­terested  volunteer from  the  State  of  Maine.  ‘With  Lieutenant  Johnson  were  Passed  Midshipman  Borden  and  Midshipman  Boudinot.

    Lieutenant  Hunter,  of  the  navy,  who  deserves  great  credit  for  his  late  persevering  and  arduous  trip  up  the  Withlacoochee,  in  the  steamer  Crow­ell,  also  remained,  at  my  request,  at  the  mouth  of  the  river  (anxious  and  willing  to  participate  in  my  operations)  until  the  cessation  of  hostilities  took  place,  when  he  passed  into  Tampa  Bay.  To  all  these  brave  sol­diers,  both  officers  and  men,  I  have  given  all  I  have  in  my  power  to  of­fer-my sincere  and  hearty  thanks.

    I  regret  to  say,  general,  that  Nelson’s  horse  are  unfit  for  immediate  service.  I  was  compelled  to  leave  with  Major  Wilson,  at  the  position  selected  by  me  for  artillery  and  infantry  of  my  command,  nineteen  horses  and  twenty-one  men;  thirteen  more  men  are  dismounted.  One hundred and nine mounted men compose Major Nelson’s command.  With  hay  and  oats  they  would  soon  be  able  to  take  the  field.  By  easy  marches,  and  with­out  injury  to  them,  I  have  brought  them  here,  where  they  can  go  to  Fort  Drane,  should  things  take  an  unfavorable  turn, after  the  18th  instant,  or  immediately,  as  you  may  wish.  They  are  now  a  few  miles  farther  from  Fort  Drane  than  when  at  my  camp,  in  the  vicinity  of  Fort  Clinch;  but  the  fine  corn  here  will  more  than  compensate  this  ;  (the  corn  at  Fort  Clinch  being  bad  😉  and,  if  hostilities  recommence,  I  can  return  as  soon  as  an  express  would reach  the  position  of  my  command  from  this  place.

    Hoping  that  all  my  acts  may  meet  your  approval,  I  am,  general,  with  the  highest  consideration  and  respect, your  obedient  servant,

                                                                        W.  S.  FOSTER, 
                                                Lt.  Col.  com.  south  wing  of  army  of  the  South.
Major  General  T.  S.  JESUP,  commanding,  &·c.

    P.  S.  Thirty-two  cattle  captured  on  our  last  march.

___________

                                                MOUTH  OF  THE WITHACOOCHEE,  
                                                                                                February  10,  1837.

    COLONEL:  In  obedience  to  your  instructions,  I  proceeded  with  my  com­pany  on  board  of  the  United  States  steamer  America,  commanded  by  Lieutenant  Johnson  of  the  navy.  The  boat  got  under  way  early  yester­day  morning,  and  grounded.  After  using  every  exertion  to  get  her  off,  we  found  it  impracticable,  and  accordingly  embarked  in  Mackinac  boats,  and  proceeded  about  twelve  miles  down  the  coast;  whence  we  entered  the  Crystal river,  and  ascended  it  to  a  point  about  ten  miles,  where  we  discovered  a  fresh  trail,  and  oysters  which  had been  recently  taken  out  of  the  river  by  the  Indians.  This  point,  or  shell-bank,  was  surmounted  by  an  oak  tree,  which  was  worn  smooth  by  the  Indians  in  ascending  up  for  the  purpose  of  reconnoitring.

    I  left  the  boats  at  this  point,  taking  with  me  forty  men.  Lieutenant Johnson proceeded up the river with the boats.  After  a  short  distance,  I  entered  an  Indian  camp,  which  had  been  hastily  and  recently  abandoned.  All  their  cooking  utensils,  camp  equipage,  &c.  were  left  in  the  camp. Large  quantities  of  the  compta  root,  cabbage tree,  and  its  berries,  were  found  here,  besides  skins  of  cattle,  deer,  and  bears.  The  bayous  and  riv­ers  afford oysters  and  fish  in  abundance:  and  I  hesitate  not  to  assert  that  man  may  here  subsist  from  resources  that  are  inexhaustible.  Leaving  this  camp,  about  one  quarter  of  a  mile  distant,  we  entered  upon  another,  the  most extensive  I  have  seen  in  Florida  ;  and,  from  the  number  of  huts,  I  think  it  must  have  contained  two  or  three  hundred.  Whilst  we  were  examining  this  camp,  Indians  were  discovered  at  the  upper  end.  We  im­mediately  attacked  them,  and  drove  them  about  two  miles,  through  sev­eral  small  hammocks  and  across  two  or  three  bayous,  or  estuaries  of  the  sea,  where  we  were  arrested  by  deep  water,  and  a  dense  hammock  upon  the  opposite  side.  I  here  ordered  a  halt,  to  bring  up  my  rear.

    Having  found  a  narrow  strip  of  land  over  which  we  could  pass,  a  charge  was  again  sounded,  and  rapidly  executed,  under  a  heavy  fire  from.  the  enemy,  who  forthwith  retreated  and  dispersed;  and  I  regret  to  state  that  Sergeant  Clendenning  was  killed  at  this  juncture.

    Lieutenant  Johnson,  of  the  navy,  upon  hearing  the  firing,  promptly  joined  me  near  this  hammock,  with  all  the  force  that  could  be  spared  from  the  boats.  Night  coming  on,  the  Indians  could  not  be  pursued  any  farther.  We  retired  to  our  boats,  with  the  body  of  the  sergeant,  and,  descending  the  river  some  distance,  encamped  for  the  night.

    Midshipman Watkins, and Mr.  Bayly,  who  volunteered  his  services;  fought  bravely  throughout  the  whole  affair.

    I  am,  sir,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    G.  W.  ALLEN, 
                                                                                                Captain  4th  infantry
Col.  W.  S.  Foster, 
            Commanding  4th  infantry.

                                                                        HEADQUARTERS,  FORT  DADE,  
                                                                                                February  17,  1837.

    Sir  :  I  had  the  honor  to  receive  last  night  your  letter  of  the  4th  ultimo,  with  a  copy  of  the  President’s  message  and  the  documents  accompanying  it;  for  which,  accept  my  acknowledgments.

    I  am  waiting  most  anxiously  the  movements  of  the  hostile  chiefs.  The  attack  on  Lieutenant  Colonel  Fanning has  caused  me  to  doubt  their  sin­cerity  even  more  than  before ;  for,  although  I  consider  myself  bound  to  allow  them  an  opportunity  to  come  in,  I  place  but  little  reliance  on  their  professions.  There  would  be  no  difficulty  in  making  peace  if  they  were  allowed  to  remain  in  the  country,  even  as  citizens,  or  individuals  sub­jected  to  our  laws  ;  but  many  of  them  prefer  death  to  removal.  In  all  the  numerous  battles  and  skirmishes  that  have  taken  place,  not  a  single  first-rate  warrior  has  been  captured,  and  only  two  Indian  men  have  surrendered.  

    The  warriors  have  fought  as  long  as  they  had  life  ;  and  such  seems  to me  to  be  the  determination  of  those who  influence  their  councils – I  mean  the  leading  negroes.  To-morrow, however, will determine the  question as  to  their  sincerity.  Should  they  refuse  the  terms  which  I  have  offered,  the _war  must  recommence,  and  there  will be  little  prospect  of  closing  it  during  the  present  season.

    If  I  were  as  well  acquainted  with  the  country  as  the  hostile  chiefs  are  I  would  undertake  to  defend  it  with  five  hundred  men  against  as  many  thousand,  My  last  march,  as  well  as  the  operations  of  Lieutenant  Colonels  Foster  and  Fanning,  has  demonstrated  that  we  can  pursue  the  enemy  into  their  strongest  holds,  but  we  cannot remain  there  a  sufficient  length  of  time  to  produce  any  lasting  effect  upon  them.

    We  may  conquer  them  in  time,  and  may  destroy  them,  it  is  true;  but  the  war  will  be  a  most  harassing  one,  and  will  retard  the  settlement  and  improvement  of  this  country  for  many  years  to  come.  I  am  not  disposed  t.  overrate the  difficulties  which  surround  me  ;  but,  in  communicating  with  you,  it  would  be  criminal  to  underrate them.  The  force  I  have  is  as  large  as  could  well  be  supplied,  and  as  large,  perhaps,  as  is  necessary  to  carry  on  operations  in  any  part  of  this  country.  I  consider  it  amply  sufficient  to  beat  the  whole  force  of  the  enemy  if  they  were  concentrated;  but  the  enemy  will  not  concentrate.

    To  enable  you  to  judge  of  the  difficulties  of  carrying  on  operations  here,  I  beg  of  you  to  examine  the  map,  and  observe  the  dispersed  state  of  the  troops  and  the  enemy.  On  the  27th  ultimo,  the  advance  of  my  divis­ion fought  on  the  Hatcheeluskee,  seventy  miles  southeast  of  this  place,  at  the  head  of  the  Coloosahatchee.  On  the 8th  instant,  Colonel  Fanning  fought  at  the  head  of lake  Monroe,  perhaps  sixty  miles  northeast  of  my  battle  ground.  On  the  9th,  Captain  Allen  fought  a  party  of  the  enemy  near  the  Gulf,  at  least  seventy  miles  west  of  this  place;  and  I  have  been  com­pelled  to  detach  a  part  of  the  dragoons  to  Newnansville,  a  hundred  miles  to  the  northwest,  and  another  portion  of  that  corps  to  operate  against  the  Indians  on  Orange  lake,  fifty  or  sixty  miles  northeast  of  us.  General  Hernandez  is  to  operate  on  the  eastern  side  of  the  peninsula,  from  St.  Augustine, south.  Thus  it  will  be  seen  that  the  forces  composing  this  army  are  divided  into  six  different  corps,  covering  an  extent  of  country  at  least  a  hundred  and  fifty  miles  square.

    The  posts  necessary to  be  kept  up  are  Fort  Brooke, Fort Foster,  Fort  Dade,  Fort  Armstrong,  Fort  Drano,  Fort Winder,  Fort  Harlee,  and  Fort  Heileman,  on  a  line  or  road  from  the  former  to  the  latter  inclusive,  a  distance  of  one  hundred  and  eighty  miles  ;  another  post  is  necessarily  kept  up  near  the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee,  one  at  Volusia,  one  at  St.  Augustine,  one  at  Picolata;  besides  numerous  other  small  posts  which  are  absolutely  ne­cessary  to  cover  the  country  and  protect  the  inhabitants.

    With  such  numerous  posts  and  detachments,  it  will  readily  be  seen  that  a  large  force  cannot  be  employed  in  any  single  operation.

    If  the  war  should  recommence,  I  shall  break  up  some  of  the  posts,  in  order  to  take  their  garrisons  into  the field.

    February  18. – Abraham  has  just  come  in  with  a  flag,  accompanied  by  a  nephew  of  the  Indian  chief  Cloud, and  a  negro  chief.

    He  repeats  that  Jumper,  Holatuchee,  Alligator,  and  others,  are  on  the  way,  and  will  probably  arrive  to-morrow.  I  am  yet  doubtful  of  the  result.

                        l  have the honor  to  be,  sir,  
                                                            Your obedient servant, 
                                                                                        THOS. S. JESUP 
The  Hon.  B.  F.  Butler, 
Secretary of War, Washington, City

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY OF THE SOUTH
                                                                        Fort  Dade,  February  
20,  1837.

    Sir:  The  Indian  chiefs  were  to  have  met  me  on  the  18th,  hut  they  have  not  yet  arrived.  They  have  sent  two  of  the  sub-chiefs,  with  several  Indians  and  Indian  negroes,  to  inform  me  of  the  cause  of  their  delay  :  the message  is  not  satisfactory,  but  the  Indians  are  slowly  coming  in.  To  be  able  to  take  the  field  promptly,  if they  should  deceive  me,  I  shall  require  at  least  four  hundred  horses.  I  have  had  scarcely  any,  except  the  broken­ down  horses  of  the  Tennesseans,  and  the  broken-down  trains  of  Govern­or  Cali’s  army;  and  the  consumption  of  horses  by  this  service  exceeds any  thing  I  have  ever  witnessed  before.  ·

    To  reach  Micanopy,  I  must  have  mounted  men;  and  so  severe  has  been  the  service  which  I  have  exacted  of  the  mounted  volunteers,  that  they  have  not  among  them  a  hundred  horses  fit  for  immediate  service.  I  shall  be under  the  necessity  of  ordering  a  purchase  ;  and,  for  that  purpose,  must  send  an  officer  to  Savannah.  If  peace  should  be  made,  the  horses  will  probably  sell  for  nearly  their  original  cost  ;  if  it  should  not  be  made,  I  shall  gain  time  by  making  the  purchase  immediately.

    By  the  most  extraordinary  and  unremitted  exertions  of  the  quarter­master’s  and  commissary’s  departments,  I  have  kept  this  army  in  the  inte­rior  of  the  country,  engaged  in  the  most  active  operations,  since  the  17th December  ;  and  I  shall  keep  it  in  the  interior  so  long  as  there  is  a  hostile warrior  in  the  field.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

                                                                                    T.  S.  JESUP
                                                                        Major General  commanding. 
The Hon. B. F. Butler, 
Secretary of War, Washington City

__________

                                                                                    FORT DADE
                                                            February 22, 1837,  
4  o’clock,  P.M.

    Sir  :  Alligator  and  Clond  (who  commanded  at  Wahoo)  have  just  ar­rived,  and  report  that  Holah-Touchee,  second  chief  of  the  nation,  will  be  here  to-night.  Jumper  and  Micanopy  have  not  come.  I  am  not  yet  sanguine as  to  the  result,  but  hope  that  all  may  go  as  we  desire. 

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    T.  S.  JESUP
The  Hon.  B.  F.  Butler
            Secretary of War, Washington City

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH
                                                                        Fort Dade, February 25, 1837.

    Sir  ;  I  have  the  honor  to  report  that  a  portion  of  the  hostile  Indian  chiefs,  with  a  number  of  warriors,  red  and  black,  visited  me  at  this  place,  in  accordance  with  an  arrangement  made  with  Jumper,  Alligator,  and Abraham,  on  the  4th  instant,  at  the  head  of  the  Coloosahatchce.

    Neither  Jumper  nor  Micanopy  came  in  ;  but  Ho-lo-ah  Toochee,  second  chief  of  the  nation,  and  brother  of  Micanopy,  attended  as  the  represent­ative  of  his  brother  and  of  the  nation.

    Ho-lo-ah  Toochee  informed  me  that  runners  had  been  sent  to  call  in  all  the-chiefs  and  warriors,  to  meet  me  on  the  18th  instant;  but  that  the  In­dians  were  so  widely  dispersed,  that  the  information  could  not  be  sent  to  all  in  time.  He  declared  that  the  Indians  were  all  desirous  of  peace,  but  he  could  not  say  whether  they  would consent  to  emigrate.  Micanopy  requested  him  to  say  that  the  troops  had  driven  him  into  a  “bad  swamp,”  from  the  good  land  on  which  he  had  formerly  lived,  and  he  desired  to  be  allowed  to  remain  there.  I  informed  Ho-lo-ah  Toochee  that  emigration  was  an  indispensable  condition  of  peace.  He  said  Micanopy  had  not  in­structed  him  on  that  point.  I  informed  him  that  I  could  enter  into  arrange­ments  for  peace  with  no  one  but  Micanopy  himself;  that  I  expected  him  here,  and,  if  he  desired  peace,  he  must  come  :  but  he,  as  well  as  all  the  other chiefs  and  warriors,  must  distinctly  understand  that  there  could  be  no  peace  without  emigration.  Ho-lo-ah Toochee  undertook  to  commu­nicate  with  his  brother,  and  Alligator  with  Jumper;  and  they  engaged  that  both  those  chiefs  should  visit  me  on  the  4th  of  March.

    Twelve  hostages  have  been  left  with  me,  one  of  them  a  nephew  of  Mi­canopy.  All  hostile  Indians  north  of  the  Withlacoochee  and  the  road  to  Volusia  are  to  withdraw  south  of  that  line,  and  are  not  to  return  north  of  it·  without  a  written  permission  from  headquarters  ;  and  those  east  of  St.  John’s  are  also  to  withdraw  to  the west  of  that  river,  as  soon  as  in­formation  can  be  communicated  to  them  by  runners.  In  the  mean  time,  I  reserve  the  right  of  establishing  a  post  near  the  mouth  of  the  Coloosa­hatchee,  and  one  near  the  head  of  the  St.  Jolm’s ;  and,  also,  of  re-estab­lishing  Fort  King,  should  I  think  proper  to  do  so.  I  am  also  to  continue  the  troops  in  active  employment,  on  the  frontier  north  of  me,  should  cir­cumstances  require  it.  Peace  may  be  the result  of  my  conference  with  Micanopy,  should  he  come  in  ;  but  I  am  not  sanguine  that  he  will  come  ;  or,  if he  come,  that  he  will  consent  to  make  peace  unless  emigration  be  abandoned.  I  therefore  consider  it  to  be  necessary  to  continue  the  most’  vigorous  preparations  for  an  immediate  and  active  campaign  ;  and,  if  the  chiefs  should  not  come  in,  or  should  refuse  peace  on  the  terms  offered,  I  shall  be  able  to  recommence  operations  the moment  they  disperse.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                                    TH.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                        Major General  commanding.
Brig.  Gen.  R.  JONES, Adjutant  General,  
                                                Washington  City.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                                                    Fort Dade, March 6, 1837.

    Sir  :  I  have  the  honor  to  report,  for  the  information  of  the  Secretary  of  War  and  the  General-in-chief,  that  I  have  this  day  entered  into  a  con­vention  with  the  Seminole  Indians,  by  their  second,  third,  and  fourth  chiefs,  representing  the  principal  chief,  Micanopy,  and  the  nation,  for  the suspension  of  hostilities,  and  the  immediate  removal  of  the  whole  nation west  of  the  Mississippi.  I  enclose  a  copy  of  the  convention,  or  capitu­lation,  from which  it  will  be  seen  that  I  have  granted  to  the  Indians  the  most  liberal  terms.  This  I  considered  the  dictate  of  policy  as  well  as  of  sound  economy.  To  have  attempted  the  exaction  of  severe  terms,  might  have  led  to  a  renewal  of  hostilities,  by  which  millions  might  have  ex­pended,  and  many  valuable  lives  lost  by  exposure  to  the  climate  as  well as  by  the  arms  of  the  enemy.

    As  the  Indians  respect  nothing  but  force,  I  shall  be  compelled  to  retain the  troops,  in  readiness  for  active service,  until  a  considerable  portion  of  them  at  least  take  their  departure  for  the  West,  which  I  hope  will  have been  done  before  the  1st  of  May.

    The  wagon-trains  were,  in  a  great  measure,  broken  down  ;  in  consequence  of  which,  I  ordered  a  hundred mules  ·from  New  Orleans  ;  and  the  horses  of  the  mounted  men  being  rendered,  by  the  severe  service  they  have  performed,  entirely  unfit  for  service,  and  mounted  men  being  abso­lutely  necessary  to  pursue  the  scattered  hands  of  Indians,  should  any  of  them  determine  not  to  come  in,  I  ordered  an  officer  to  Savannah  to  pur­chase  four  hundred  horses.  On  them  I  shall  mount  the  dragoons,  and  a  portion  of  the  other  regular  troops,  and  shall  thus  be  able  to  compel  a  full  execution  of  the  treaty  ;  my  depots  being  so  arranged,  that  I  can  oper­ate  at  any time – being  [not]  more  than  from thirty  to  forty  miles  from supplies.

    I  am,  sir,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                                                                                                                                        THOMAS  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                            Major General,  commanding. 
Brig.  General  R.  JONES, 
                        Adjutant General, Washington

    Capitulation  of  the  Seminole  nation  of  Indians  and  their  allies,  by  Jumper, Holahtoochee, or  Davy,  and  Yaholoochee,  representing  the  principal  chief  Micanopy,  and fully  empowered  by  him,  entered  into  with  Major  General  Thomas  S.  Jesup,  commanding  the  United  States  forces  in  Florida,  this  sixth  day  of  March,  one thousand  eight hundred  and  thirty-seven.

    Article  1;  The  chiefs  above  named,  in  behalf  of  themselves and  the  nation,  agree  that  hostilities  shall  cease  immediately,  and  shall  not  be  resumed.  

    Article  2.  They  agree  and  bind  themselves  that  the  entire  nation  shall immediately emigrate  to  the  country  assigned  to  them  by  the  President of  the  United  States,  west  of  the  Mississippi. 

    Article  3.  Until  they  emigrate,  they  will  place  in  the  possession  of  the general  commanding  the  troops,  hostages  for  the  faithful  performance  of their  engagements.  

    Article  4.  The  Indians  shall  immediately  withdraw  to  the  south  of  the Hillsborough.  Those  found  north  of that  river,·  and  a  line  drawn  from  Fort  Foster  due  east  from  it  to  the  ocean,  without  permission  of.  the  gen­eral commanding,  after  the  1st  of  April,  will  be  considered  hostile.

    Article  5.  Major  General  Jesup,  in  behalf  of  the  United  States,  agrees  that  the  Seminoles,  and  their  allies,  who  come  in,  and  emigrate  to  the West,  shall  be  secure  in  their  lives  and  property  ;  that  their  negroes,  their  bona  fide  property,  shall  accompany  them  to  the  West  ;  and  that  their  cattle  and  ponies  shall  be  paid  for  by  the  United  States,  at  a  fair  valuation.

    Article  6.  That  the  expenses  of  the  movement  west  shall  be  paid  for  by  the  United  States.

    Article  7.  That  the  chiefs,  warriors,  and  their  families  and  negroes,  shall  be  subsisted  from  the  time  they assemble  in  camp  near  Tampa  Bay,  until  they  arrive  at  their  homes  west  of  the  :Mississippi,  and  twelve  months thereafter,  at  the  expense  of  the  United  States.  

    Article  8.  The  chiefs  and  warriors,  with  their  families,  will  assemble  in  the  camp  to  be  designated  by  the  commanding  general,  as  soon  as  they  can;  and  at  all  events  by  the  10th  of  April.  Yaholoochee  will  come  in  at  once  with  his  people,  and  the  other  towns  will  follow  as  fast  as  possible.

    Article  9.  Transports  will  be  ready  to  take  the  Indians,  with  their  ne­groes,  off  to  their  western  homes.

    Article  10.  Micanopy  will  be  one  of  the  hostages:  he  is  to  visit  the  commanding  general,  and  will  remain  near  him  until  his  people  are  ready  to  move.

    Article  11.  All  the  advantages  secured.  to  the  Indians  by  the  treaty  of  Payne’s  Landing,  and  not  enumerated in  the  preceding  articles,  are  hereby  recognised,  and  are  secured  to  them.

Signed  at  Camp  Dade,  this  sixth  day  of  March,  one  thousand  eight  hun­dred  and  thirty-seven.

                                                                                    THOMAS  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                            Major  General  commanding.  
                                                                                                [Signers.]

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                            Fort  Dade,  (  Florida.}  March  8,  1837.

    GENERAL:  Under  instructions,  I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  re­ceipt  of  yours  of  the  9th  ult.,  addressed  to  Major  General  Jesup,  wherein  you  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  sundry  letters,  orders,  &c. from these headquarters.  .

    One  paragraph  of  your  letter  states,  “It  was  not  known  that  his  (Major  Dearborn’s)  command  had  been  ordered  from  Irwinton,  Georgia,  to  Florida,  until  the  receipt  of  your  order  of  No.  23,  of  the  11th  of  December,  on  the  19th  of  January.”  In  answer  to  this  paragraph,  the  general  desires  me  to  inform  you  that  the  removal  of  Major  Dearborn’s  command  from  Irwinton  to  the  lower  part  of  Georgia  was  reported  to  your  office  as  far  back as  the  20th  of  September,  1836,  as  shown  by  the  accompanying  letter,  (copy,)  which  is  now  forwarded  under  supposition  that  the  original  must  have  miscarried.

    I  am,  general,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    J.  A.  CHAMBERS,  
                                                                          Lt.,  A.  D.  C., and  A. A.  Gen.
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones,  
            Adjutant  General  U.  8.  Army, Washington, D.  C.

__________

                        HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,
                                                            Fort  Dade,  (Florida,) March  26.,  1837.

    Sir :  I  have  the  satisfaction  to  be  able  to  report  that  the  Seminole  chief  Yaholoochee,  (Cloud,)  who  commanded  at  the  Wahoo,  is  at  Tampa  Bay  with  his  family;  and  he  has  about  two  hundred  of  his  people  in  a camp  near  that  post.

    The  principal  chiefs  on  the  St.  John’s, Tuskinia  and  Emathla,  (Philip,) have  sent  messages  to  me:  they  will  obey  the  order  of  Micanopy  to  emi­grate.  Philip  sent  his  son,  who  informed  me  that  his  father  had  required  Abiaca,  (Sam  Jones.)  chief  of  the  Micasukies,  to  join  him  and  accompany  him  on  his  visit  to  Micanopy.

    The  war  is  no  doubt  ended,  if  a  firm  and  prudent  course  be  pursued  ; but  a  trifling  impropriety,  on  the  part of  the  white  population  of  the  frontier,  might  light  it  up  again.  The  negroes  rule  the  Indians,  and  it  is  important  that  they  should  feel  themselves  secure  :  if  they  should  become  alarmed,  and  hold  out,  the  war  will be  renewed.

    I  shall  send  one  battalion  of  the  Indian  warriors  serving  in  Florida  to  Mobile,  so  soon  as  it  can  be  mustered and  paid,  and  transports  be  obtained.

    The  Alabama  draughts  will  be  sent  off  as  soon  as  they  can  be  paid:  trans­ports  have been  provisioned  for them.  The  naval  garrison,  furnished  by  Commodore  Dallas  for  Fort  Foster,  has  been  relieved  and  ordered  to  join the  ship  whence  it  was  detached.

    I  shall  discharge  the  volunteers  and  militia  force  as  rapidly  as  the  circumstances  of  the  service  will  permit,  and  shall  take  measures  to  have  the  ordnance  and  other  stores,  not  required  in  Florida,  taken  to  the  most  convenient  arsenals  and  store-houses.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  very  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP., 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding.
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                                        Fort  Dade,  March  28,  1837.

    GENERAL:  In  my  report  of  the  affair  of  the  27th  of  January  at  the  Hatcheeluskee,  I  omitted  to  mention that  Major  Thompson  commanded  the  6th  regiment  of  infantry:  That  excellent  officer  moved,  on  that  oc­casion,  at  the  head  of  his  corps,  under  General  Armistead,  to  support  Colonel  Henderson,  who  commanded  the  advance  of the  army;  and  after­wards  to  attack  the  Indians  concentrated  in  the  “Cabbage  hammock,”  to  the  right  of  the  colonel’s  position.  It  is  due  to  justice  that  the  omission  be  noticed,  and  I  respectfully  ask  that  this  note  be  published  as  a  part  of my  report.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  general,  most  1·espectfully,  your  obedient servant,

                                                                                                TH.  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding. 
Brig.  Gen.  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant General, Washington City.

___________


                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH
                                                            Fort  Dade,  (Florida,)  March  29,  1837.

    GENERAL  :  I  enclose  a  letter  from  Colonel  Henderson  of  this  day’s  date,  which  I  will  thank  you  to  file  with  my  report  of  the  expedition  to  the  head  of  the  Coloosahatchee.  Captain  Price,  as  well  as  the  other officers  of  the  corps  to  which  he  is  attached,  was  most  efficient  and  useful  throughout  the  whole  of  the  operations  in  the  field.  On  the  occasion  referred  to,  Lieutenant  Chambers  was  detached  from  headquarters,  and  directed  movements  as  a  staff  officer,  but  was  not  in  command  of  the  troops.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                THO.  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding.
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones,  
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________


                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH, 
                                                            Fort Dade,  March  29,  1837.

    GENERAL  :  In  the  report  made  to  you  on  the  28th  January  last  of  the  operations  of  the  previous  day,  two mistakes  were  made  inadvertently,  and  which  are  now  corrected.

    The  first  mistake  is  in  not  stating  that  the  negroes  taken  in  the  pine  woods  were  captured  by  a  detachment  of  Captain  Will’s  company  of  Alabama  volunteers,  sent  with  orders  to  Captain  Price.  The  second  error  is  in  mentioning  Lieutenant  Chambers  as  commanding  the  force  that  captured  the  Indian  women  and  children,  the  ponies,  and  other  property  of  the  enemy.  Captain  Price  was  in  command.

    I  remain,  general,  with  great  respect,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                        ARCHIBALD  HENDERSON,  
                                    Colonel  commanding  2d  Brigade  Army  of  the  South. 
Major  Gen.  Thos.  S.  Jesup, 
            Comd’g  Army  of  the  South,  headquarters,  Fort  Dade.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,  
                                                            Fort  Brooke,  (Florida,)  April  3,  1837.

    SIR:  I  have  this  moment  received  your  letter  of  the  14th  ultimo. 

    When  I  directed  the  dredge-boat  to  be  taken  to  lake  George  and  lake  Monroe,  I  was  not  aware  that  it  was in  the  service  of  the  Engineer  depart­ment  ;  I  had  been  informed  that  it  belonged  to  the  custom-house.  It  was, I  believed  then,  and  believe  now,  entirely  idle,  and  I  thought  it  would  be  more  useful  to  the  public  in  deepening  a  channel,  through  which  supplies ·  might  be  taken  to  the  vicinity  of  the  enemy’s  strongest  retreats, than  lying  idle  near  the  mouth  of  the  St.  John’s.  The  instant  I  was  apprized  that  the  boat  was  in  the  service  of  the  Engineer  department,  though  the  ob­ject  for  which  it  had  been  taken  remained  unaccomplished,  I  ordered it  to  be  returned.  The  order,  a  copy  of  which  is  enclosed,  was  dated  on  the 1st March.

    I  am,  sir,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                THOS.  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding.
Brig. Gen. R. Jones, 
            Adjutant General, Washington City

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                                                                        Fort  Dade,  March  1,  1837.

    COLONEL  :  When  I  directed  that  the  dredge-boat  should  be  employed  and  sent  to  lake  George,  I  was  not  aware  that  it  was  in  the  service  of  the  Engineer  department.  I  supposed  that  it  was  kept  in  service  by  the  Treasury  Department,  or  the  Territory,  for  the  purpose  of  keeping  the  navigation  of  the  St.  John’s open.  Had  I  been  aware  of  the  service  on  which  it  was  employed,  I  would  not  have  ordered  it.  You  will  cause.it  to  be immediately  returned  to  the  Engineer  department,  and  will  instruct  Lieutenant  Colonel  Harney  accordingly.

    I  am,  colonel,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,  .

                                                                                                THOS.  S.  JESUP.
Lieut.  Colonel  J.  B.  CRANE, 
            Com’ding  district  between  St.  John’s  and  Suwannee,
                                                                                    Fort  Heileman.

__________


                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH, 
                                                                                    Tampa  Bay,  April  23,  1837.

    GENERAL  :  I  will  thank  you  to  cause  the  enclosed  paper  to  be  placed  on  file  in  your  office.  I  shall, perhaps,  have  occasion  to  refer  to  it  here­after,  in  connexion  with  the  attempt  of  the  Legislative  Council  of  Flor­ida  to  repeal  their  militia  laws,  in  order  to  prevent  the  draught  of  four  com­panies  of  men  which  I  had  required,  not  for  service  in  the  field,  but  to  aid  in  defence  of  the  settlements  when  the  small  force  under  my  command  was  operating  in  the  field,  and  was  necessarily  spread  in  detachments  over  a  surface  of  more  than  a  hundred  and  fifty  miles  square.

    Many  of  the  principal  Seminole  chiefs  are  with  me,  but  their  people  come  in  slowly.  The  majority  of  the  Indians  doubt  the  sincerity  of  our  promises  ;  and  those  whose  interest  it  is  to  renew  the  war – I  moan  un­principled  white  men – spread  reports  that  all  who  come  in  are  to  be  exe­ecuted.  Both  Micanopy  and  Jumper have  complained  to  me  that,  when  they  had  their  people  collected,  and  in  march  to  this  place,  they  have  been  alarmed  by  such  reports  and  have  disappeared  ..

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  most  respectfully,  general,  your  obedient servant, 

                                                                                    T.  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                        Major  General  commanding. 
Brig.  Gen.  R.  JONES, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                                CAMP, NEAR FORT DRANE, January 17, 1837
ORDER,

    The  detachment  will  move  to-morrow  morning  at  7  o’clock  for  the  Ocklawaha,  and  the  surrounding  country;  five  days’  provision  and  forage  for  the  detachment  will  be  carried  in  the  wagons.  Those captains who refuse  to  march,  will  state  on  the  bottom  of  this  order.

                                                                                    JOHN  WARREN, 
                                                                                 Colonel Commanding


    I  refuse  to  obey  the  above  order,  because  my  company  was  raised  and  mustered  into  service  for  the  protection  of  Fort  Heileman,  and  to  scour  the  country  from  the  south  branch  of  St.  Mary’s,  thence  to  New river,  thence  to  the  head  of  Santa  Fe  and  Picolata.  I  have,  as  I  con­ceive,  transcended  my  authority  in  having  my  men  to  escort  a  train  so  far  as  Fort  Drane,  though,  according  to  the  colonel’s  orders,  they  have  not  murmured,  but  escorted  the  train  to  Fort  Drane.  They,  contrary  to  expectation,  are  ordered  into  the  nation  ;  which  order  they  refuse  to  obey,  believing  that  I  am  not  clothed  with  power  to  order  them  farther.  I  have called  for  volunteers;  out  of  twenty-three  who  were  present,  there  were  ten  volunteers;  I  tendered  those,  who,  with  my  own  service,  are  accepted.  I  am  ready,  together  with  my  command,  to  obey  the  orders  of  my  colonel, to  scour  the  country  to  a  certain  extent,  east  or  north  of  Fort  Drane.  The  articles  which  I  have  reference  to have  the  muster  of  Major  B.  K.  Pierce,  subject  to  the  approval  of  Governor  Call,  com­mander-in-chief  of  the  troops  in,  Florida;  the  articles  were  presented  and  recognised  by  the  Governor,  and  we  were  regularly  mustered, which  my  pay-rolls,  which  I  have  now  in  possession,  will  show.

                                                                        JOHN  G.  SMITH, Captain,                                                                                      commanding  Whitesville  rangers,

    Having  called  on  my  company  to  obey  the  above  order,  they  refuse,  as  they  volunteered  for  the  protection  of  the  frontier  of  Drane  and  Nassau  counties;  they  are  at  this  time  drawn  from  their  homes,  leav­ing  their  families  exposed  to  the  enemy,  and  wholly  unprotected;  they  are  now  ordered  to  the  Indian  nation,  and  I  feel myself  in  duty  bound  to  disobey.

                                                                                    JOHN  PILES,  Captain.


    My  reason  for  disobeying  the  above  order  is,  my  men  were  summoned  to go  on  a  scout  in  pursuit  of  the  enemy,  who  attacked  Deli’s  negroes  near  the  Santa  Fe,  and  pursue  them  as  far  as  Orange  lake,  if  required.  Con­trary  to  their  expectations,  they  were  ordered  to  guard  baggage-wagons  as  far  as  Fort  Drane,  which  they complied  with  without  murmuring  ..  They  are  now  ordered  to  the  Indian  nation  ;  they  were  mustered  for  the  pro­tection  of  Jacksonville  and  its  vicinity.  The  present  order  they  consider  illegal  and  unjust,  and  therefore  refuse  to  obey.

                                                                        A.  WAHOMAN,  
                                                            Lieutenant  commanding  detachment  
                                                                 Jacksonville  Black  Hawk  rangers
.


    I  refuse  to  obey  the  above  order  for  many  reasons:  First,  because  my  company  is  unwilling  to  go;  believing  that  the  enemy  is  in  the  rear,  they  are  willing  to  scour  the  country  north  of  Fort  Drane  before  they  return. Secondly,  because  my  orders  from  Colonel  Crane  were,  that  as  soon  aa  the  pursuit  of  the  Indians  that  captured  Mr.  Dell’s  negroes  was  given  up,  I  was  to  return  to  my  post  at  Mandarin.  My  company  was  mustered  into  service  for  the  protection  of  the  east  bank  of  the  St.  John’s  river,  although  we  have  a  contract  with  Governor Call  that  they  shall  not  cross  the  river  without  their  own  consent;  yet  have  they  ever  been ready  and  prompt  to  obey  all  orders  at  a  moment’s  warning.  They  crossed  the  river  to  guard  the  baggage-train,  or  scour  the  western banks  of  the  St.  John’s,  to  the  frontiers  of  the  enemy;  they  are  now,  in  violation  of  Governor  Cali’s  agreement,  ordered  to  the  Indian  nation,  which  they  simultaneously  refuse  to  obey.

                                                                                    MOSES  CURRY, 
                                                                               Commanding  company.

__________


                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH, 
                                                                                    Tampa  Bay,  May  5,  1837.

    GENERAL:  Many  of  the  field  officers  of  the  regiments  serving  in  Florida,  as  well  as  the  company  officers, have  been  absent  during  the  whole  campaign,  greatly  to  the  injury  of  the  service,  and  to  the  inconvenience  of  those  who  have  been  constantly  at  their  posts.  The  state  of  Lieuten­ant  Colonel  Crane’s  health,  as  well  as  Lieutenant  Colonel  Fanning’s  and  Major  Fauntleroy’s,  renders  temporary  absence  from  duty  in  Florida  necessary.  Those  officers  have  performed  their  duties  most  faithfully  and  efficiently;  and  I  most  urgently  request  that  other  field  officers  be  ordered  to  join,  in  order  to  afford  them  some  respite  from  their  labors.

    Dr.  Stinnecke,  who  had  joined  but  a  short  time  before,  was  taken  away  to  attend  a  medical  board  at  New  York!  Could  not  some  of  the  idle  members  of  the  medical  department,  at  the  posts  from  which  the  troops  had been  withdrawn,  have  been  placed  upon  that  board?  The  doctor  certainly  had  no  claims  from  service,  and  it  was  with  some  surprise  that  the  order  for  his  withdrawal  was  received.  When  any  other  considera­tion  than  that  of  services  is  allowed  to  govern,  either  in  regard  to  stations  or  indulgencies,  discontent  is  the  inevitable consequence,  and  justly  so  ;  the  General-in-chief,  I  am  sure,  could  not  have  been  aware  of  the  little  claim  the  doctor  had  from  services  performed,  when  he  consented  that  he  should  be  taken  from  this  army,  where  his  services  were  necessary,  and  employed  on  a  duty  which  many  who  are  entirely,  or  comparatively,  idle could have  performed.

    I  am  anxiously  waiting  the  tardy  movements  of  the  Indians.  There is  no  danger  of  a  renewal  of  hostilities,  but  the  chiefs  find  great  difficulty  in  collecting  their  people.  Several  bands  have  been  assembled,  but  they  have  been  dispersed  by  reports  that  they  were  to  be  punished  so  soon  as  they  should  place  themselves  within  our power.

    I  am,  general,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                            Major  General  comd’g  army  of  the  South. 
Brig.  General  R.  JONES, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

___________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH, 
                                                                        Tampa  Bay,  May  8,  1837.

    Sir  :  By  reports  from  every  part  of  my  command,  I  am  induced  to  be­lieve  that  the  Indians will  all  come  in  and  emigrate  in  the  course of  the s 

    Powell  and  other  chiefs,  with  their  people,  are  at  Fort  Mellon,  and  will  depart  thence  to  this  post  in  a  few  days.  All  the  chiefs  of  the  nation  have-now  expressed  their  readiness  to  obey  the  commands  of  Micanopy,  and  remove  to  the  West.

    Whilst  waiting  the  tardy  movements  of  the  Indians,  I  have  detach­ments  of  the  troops  and  Indian  warriors  employed  in  exploring  the  coun­try  and  surveying  routes  through  it.  The  Withlacoochee  has  been  exam­ined  from its  mouth  to  its  source;  the  Fort  King  road  surveyed  hence  to  Fort  Armstrong  ;  and  a  party  is  now  exploring the  country  from  this  place  to  Camp  Izard.  I  have  directed  the  survey  of  several  routes  north  of  the Withlacoochee,  and  the  exploration  of  the  St. John’s above Fort Mellon. These  surveys  will  enable  me  to  have  a  good  topographical  map  of  the  theatre  of  operations  in  Florida  prepared.

    I  have  directed  the  withdrawal  of  the  garrisons  of  Forts  Armstrong  and  Drane.  The  garrison  of  the  former goes  to  Fort  King,  and  the  latter  to  Micanopy.  The  garrison  of  Fort  Clinch  will  be  withdrawn  so  soon  as  the  ·  stores  at  that  post  can  be  disposed  of.

    Officers  are  much  wanted;  many  of  those  serving  with  this  army  are  worn  out  by  the  effects  of  the  climate,  and  the  severe  duties  they  have  performed.  They  require  a  respite  from  duty;  and  I  respectfully  suggest  the  justice  to  them  of  ordering  those  who  have  been  absent  from  the  field  to  take  their  places.

    Captain  Mallory,  without  a  single  claim  to  indulgence  from  the  services  he  had  performed,  was  permitted  to  leave  the  army  on  the  solemn  assu­rance  that  he  had  made  his  arrangements  to  retire  from  the  army,  and  would  go  out  of  it  immediately,  and  that  he  would  be  put  to  serious  in­convenience  by  being  detained  in  Florida.  As  he  was  not  efficient,  I  per­mitted  him  to  go.  I  now,  however,  learn  that  he  remains  in  service:  if  so,  I  request, as  an  act  of  justice  to  others,  that  he  be  ordered  to  join  his  company  without  delay.

    I  am,  general,  respectfully,  your  obedient·  servant,

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding. 
Brig.  Gen.  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS, ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                                                                               Tampa  Bay,  May  17,  1837.

    GENERAL:  I  have this  moment  received  general  order  No.  28, dated the 1st instant.  Dr.  Heiskell,  in  consequence  of  severe  domestic  affliction,  was  permitted,  a  few  clays  ago,  to  proceed  to  the  North;  and  the  services  of  Dr.  Tripler cannot possibly be dispensed with.  There  is  not  an  army  surgeon  or  assistant  at  this  post,  and  I  propose  ordering  him  hither  so  soon  as  his  services  can  be  dispensed  with  at  his  present  post,.  The move­ments  of  the  Indians  are  so  tardy,  that  no  calculation  can,  with  certainty,  be  made  as  .to  the  time  of  their  emigration.  Their  women  and  children  were  to  be  collected  from  a  surface  of  from  fifteen  to  twenty  thousand  square  miles.  Many  of  them  are  sick  ;  and  I  find  that,  without  the  ap­plication  of  force,  many  months  may  elapse  before  they  can  be  assembled.  I  do  not  consider  it  my  duty  to  recommence  the  war,  believing  that,  if  I were  to  do  so,  beat  the  Indians,  and  make  another  peace,  similar  delays  to  those  which  we  now  experience  would  then  occur  in  collecting  and  re­moving  them.  I  have,  it  is  true,  but  little  acquaintance  with  them  myself; but  those  best  acquainted  with  them,  and  among  them  Major  Graham  and  Captain  Page,  believe  they  will  all come  in  so  soon  as  their  families  can  l  be  collected.  We  committed  an  error,  in  regard  to  these  Indians,  in  the attempt  to  remove  them  before  the  country  was  required  for  white  settlers.  In  all  other  cases  of  removal,  a  white  population  has  been  pressing  upon  and  crowding  out  the  Indians  before  they  were  required  to  leave  the  homes  of  their  fathers  ;  here,  there  was  no  population  pressing  upon  them,  and  they  have  never  felt  the  necessity  to  go.  Besides, the negroes rule them  ;  and  the.  arrival  of  several  Floridians  in  camp  for  the  purpose  of  looking  after  and  apprehending  negroes,  spreads  general  consternation  among  them.  Those  that  were  in  camp fled,  and  carried  the  panic  with  them,  and  we  cannot  now  induce  them  to  return.

I  am,  general,  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding
Brig.  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________


                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                                                                                    Tampa  Bay,  May  23,  1837.

    GENERAL:  I  have  the  honor  to  report  that  I  have  withdrawn  the  gar­rison  and  stores  from  Fort  Clinch,  at the  mouth  of  the  Withlacoochee­. The  naval  force  under  Lieutenant  Bell  has  gone  to  Pensacola,  and  the  military part  of  the  garrison  has  gone  as  an  escort  to  a  wagon-train  to  Fort  King,  whence  it  will  join  its regiment  at Fort  Dade.  The  ordnance  stores  were  sent  to  Mount  Vernon,  Alabama,  and  the  subsistence  and  quartermaster’s  stores,  except  ten  thousand  rations  sent  to  Fort  King,  have  been  removed  to  this  place.

    I  enclose  an  extract  from  a  report  of  Major  Wilson,  whom  I  detached  some  weeks  past  to  Pensacola  and  Mobile  point,  from  which  it  will  be  seen  that  he  has  succeeded  in  causing  the  whole  party  of  Indians,  who had  for  some  time  frightened  the  good  people  of  that  part  of  the  country  out  of  their  wits,  to  join  the  Creeks  at  Mobile  point.  The  same  prudent  course  would  bring  all  the  Indians  in  Alabama  and  West  Florida  into camp.

    I  am,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding
Brig.  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                                Mobile  Point  (ALABAMA,)  May  18,  1837.

    GENERAL:  I  have  the  honor  to  report  the  return  of  Lieutenant  Rey­nolds,  a  few  days  since,  from  up  the  bay  of  Pensacola,  where  I  had  despatched  him,  with  three  or  four  Indians  from  the  Point,  for  the  pur­pose  of  bringing  in,  if  possible  by  persuasion,  a  small  party  of  Euchees  who  had  wandered  off  from  the  nation,  evidently  with  the  design  of  esca­ping  emigration  to  the  West.  He  fell  in  with  them  at  their  camp,  about  thirty  miles  from  Pensacola;  and  having  a  conference  with  them  through  his  interpreters,  he  represented  their  helpless  condition,  and  the  probabil­ity,  if  they  persisted  in  strolling  through  the  settlements,  of  their  all  being  destroyed  by  the  whites,  who  they  knew  had  already  fired  on  their  party  and  killed  one  or  two  of  their  warriors;  he  would,  therefore,  advise  them  to  come  in  and  join  their  friends  at  the  Point,  where  they  would,  prepara­tory  to  emigrating,  be  both  fed  and  protected  by  the  government:  to  which  they  assented,  and  came  in,  together  with  a few  Creek  families  that  had  been  living  on  the  bay  for  years  past.

    The  lieutenant  had  them  transported  by  water  to  this  place,  amounting  in  all  to  seventy-men,  women,  and  children.

                                                                                    HY.  WILSON,  U. S. A. 
To  Major  Gen.  Thos.  S.  Jesup, 
 Corn’ng  army  of  the  South,  Tampa  Bay,  Florida.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH
                                                                                    Tampa  Bay,  June  5,  1837.

    Sir:  I  have  the  honor  to  report  that  this  campaign,  so  for  as  relates  to Indian  emigration,  has  entirely  failed.

    The  Seminole  chiefs  were,  I  believe,  sincere  in  their  intentions  of  ful­filling  the  provisions  of  the  treaty;  but they  have  no  influence  over  their  people,  except  for  purposes  of  mischief.  The  warriors,  I  understand,  have  degraded  Micanopy,  and  placed  Sam  Jones,  the  Mickasuky  chief,  at  the  head  of  the  nation.  Micanopy,  Jumper, and  Cloud,  met  me  in  council  on  the  1st  instant;  they  were  to  have  come  in  again  on  the  2d,  but  failed;  and on  the  night  of  that  day  they  were  seized  by  a  force  of  armed  warriors  and  removed  to  the  interior,  I  succeeded  in  securing  a  number  of  their negroes,  and  have  sent  them  to  New  Orleans.

    The  season  is  too  far  advanced  for  the  renewal  of  offensive  operations. All,  therefore,  that  can  be  done,  is  to place  the  troops  in  such  positions  as  shall  at  the  same  time  cover  the  frontier  and  give  reasonable  assurance  of  health.  The  garrisons  of  Forts  Mellon  and  Call,  on  the  St.  John’s,  and  Foster,  on  the  Hillsborough,  must  be withdrawn  in  consequence  of  the  unhealthiness  of  the  sites;  and  Fort  Dade,  on  the  Withlacoochee,  must  also  be  withdrawn,  from  the  difficulty  of  supplying  it  during  the  wet  season.

    The  negroes  whom  I  seized  say  the  Indians  will  not  renew  the  war,  unless  attacked.  This may be true; but we cannot trust them.  The  best  security  for the  frontier  will  be  complete  preparations  to  repel  attack.  –  Emigration  I  consider  impracticable.  The  Indians,  generally,  would prefer  death  to  removal from the country, and nothing short of extermination  will  free  us  from  them.  Not  a  single  first-rate  warrior  has  surrendered  since  the  commencement  of  the  war;  nor  has  a  single  instance  occurred  of  a  Seminole  having  proved  false  to  his  country.

    The  difficulties  presented  by  the  country  are  great,  but  those  presented  by  the  climate  are  greater.  Many  of the  posts  necessary  to  success  during  the  season  of  operations  must  be  abandoned  early  in  the  summer,  to  pre­serve  the  lives  of  their  garrisons;  and  the  consequence  is,  that  at  the  com­mencement  of  every  campaign  nearly  all  the  interior  depots  have  to  be re-established.  

    If  operations  are  to  be  renewed  in  .the  fall,  it  is  important  that  early preparations  be  made;  and  that  the  officer  who  is  to  conduct  them  have  every  thing  in  readiness  to  take  the  field  by  the  first  of  October.  I  will  write  to  you  again  in  detail  on  this  subject.  In  the  mean  time  I  desire  you  to  present  my  most  earnest  requests to  the  Secretary of  War  and  the  General-in-chief,  that  I  be  immediately  relieved  from  the  command  of  this  army.  It  is  known  to  the  members  of  the  late  administration  that  I  was  placed  in  command  not  only  without  solicitation,  but  contrary  to  my  known  and  expressed  wishes.

    I  am,  sir,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    TH.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                        Major General  commanding. 
Brig.  Gen.  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,

__________


                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                                        Tampa  Bay,  June  17,  1837.

    Sir  :  If  I  should  not  be  relieved  from  the  command  of  this  army,  I  de­sire  to  be  permitted  to  visit  Kentucky  for  a  few  weeks.  I will thank you to lay my  request  before  the  General-in-chief  and  the  Secretary  of  War.  All is quiet in this quarter.  I  shall  leave  the  4th  and  6th  infantry  at  Fort  Dade,  on  the  Withlacoochee,  and  break  up  the  posts  of  Hillsborough,  Thlonotosossa,  and  Fort Foster.  This  accomplished,  I  shall  proceed  to  Mi­canopy  and  Black  creek,  at  one  of  which  posts  communications  will reach  me.  

    I  have  permitted  about  one-third  of  the  Indian  warriors  to  visit  their families  at  Mobile  point.  They  will  return  in  four  or  five  weeks,  when  another  party  will  be  allowed  to  go.  The  term  of  service  of  the  regiment  will  expire  on  the  31st  of  August.  Should  the  war  be  renewed,  a  regi­ment  of  Northern  Indians  should  be  engaged  to  take  their  place.  The  general  who  is  to  command,  in  the  event  of  another  campaign  being  ne­cessary,  should  be  immediately  required  to  organize  the  force  and  means  to  take  the  field  by  the  first  of October  ;  and  he  should  be  unrestricted  as  to  both.  The  nature  of  the  country  is such,  that  difficulties  increase  at  every  step,  and  the  commander  should  have  unlimited  control  both  of  measures  and  means,  and  the  entire  support  of  every  department.  A  large  regular  force  will  be  required,  no  matter  who  may  command;  and  imme­diate  measures  should  be  taken  to  raise  it.  The corps now in Florida are reduced  to  mere  skeletons;  a  considerable  portion  of  the  men  remain­ing  will  be  discharged  in  the  course  of  this  summer  and  autumn,  and  not one  will  re-enlist.  Many  of  the  officers  and  men  have  been  more  than  a  year  constantly  in  the  field,  and  have  been  completely  broken  down  by  the  labors  and  privations  of  two  arduous  campaigns  :  something  should  be  done  for  them,  and  that  speedily,  or  we  shall  have  no  force  by  the  end  of  the  year.  It  would  be  u  great  relief  to the  officers  who  have  been  long  absent  from  their  families,  if  those  who  have  avoided  the  perils  and  fatigues  of  the  field  should  be  required  to  relieve  them  for  at  least  two  or  three  months.  And  the  families  of  such  soldiers  as  remain  in  Florida  should  be  brought  to  their  posts  here  at  the  public  expense,  and  have  rations  allowed  them  by  the  Government.

I  am,  sir,  most  respectfully,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding. 
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________


                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY  OF  THE  SOUTH,  
                                                                                    Tampa  Bay,  June  24,  1837.

    Sir  :  Disease  is  developing  itself  rapidly  among  the  troops;  all  except  the  recruits  have  gone  through  two  arduous  and  harassing·  campaigns,  and  are,  in  a  great  measure,  broken  down.  The tendency to scorbutic affections  is becoming  general.  I  am  making  every  effort  to  increase  the  comforts  of  the  men,  as  far  as  the  means  in  my  power  will  enable  me  :  among  other  measures, I have  directed  that  a  convalescent  hospital  be  established  on one  of  the  keys  at  the  entrance  of  this  harbor.  This,  I  think,  will  restore  many  men  to  the  service  who  would otherwise  be  lost  to  it.

    The  garrison  has  been  withdrawn  from  Fort  Foster, also  from  Fort  Mellon  ;  and  I  shall  proceed  through  the  country  to-morrow  to  Fort  Dade,  and  thence  to  Fort  King  and  other  posts  on  the  north  frontier  of  the  Ter­ritory,  to  make  final  arrangements  for  the  protection  of  that  frontier  during  the  sickly  season.  ‘No  operations  should  be  attempted  before  October:  if  the  enemy,  however,  attack,  he  must  be  repelled,  and  driven  from  the  frontier  at  any  sacrifice.

    If  I  should  not  be  relieved  from  the  command  of  the  army,  I  request  permission  to  visit  Kentucky  for  a.  few·  weeks,  after  I  shall  have  provided  for  the  defence  of  the  frontier.

    I  have  directed  Lieutenant  Chambers,  my  aid-de-camp,  to  proceed  to  Washington  with  a  duplicate  of  my  despatch  for  the  Secretary  of  War.  From  the  position  he  has  occupied,  he  will  be  able  to  give  accurate  in­formation  on  all  matters  relating  to  the  campaign.  Should  new  corps  be  raised,  I  strongly  and  earnestly  recommend  him  for  an  appointment.  He  is  qualified  for  the  command  of  a  regiment,  and  I  recommend  that  as  high  rank  as  possible  be  conferred  on  him.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    THOMAS  S.  JESUP,  
                                                                        Major  General,  commanding. 
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones,  
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,
                                                                        St. Augustine, June [July] 8, 1837

    GENERAL:  I  enclose  two  reports,  received  last  night  by  express:  one  from  Lieutenant  Colonel  Miller,  commanding  at  Tampa  Bay,  and  the  other  from  Major  Childs,  commanding  at  Fort  King.  I  also  enclose  a  copy of  a  report  from  Captain  Bradley,  of  the  Florida  volunteers,  to  Lieutenant  Colonel  Mills,  of  an  affair  with  a  party  of  Indians  west  of  the  Suwannee.  The Indians  were, evidently  endeavoring  to  escape.  From  every  informa­tion  I  can  obtain,  I  believe  the  body  of  the  nation  mean  to  wait  our  move­ments.  The  frontier  will  be  rendered secure,  even  should  they  recom­mence  hostilities  ;  and  such  information  has  already  been  gained  of  their  country,  that  operations  may  be  carried  on  in  the  autumn  with  far  less  difficulty  than  heretofore.  I  have  in  my  possession,  or  have  sent  to  New·  Orleans,  all  the  prominent  Indian  negro  leaders.  I  have  fifteen  or  twenty  negroes  and  four  Indians,  who  may  be  used  as  guides  to  all  the  fastnesses  of  the  country.  So  soon  as  a  list  of  the  prisoners  can  be  prepared,  I  shall forward  it  to  you.  ·

    I  have  the  honor  to  ‘be,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                    THOMAS  S. JESUP,  
                                                                             Major  General commanding, 
Brigadier  General  R. Jones,  
            Adjutant  General,  Washington.

__________


HEADQUARTERS  OF  THE  TROOPS  SOUTH  OF  THE  HILLSBORO’,  
                                                                                    Tampa  Bay,  July  8,  1837.

    GENERAL:  Captains  Allen  and  Morrison  arrived  with  the  train  from  Fort  Foster  on  the  29th  ultimo;  the  latter  officer  brought  with  him  “Bow  Legs,”  brother  to  Alligator,  who  was  found  at  the  fort  with  his  rifle  and  ammunition;  he  most  unwillingly  came  to  this  post.  Upon  examination,  he  states  that  he  was  on  his  way  from his  former  residence,  at  the  “Round  pond,”  on  the  road  to  Fort  Dade,  where  he  had  been  collecting  peaches  for  the  “corn  dance;”  and  that  he  expected  to  find  cattle  and  some  corn  left  at  Fort  Foster  by  the  train.  He  says  that  Micanopy,  Jumper,  and  his  party,  were  at  Casseeme  creek,  about  three  days’  march  from  Tampa,  and  that  Micanopy  was  expecting  to  hear  from  you  by  the  messenger  he  sent  in,  and  that  he  expressed  a  great  desire  to  see  Abraham.  He  also  informed  me  that  Powell  had  said  that  the  Seminoles  would  remain  quiet  until  they  should  see  what  the  whites  intended  to  do.  Powell  and  his  party,  he  says; are  in  the  neighborhood  of Volusia,  and  south  of  that  place.

    In  consequence  of  the  near  connexion  of  this  Indian  with  Alligator,  I have  deemed  it  advisable  to  secure  him in  the  picket  with  the  other  prisoners,  and  to  forbid  any  intercourse  with  him  whatever  until  further orders.

    Major  Churchill  left  here  yesterday  for  St.  Mark’s  ;  his  wound  having improved  essentially  for  the  last  four  or  five  days.  ·

    The  sheds  for  the  marines,  and  those  for  the  artillery  and  infantry,  will be  completed  early  the  next  week.

    I  have  not  heard  from  Mullet  Key  since  the  return  of  the  Star,  but  pre­sume  the  Spaniards  have  made considerable  progress  in  preparing  for  the  reception  of  the  convalescents.

    A  party  of  Creek  volunteers  are  now  out  scouring  the  country  in  a  north  and  northeasterly  direction.

    I  am, with  the  highest  respect,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                        SAMUEL  MILLER,  
                                                                                    Lieut.,  Col.  commanding. 
Major  General  Jesup,  
Commanding  armv  of  the  South,  &·c.

__________


                                                                                    FORT KING,  July  7,  1837.

    SIR:  I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  communica­tion  of  the  6th  instant,  in  relation  to the  hostile  Indians.  On  the  5th  I  sent  word  for  them  to  come  in  ;  about  11  o’clock  five  made  their  appear­ance,  with  melons  and  fresh beef.

    They stated that one hundred were on the St.  John’s,  and  one  hundred  in  this  part  of  the  country;  that  they  had orders  not  to  molest  white  peo­ple  or  their  property,  but  to  hunt  game  and  cattle  for  their  support;  and  at  a certain  time  in  the  moon,  which  I  judge  to  be  about  the  12th,  they  are  to  return  and  go  over  the  line  established  by  the  treaty;  in  the  mean  time,  the  chiefs  were  to  go  to  St.  Augustine  to  see  the  commanding officer,  and  make  arrangements  for  a  store  for  them  to  trade  at  until  the  time  arrived for  them  to  go  off.  ·

    At  this  camp  there  are  seven  of  them,  and  at  another,  ten  miles  from  them,  seventeen.  None  of  the  latter  have  been  here;  their  corn  will  not  amount  to  much,  they  say,  in  consequence  of  not  having  been  hoed  in  season.  To-day  three  of  them  were  in;  one  had  his  squaw  with  him;  he  says  that  seventeen  Indians  were on  the  road,  nine  miles  from  this,  the  day  Lieutenant  Ross  returned  from  Fort  Armstrong,  and  the  day  the  general arrived  ;  that  the  horsemen  came  within  twenty  paces  of  them  ;  that  they  were  lying  in  the  pine  barren,  and were  afraid  to  run  or·  show  themselves  for  fear  of  being  fired  upon  before  they  could  make  known  their  peaceable  disposition  :  the  appearance  of  a  squaw  with  them  would  indicate  this.

    They  represent  the  cattle  as  very  scarce,  and  what  few  they  find  are  in  swamps,  and  so  wild  that  it  is  difficult  to  approach  near  enough  to  shoot them.

    Respectfully,  your  most  obedient  servant,

                                                                        THOMAS  CHILDS, 
                                                            Major. U. S. Army, commanding 
Lieut.  T.  B.  L1NNARD, 
            Aid-de-camp abn A. A. G., headquarters of the South

    NOTE.~ Since  writing  the  above,  one  other  of  the  seven  has  been  in;  he  says  that  a  council  was  to  have  been  held  at  Powell’s  camp,  near  Philip’s  town,  and  that  Alligator,  Hola-toochee,  Yahoolochee,  Coa-hago,  and  Coacoochee,  (Philip’s con,) were to go to St. Augustine, and that they are to be there in four days from this; but Cardjo says, as he understands the “broken days,” there are not to be there until eight days from this.  They  were  under  the impression  that  Paddy  Carr  was  at  St.  Augus­tine.  This  Indian  appeared  much  pleased  when  informed  that  General Jesup  was  there.  ·

                                                                                    T.  S.  CHILDS, 
                                                                           Major, United States Army

__________

                                                                        CHARLES  FERRY,  July  6,  1837.

    Sir  :  Being  under  the  impression  that  it  is  my  duty  to  keep  you,  as  the  commanding  officer,  advised  of  whatever  transpires  in  my  vicinity  of  a.  military  nature,  I  report  to  you,  for  the information  of  General  Jesup,  that  Captain  Bradley  went  on  a  scout,  via  this  place,  on  the  30th  ultimo,  from  San  Pedro  to  Suwannee  old town,  to  examine  about  the  fires  and  Indian  signs  reported  in  that  quarter.

    Ten  miles  from  this  place,  south,  he  discovered  signs  of  a  large  quantity  of  cattle  having  been  driven  from  this  neighborhood  southerly,  and  very  recently,  by  the  Indians.  Pursuing  his  march,  he  arrived  at  Suwannee  old town,  where  he  encamped  on  the  night  of  the  1st  instant,  Next  morning,  having  discovered  fresh  Indian  signs  leading  west  from  Old  Town,  he  immediately  marched,  and  at  nine  miles  distant  discovered  an  Indian  warrior with  a  pack – fired  on,  and  wounded  him.  He  made  his  escape  by  plunging  into  a  swamp  and  abandoning  his  pack,  filled  with  beef.  Pursuing  on  his  march,  he  came  upon  four  others,  killed  one,  and  scalped  him;  wounded  another,  who  was  well  dressed,  and  mounted  on  a  mule;  he  made  his  escape  by  abandoning  his  mule  and  pack,  leaving  much  blood  on  said  mule;  the  other  two  having  carried  him  into  the  swamp.  After  which,  in  passing  through  a  small·  swamp,  or  hammock,  came  on  others,  killed  and  scalped  one,  and  wounded  another badly,  having  seen  a  great  deal  of  blood  where  he  made  his  escape.  .

    The  whole  number  of  warriors  seen  was  ten;  and,  from  the  number  of  packs,  and  a  large  quantity  of  beef,  ( about  200  lbs.)  dried  and  fresh,  captured,  and  these  preparations  for  drying  beef,  Captain  Bradley  is  of  opinion that  there  is  a  considerable  number  about  fifteen  or  twenty  miles  west  of  Old  Town,  or  at  Cook’s  hammock,  about  forty  miles  from  Old  Town.  There  were  women  and  children’s  signs  seen, as  well  as  some  of  their apparel  taken,  together  with  a  large  quantity  of  cooking  utensils  and  some  jewelry.  Captured  from  the  Indians, in  addition,  three  mules,  three  ponies,  and  one  horse,  all  with  good  saddles  and  bridles  on,  and  three  Indian  rifles.  The  most  of  the  articles  were  brought  here,  and  all  that  could  not be  brought  were  destroyed. 

    The  whole  of  the  day  (2d  July)  being  consumed  in  this  affair,  and  Captain  Bradley’s  men  being  exhausted, (having  30  men.)  he  deemed  it  proper  to  return  for  more  men.  He  informed  me  that  he  shall,  in  ten  or  fifteen  days,  make  another  scout,  when  he  would  like  to  have  some  assistance at  Suwannee  old  town.  

  The whites lost one horse, killed by the Indians.  The  Indians  lost  two  men  killed  and  scalped,  and  two  wounded,  with  a  great  deal  of  baggage, &c.

    I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                                                                F. L. JONES,
                                                                                        Lieutenant, U. S. Army
Lieut. Col. Mills

__________

                                    HEADQUARTERS,  ARMY OF  THE  SOUTH, 
                                                                                    St  Augustine,  July  10,  1837.

    SIR  :  Many  of  the  companies  serving  in  Florida  are  mere  skeletons. Some  of  them  will  be  without  non-commissioned  officers,  and  will  be  re­duced  to  from  eight  to  fifteen  men  in  the  course  of  a  few  weeks,  Were  the  companies  thus  reduced  united  and  formed  into  full  companies,  the  service  would  be  greatly  benefited  :  its  moral  would  be  improved,  because  every  company  would  then,  at  all  times,  be  under  the  direction  of  officers, which,  with  the  small  number  of  officers  fit  for  duty  in  Florida,  is  not  always  possible  now  ;  besides,  the  officers  would  feel  more  pride  of  profession,  and  be  more  active  and  attentive,  when  commanding  full companies,  than  whet  l  commanding  corporals’  squads.

    I  must  ask  the  favor  of  you  to  bring  this  matter  to  the  consideration  of  the  General-in-chief;  and  if  he  has no  objection  to  the  course  proposed,  I  respectfully  ask  for  authority  to  organize  complete  companies  out  of  the  skeletons  serving  here.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  most  respectfully,  general,  your  obedient  servant,  

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding.
Brigadier  General  R.  Jones, 
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

__________

                                                HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,
                                                                                    St.  Augustine, July 19, 1837.

    GENERAL  :  I  enclose  an  extract  from  a  report  of  Lieutenant  Colo­nel  Miller,  commanding  at  Fort  Brooke,  by  which  it  will  be  seen  that  the  Creek  volunteers  are  entirely  broken  down.  I  had  ordered  fifty  war­riors  to  join  Major  Birch  as  an  escort  for  the  stores  which  I  had  directed  to  be  removed  from  Fort  Dade  to  Fort  King,  and  the  regiment  can  furnish  only  thirty  men.  ·

    I  shall  send  the  whole  corps  off  as  soon  after  my  return  to  Tampa  as  transports  can  be  obtained.

    I  have  the  honor  to  be,  general,  your  obedient  servant,

                                                                                                T.  S.  JESUP, 
                                                                                    Major  General  commanding
Brig. Gen. R.  Jones,  
            Adjutant  General,  Washington  City.

[EXTRACT]

   HEADQUARTERS  OF  THE  TROOPS  SOUTH  OF  THE  HILLSBORO’,  
                                        &nb